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Full text of "Athlete, The"

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http://www.archive.org/details/athletethe196869unse 



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(Left to Right) Front Row: S. Hemlepp, G. Dowdy, D. Staten, Coach Leon- 
ard Blanton, J. Conley, T. Huff- Second Row: J. MuUins, Mgr. S. Grizzle, 
B. Lynch, B. Moffitt, D. Stevens, Mgr. K. Mills. D. Dameron, F. Leibee, 
B. Carter, B. Ison, D. Cox, M. Tackett, J. Jones. 



Official Organ of tiie 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

August, 1968 



KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL TRACK MEET - CLASS AAA 

LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY, MAY 18, 1968 
Louisville Male High School Track Team - K.H.S.A.A. Champion 1968 




(Left to Right) Front Row: C. Parr, J. Morehead, D. Brown, D. Luckett. R. Carpenter. Second Row: G. Tuell. J. Renfro, 
B. White. R. Maclilin. A. Jones. A. Coffe.v, E. Wakefield. D. Scrivener. G. Benton. H. Dallum. E. Binford. presenting tro- 
phy. 



100 Yard Dash— 




4. Zoe!ler-St. Xavier 




Mi:e Relay— 




1. Brown-Male 




5. Dodds-Iroquois 




1. Eastern 




2. Rudolph-Male 






Time-4:26.4 


2. Male 




3. Watson-Eastern 




120 Yard High Hurdles- 




3. Durrett 




4. McCoy-Eastern 




1. Webb-DeSales 




4. Shawnee 




5. Geralds-Iroquois 




2. Evans-Durrett 




5. St. Xavier 






Time-10.0 


3. Hepner-Trinity 






Time-3:23.f 


220 Yard Dash— 




4. Kirby-Male 








1. Rudolph-Male 




5. Cinnamon-Butler 




f3hor Put— 




2. Brown-Male 






Time-14.S 


1. Smith-Valley 




3. Watson-Eastern 




ISO Yard Low Hurdles— 




2. Gahlinger-DeSales 




4. Geralds-Iroquois 




1 Srrivpnpr-IVIaJp 




3. Jones-Male 




5. Kincheloe-Eastern 




2. Evans-Durrett 




4. Mason-Central 






Time-21.7 


3. Cinnamon-Butler 




5. Wells-Thomas Jefferson 


446 Yard Dash— 

1. Geralds-Iroquois 

2. McCoy-Eastern 




4. Ray-Trinity 

5. Webb-DeSales 


Time-19 5 


Pole Vault— 


Distance-55' 


3. Conwill-Flaget 






JL llilt^ ±iJ.tJ 


1. Price-Waggener 




4. Carpenter-Male 




3S0 Yard Relay — 




2. Luckett-Male 




5. Whitson-Eastern 




1. Eastern 




3. Sanders-Durrett 






Time-49.5 


2. Male 




4. Heuser-Pleasure Ridge Park 


ISO Yard Run- 




3. Trinity 




5. Welsh-Flaget 




1. Baumer-Durrett 




4. Durrett 






Height-13' 


2. Penny-Shawnee 




5. Pleasure Ridge Park 






3. Sanders-Atherton 






Time-1:29.0 


High Jump — 




4. Dbfon-Waggener 




2 Mile Run— 




1. Reed-Flaget 




5. Adams-Eastern 




1. Harry-DeSales 




2. Glass-St. Xavier 






Time-1:54.8 


2. Roberts-St. Xavier 




3. Wooten-Eastem 




Mile Run — 




3. Wikoff-Iroquois 




4. Gardner-Central 




1. Boyd-Durrett 




4. Starr-Trinity 




3. Gentleman-Valley 




2. Hawkes-Westport 




5. Bailey-Butler 






Height-6' 


?>. Green-Seneca 






Tiine-9:47.3 


(Continued' on Page 


Sixteen) 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXXI— NO. 1 



.4UGUST, j.968 



$1.00 Per Year 



Report of Audit 

1350 So. 1st Str«t 
Louisville. Kv. 
July 22, 1968 
Mr. Theodore A. Sanford. Secretary & Treasurer 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 
Lexington, Kentucky 
Dear Sir: 

Pursuant to instructions received, we have made an audit of 
the books and records of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATH- 
LETIC ASSOCIATION for the period of one year beginnint 
July 1. 1967. and ending June Zl), 1968. In addition, we have 
prepared and attached hereto s'latements of the Receipts and 
Disbursements which, in our opinion, reflect 'he true financial 
condition of the Association as of June 30, 1968. 

The Cash Funds en Hand and U. S. Savings Bonds and tUo 
Building and Loan Associations savings accounts were found to 
be correct and verified by generally accepted auditing proce- 
dures. 

We find the records presented to us for the purpose of audit 
to be in agreement and in good condition. 

Respectfully submitted, 
HUET L. JOHNSON 
Certified Public Accountant 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLEViC ASSOCIATION 

PERIOD FROM JULY 1, 1967, TO JUNE 30, 1968 

STATEMENT OF 

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 

RECEIPTS: 

Balance in checking account July 1. 1967 $ GO. 371. .53 

Annual Dues: 375 m $3.00 $ 1,125.00 

Officials' Dues: 

Football: 601 (p. $3.00 1,803.00 

Basketball: 1416 i.i $3.00 4,248.00 

Baseball: 404 c<i $3.00 1,212.00 

Reciprocity Official: 

Football: 60 {a $1.00 60.00 

Basketball: 41 w $1.00 41.00 

Baseball: 5 ifi. $1.00 __-- 5.00 

Officials' Fines 140.00 

Redeposits (Bad Checks Made Good) 45.00 

Advertising in Magazine 1.495.00 

Sale of Publications 414.72 

Sale of Bonds 3,041.40 

Ticket Sales — Annual Meeting 449.50 

Interest Received from 

Certificate of Deposit 500.00 

Interest Received from 

GoTernment Bonds 2.713.40 

Int. Rec'd from 1st Fed. Savings 

& Loan Ass'n 450.00 

Int. Rec'd from linion Fed. Savings 

& Loan Ass'n 450.00 

Int. Rec'd from Lexington Fed. 

Savings & Loan Ass'n 450.00 

Transferred from State Basketball 

Tournament Account 176,171.28 

Refunds 600.00 

Receipts — State Baseball Tournament — 1,825.00 
Football Playoff: 

A & AA Ticket Sales 9.722.00 

AAA Profit 11,055.00 

A & AA Program Profit 691.52 

A & AA Program State Tax 32.13 

AAA, AA & A Radio Fees 120.00 

Receipts — State Track Meets 1.259.05 

Receipts — Wrestling Tournaments 1,323.55 

Receipts — State Swim Meets 923.00 222,365.55 

$ 282,737.10 

DISBURSEMENTS: 

Beard of Control Expense $ 5,679.68 

Commissioner's Salary (Base Sal. $15,500.00) 12,134.23 

Expense-Commiss'.oner's Office 490.02 

Ass't Commissioner's Salary (Base Sal. $13,500.00) 10,388.87 

Travel Expense-Ass't Commissioner 1,000.56 

Secretarial Salaries 11,169.87 

Janitor's Salary 1.374.32 

Postage 2,777.43 

Office Supplies 742.59 

Janitor Supplies 31.45 



New Equipment 2.744.62 

Insurance 1,493.45 

Equipment Repairs & Seryice Contracts 1,#90.66 

Blue Cross & Blue Shield 1,141.00 

Building Repairs and Grounds Maintenance 1.139.25 

Utilities 1.278.21 

Telephone and Telegraph 1,447.19 

Fidelity Bonds 45.00 

Printing 3.891.04 

Appropriation to K.A.P.O.S. 308.00 

Purchase of Publications 4.943.29 

Delegates to Nat'l Fed. Meetings 1 — 5,581.34 

National Federation Dues 207.60 

Appropriation to Kentucky D.G.W.S. StO.OO 

Olvmojc (James Committee-Donation 200.00 

Rental on Films 506.50 

Audit 14((.00 

Refunds 11.25 

Bad Checks 35.00 

Meals-Annual Banquet 2.310.00 

Speaker-Annual Banquet 117.00 

Taxes ond Withholdings: 

Federal Income Tax Withheld $ 6,418.90 

Social Security 2,648.46 

City Income Tax Withheld 667.69 

State Income Tax Withheld 1,038.24 

Hospitalization Withheld 81.50 

State Sales and Use Taxes 1.110.98 11,963.77 

Transfer of Funds: 

Savings Certificates 60.000.00 

Insurance Subsidy 21.335.50 

K.H.S.A.A. Retirement Fund 31.500.00 

Magazine : 

Printing and Engravings 5,540.32 

Mailing 200.00 5,710.32 

Officials' Division: 

Honorariums and Expenses-Clinics 1.275.19 

Printing & Miscellaneous Expenses __ 222.11 

Schools for Officials 2,701.80 

Expenses-Regional Clinics 545.55 

Officials' Emblems 1,430.40 6,173.05 

Swimming: 

State Committee Expense 907.95 

Troohies and Medals (State Meets) __ 1,072.27 

Officials (State Meets) 263.22 

Mileage and Local Entertainment 

(State Meets) 2,895.65 

Pool Rental & Additional Services ^ 328.60 

Ticket Sellers & Takers (State Meets) 61.75 $ 5,529.44 

Golf: 

Mileage and Local Entertainment 

(State Tournament) 1,750.40 

Trophies & Awards 1,667.69 

Miscellaneous Expenses 502.35 3.920.44 

Tenns : 

Mileage and Local Entertainment 

(State Tournament) 1,046.60 

Trophies and Balls 2,409.83 

Expenses-Tournament Managers 246.75 3,703.18 

Track: 

Regional Exoenses 896.25 

Troohies and Medals 5,802.97 

Officials 1,545.27 

Mileage and Local Entertainment 

(State Meets) 6,072.97 

Miscellaneous Expenses (State Meets) 285.72 

New Equipment 207.67 

Labor (State Meets) 20.00 

Equipment Rental (State Meets) 178.31 

Ticket Sellers & Takers (State Meets) 60.00 15.069.16 

Baseball : 

Refunds on Dist. Tournament Deficits 1,755.75 

Trophies and Awards 2,239.39 

Refunds on Regional Tournament 

Deficits 493.70 

Baseballs (State Tournament) 132.07 

Transportation (State Tournament) __ 566.10 

(Continue(3 on Page Six) 



Page Two THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1968 

AUGUST 1968 VOL. XXXI— No. 1 Minutes of Board Meeting 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky The Board ol Control of the Kentucky High School 

Office^ifpubircation-LexinX^ty"" 40501 Athle:)c Assoolation met at the K.H.S^A A. office, Lex- 

Second class postage paid at Lexington. Kentucky. IHgton, On FriGay moming, June 7, 19jj. The meeting 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD ^y^, p^ned to Order by President Don R. Rawlings, 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD ■., t-, j u i\/ i /-. u t-, t-, ■ ti i i. 

^^^^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^.j|.j^ Board members Mojton Combs, Don Davis, Radph 

BOARD OF CONTROL c. Dorjey, Predion Holland, Foster J. Sanders, and 

v[ctpresident-"::::::-RaTph''cr Dor"f u'eo^'ot hU^^^ Oral. C. featsr; Commissioner Theo A Sanford, and 

Directors— Aivin Almond (1967-71), Bowling Green: Morton Ajsisiant Commissioner J. B. Manstield present. Tlhe 

Combs (1968-72). Carr Creek: Don Dayis (1967-71), Independ- invocation WaS givCH by PreStOn Holland. 

ence: James T. Dotson (1968-72). Johns Creek: Don R. Raw.ings ■"^"^'-'^^ s J 

(1965-69), Danyiiie: Foster J. Sanders (1966-70). Louisville. Ralph C. Dorsey moveu, Seconded by Oran C, Teater, 

Subscription Rate .$1.00 per Year ^^^^ ||V,g reading of the minutes of the April 19th meet- 

_^ / /O 7 /i)\ uD ^"^ ^^ waived since members of the Board had received 

^\Om the Commissionel S Ufflce ^P'^.-^ of the:e minutes. The motion was carried 

-'■' unanimously. 

Z — ,, ,, _,. , The Commissioner stated that he had sent a referen- 

rr^ inpo r ■ '/°"l^"\u "iV'''''cf -1 J v,„ t'um to all Bcard members, in which new £ind amend- 

The 19S8 clm;c3 for ootball of iciaJs and coaches regulaiions to appear in the 1968-69 booklet were 

will be conducted by Athletic Director Edgar McNabb recommended, and that the members of the Board had 

t!^^Tu r/'"'M M 1 vf ^tf^^^""^^ ^'S^l°\~'' ^°'' accepted the recommendations by unanimous voce. In 

Mitchell. Mr. McNabb has been the K-H.S.A A^ repre- .^^J^^^ ^^ necessary new regulations for Regional 

sentative on the National Federation Foo.bal Conimit- ^resiling tournaments and State Gymnastics meets, 

tee for several years. The dates an,i si.es oi .he cluncs ^^^ recommendations for changes included other new 

are as oUows: August a, Pa,il G. Blazer H.gh Sctoo , ^ j^y^^ ^^ ^:,^^ certain clarifications, correc- 

t^"T7 ,n ^ M .' ?^ H ■ J%Tt''^^^^ ^t t.ons and deletions. The Commissioner asked that these 

^, -^ ff - ,tT^' ^"^f"^' »^^'? ^f^^Vin changes be spread upon the Board minutes and this 
P.M.; August 7, Bell hign Scnooi, PmevUIe, 7:o0 P.M.; ^^^^^^^ ^^^^ ^ recommended to the Board, 

^".f"^M' a'''''^°i'. T ' . u t\^^}'''l> f I' with certain comments made by the Commissioner, 

tIh p m' T }\I f^r "^'l.t c\ , v'i'n >vere as follows; 

7:30 P^M.; August 15 Henderson Hign Schoo 7; 30 ..^ ^^^^^ Basketball Rule IX-E by substituting 

^ 'o,T^J ■?'^'P^a^™^V'^ ]iT,' t'^"' the following for the second sentence: 'Each corre- 
'?' 7 ,A D ./i T^^ ^ oA Transylvania Col ege. Lex- ^^^^ runner-up team will draw for a position in the 
7"fn''p M Kentucky Hotel, Louisville, opposite bracket.' (This is not a new rule but a clarifi- 
7.30 P.M. B ■ , .- £ nsi- • I cation. We think that the wording is an improvement. 
,- .u „ J ^' .""^u n '''„^'"f' 3'* , There will also be a Question and Answer on this in 
Football and basketball officials previously regis- ^^^ ^^^ ^„,^ InterpretaHons section.) 
'^'''''Jn^o^^ recE.ved their renewal application cards for .2. Amend Baseball Rule V (District and Regional) 
the 1968-69 schc(>l year. Three huniired offic.als fa.led ^^ ^^^^-^^^ ^^^ j^e district meeting shaU be held on the 
to iile their 19. ^6o reports on or before tne aeadlone j^,. gunday in April instead of the first Sunday in May. 
set by the Board of Control for the submitting of reports, ..3 ^.mend Baseball Rule V (District and Regional) 
and it was necessary to impose fines on ,;.nese officials ^ ^^^ ,^^^ following: The pairings shall be made in 
who failed to comply with Association rules. It is an accordance with the provisions of K.H.S.A.A. BasketbaU 
.f ^'^J'lu''" ,^s^"'.''^"?™' *at each registered official Tournament Rule IX-D.' (This merely spells out the plan 
attend the climc in ihe sport in which he is registered. ^. determining byes in the same manner as the basket- 
Twelve football officials and fifty-eight basketball offi- j^^jj ^an ) 

cials were suspended in 1967-68 for failure to attend ..4 ^mend Baseball Rule VI (District and Ke- 

clinics. gicnal) by adding the following: 'Only registered offi- 

Attention, Principals! clals shall be used.' 
Each principal of a K.H.S.A.A. member school cill "5. Delete Article IV, Section 3-d-9 in the Oonstitu- 

be supplied during the forthcoming school year with a tion. (This is no longer necessary because of the provi- 

card which will say: "Kentucky High School Athletic sions of IV-3^-8.) 

Association— This will introduce (name of principal), "6. Delete 'or tournament rules' in first sentence of 

(name of school)." The card will be signed by the Com- Article IX, Section 1, of the Constitution. (This clause 

missioner. Most administrators of Association member has had no meaning since the Delegate Assembly gave 

schools admit to their home contests fellow administra- the Board authority to adopt regulations for touma- 

tors as a matter of school poilicy. However, many times ments and meets. I have so ruled on several occasions, 

these visitors hesitate to identify themselves to the The clause shoud have been removed earlier. In the 

ticket takers. The card mentioned will assist in this matter of re-codifying rules, it is my opinion that the 

id'entifioation. Board has authority to authorize tliis deletion.) 

The identification cards are not to be considered as "7. Delete the last clause of Article IX, Section 2, 

regular season passes to home games of member of the Constitution. (This corresponds to the deletion in 

schools of the K.H.S.A.A. The determining factor in the #6.) 

cards being accepted as passes is the policy of the "8. Amend Cross Country Rule (Regional) by add- 

individual school. ing the following: 'A school not entering a team may 

The identification card may be used for admission enter one, two, three or four boys as individuals.' (This 

to all events at the state level except the State Basket- is a clarification. We have been doing ithds all along.) 
ball Tournament. A different plan for issuing these "9. Amend Cross Country Rule VII (State) by add- 

passes, along with passes to the district and regional ing to the first sentence the following; 'and to the indi- 

basketball tournaments, is provided in basketball tour- vidua! winner.' (This has been done previously but was 

nament regulations. left out of the i-ule through error.) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 190S 



Page Three 



State Winners Girls' Tennis 

LI 



Owensboro High Rifle Team Repeats 




(Left to Right) Ellen McGuire, Sacred Heart, state singla 
champion: Susan Sturma, Janet Wheeler, Tates Creek, state 
championship doubles team. 

"10. Amend Cross Country Rule VHI (Regional) by 
substituting 10' for '5' in tlhe second sentence. (This 
lias been done for several years, but was left out of Ihe 
rule through error.) 

"11. Substitute the following for the second' sentence 
of Football Rule II-B: 'No out-of-distriot games shall be 
counted by such a team in determining its Dicldnson 
Rating. If the principal is unable to schedule' the mini- 
mum of four games within the district, then games 
played with other teams in the same class will be iised 
in dci'ermming the team's rating.' (This is a clarifica- 
tion and not a change in the present rule.) 

"12. Add the following at the beginning of Section 
II of 'The Dickinson Football Rating System': 'All 
losses ana ties shall be counted. Exception: If two 
second division teams, etc' (Our K.H.S.A.A. plan from 
the beginning, of course, has provided that losses and 
ties must be counted. This was not spelled out when 
the regulations were written.)" 

Don Davis, ChEiirman of the Policy and Budget Oom- 
mittee, gave the report of his committee. 

The recommendations made by the committee were 
as follows: 

1. The annual salaries of the Commissioner and 
the Assistant Co^mmissioner, beginning July 1, 1968, 
shall be set at $18,000.00 and $15,500.00 respectively, the 
increases to reflect the feelings of the Board for a job 
well done. 

2. A change in the Constitution and By-Laws s(biould 
be made to correspond to statutes concerning school 
superintendents, providing for one-year to four-year 
contracts for Association executives, mandatory retire- 
ment at age 70, with annual contracts to be given after 
the executive attains the age of 65, this to be done by a 
referendum sent to Association member schools. 

3. An additional Assistant Commissioner should be 
appointed, with the President naming a committee to 
set up guidelines, interviews and suggested salary for 
the new appointee, the new executive to be recommeBd- 
ed to the Board by tlhe committee and' to begin work at 
the discretion of the Board. 

4. The mileage travel allowance, for the Commis- 
sioner, the Assistant Commissioner, cind the Boaid of 
Control members Shall be set at 12^. 

5. The meal allowance for the Commissioner, the 
Assistant Commissioner, and the Board of Control 
members Shall by $4.00. 

6. The K.H.S.A.A. Administration Building should be 
relocated'. A committee should be appointed to woife 
wiith the Commissioner and the Assistant Comimissioner 



(Left to Right) Front Row: R. Layne, S. Waldie. D. Lowry 
Second Row: T. Higdon. B. Matthews, M. Wells, SFC T. E. 
Dorsett. Steve Ratliff. McKell, individual chamoion- 

The Owensboro High School Rifle team won its third 
straight championship on May 21-22, with a team score 
of 1,344. Steve Ratliff of McKell won individual honors 
with 281 points. 

Seven teams competed in #ie tournament, which 
was held' at the University of Kentucky. Major Bruce 
A. Martin managed ithe tournament. Louisville Male 
High School was second in scoring with 1,311, and Mc- 
Kell High School was third with 1,297. Team and indi- 
vidual scores were as follows: 

Owensboro (1344) -Higdon, 260; Wells, 277; Layne, 
272; Matthews, 262; Waldie, 273. 

Louisville Male (1311)-Dooley, 266; Glenn, 267; Jones, 
265; HemphiU, 272; Tamplin, 241. 

McKell (1297)-PoweU. 274; Ratcliff, 281; Biggs, 233; 
Bradley, 262; Potter, 247. 

MiUersburg Military Inst. (1280) -Knab, 264; Brooks, 
253; Clark, 276; Honnsby, 230; Stanley, 257. 

Paul Blazer (1196)-Baldridge, 222; Snodgrass, 233; 
Burton, 249; Shelton, 274; Quails, 218. 

Oldham County (1112) -Shepherd, 257; Manning, 213; 
Lane, 215; Clipdvin, 210; Dykes, 217. 

Western Sinai (999)-D Goodlett, 227; W. (Soodlett, 
204; Casey, 191; Crouc^h, 227; Peach, 150. 

in finding a new site, selling the present building, and 
drawing up plans for a new building. This may result 
in appointoTient of more than one committee. We think 
this of upmost importance because of rising building 
cost, finding prime locations, and the knowledge that a 
new buOding would not be completed for two or three 
years. 

7. For the 1968 National Federation Annual Meet- 
ing, tihe number of days for expense allowances shall 
be 10. 

Don Davis moved, seconded by Oran C. Teater, that 
the reoommendations of the Policy £ind Budget Commit- 
tee be accepted and approved. The motion was carried 
unanimously. 

Ralph C. Dorsey, Chairman of the K.H.S.A.A. Retire- 
ment Committee, made a report for his committee. 
After a discussion of the report, Mr. Dorsey moved, 
seconded by Foster J. Sanders, that the sum of $20,- 
000.00 be traiisferred from the K.H.S.A.A. General Fund 
to the K.H.S.A.A. Retirement B\md, this to be expanded 
on behalf of present and future employees of the Asso- 
ciation; and that the following resolution be spread on 
the minutes of the Board of Control: 

(Continued on Page Eight) 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1968 



The Flying Dutchman 



STATE CHAMPIONSHIP TENNIS TEAM 




As Uie Dutchman looks back over the many years 
he has penned this column for The Atihlete, there comes 
aji irresistible urge to count the many blessings which 
have come along the way. One such blessing will come 
from western Kentucky in a letter from somebody who 
got a lift from winning a Com Cob Pipe of Honor for 
unselfish service: another from the east, where a school 
acknowledges with pride tihe Abou Ben Adhem Award 
for the promotion of good neighbor practice, while stili 
another comes from a crippled kid who has received a 
Lionheart Award for overcoming a handicap to engage 
in sports. Writing this column has been most rewarding 
— and now Le.-dngton's J<Jhnnae Gettler contributes an- 
other. 

Johnnie asks that a Lionheart Award be sent to 
11-year-old' Joseph R. Carey. Although Joe has only 
one leg, he has been a Game Guy all of iiis hfe and is 
now even playing on a Little League team in Lexington. 
Joe has a tremendous attitude and is an inspiration to 
his teammates. May your tribe increase, Joseph Carey. 
Your award is on ttbe way. 

The sports program of the K.H.S.A.A. has contrib- 
uted greatly to happier living in Kentucky, and as 'the 
Dutchman reviews the past two decades it becomes 
obvious ithat America is moving toward a new horizon. 
That new horizon is recreation. Kentucky must keep 
pace and begin to move recreationally with our other 
progressive states. 

Many of our communities are recogrnzing the chang- 
ing times. They have seen the seventy-jhour work week 
replaced by one of forty hours. Our people have wel- 
comed labor-saving machinery but have been forced to 
accept with it an additional thirty hours of leisure time. 

Our thinking citizens are alert to the fact that ttiis 
time must be directed wisely or increased problems of 
both juvenile and adult delinquency will result. Already 
many are asking themselves, "Is it wiser to invest a 
dollar annually per capita in wholesome community 
recreation or spend a thousand times as much for bigger 
and better penal insUtuMons?" 

The answer may be on the new horizon. At any rate 
an increasing number of our nation's leaders feel that a 
glance in that direction may be well directed. 

The old horizon has changed! There was a time in 
our history when men worked from sunup to sundown — 



(Left to Right) Robert Richardson, Henry S. G. Hardy. Louis- 
ville Country Day state doubles championship team. (Inset) 
T. Cooper, St. Xavier, state singles champion. 



but no more. Our boys and girls are going to occupy 
their leisure hours wholesomely or otherwise. Our adults 
will do likewise. 

They are going to play because there are not enough 
jobs to go around and because the jobs which are avail- 
able leave lots of leisure time. Add to this the basic need 
we all have to "re-create" ourselves and the total result 
is the growing importance of good, clean public and 
private recreation. We can't determine if our people 
play but our civic leaders can determine where and how 
they play — and that's what is important. 

Communities are aware that people are living longer 
because of the progress of medical science. They have 
welcomed the miracle drugs which promise longer lives, 
but with them they are compelled to accept the leisure 
time problem of the aging. Employers have little to 
offer our senior citizens, meaning that the new horizon 
takes on greater significance. That word is "Re- 
Creation" not "Wreck-Reation." Our leaders know that 
our aging citizens must have recreational outiets for 
the re-creation of interests or mental illness will raise 
its ugly head. 

Maybe your community has already asked itself, 
"Should we invest a little in parks and recreation, or 
spend a lot on the construction of more mental institu- 
tions?" That answer may well rest on the new horizon. 
Certainly, our best thinkers are looking in that general 
direction. 

The old horizon has changed! No longer can our 
society afford to turn its back on the leisure time prob- 
lem of the aging by allowing the declining years to 
become a desolate, dreary twihght lived in a fog of 
misery. Recreation has proven itself one of our finest 
itherapies in the prevention and treatment of mental 
illness. People who are unwanted and unoccupied be- 
come costly mental cases. We have a decision to make. 
What can we best afford— recreation or increasing cases 
of mental illness? 

Kentucky's governmental leaders are exerting su- 
preme effort to induce new industries to locate in the 
communities of our Commonwealth. It is a well-known 
fact that industrial leaders check park and recreational 
opportunities of communities before locating plants or 
factories. Several dozen Kentucky towns failed to attract 
industry during the past decade because they lacked 
parks and recreation programs. Industry and recreation 
are like love and marriage. "They go together like a 
(Continued on Page Nine) 



I 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 190S 



Page Five 



Kentucky High School Baseball Tournament 

Sports Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 

June 5-7, 196t 



Mayfield {4j 



Russell County (1) 



Southern (1) 



Greensburg (0) 



Owensboro (2) 



Mayfield (0) 






Southern (0) 


Southern (2) 





Newport Catholic (3) 



Newport Catholic (1) 



Paul G. Blazer (6) 
Madison Central (0) 



Paul G. Blazer (3) 



Paul G. Blazer (1) 



Paul G. Blazer 
Champion 



All-Tournament Team 

lb-Tim Huff, Paul Blaier 
2b-Bob Mefford, Southern 
3b-John Walker, MajfieU 
ss-Dom Simms, Southern 
of-Richard Chowning:. Southern 
of-Steve Mason, Newport Cath. 
of-Joe Conley, Paul Blazer 
c-Steve HemlepD, Pa'i' Blazer 
p-Bob Lynch. Paul Blazer 
p-Mike Riffe, Southern 



Thirty-Fifth Annual Kentucky High School Tennis Tournament 

Louisville, May 31-Jun« 1, 19M 
SINGLES 



Cooper-St. Xavier 


QUARTER- 
FINALS 

— Cooper 
1 6-1; 6-0 


SEMI- 
FINALS 

Cooper 
6-2; 6-2 


FINALS 

Cooper 
6-2; 6-2 




Coulter-Western 
Richardo-Glasgow 


Strickler 
1 4-6; 6-1; 6-4 




Glasser 
7-5; 6-3 




Strickler-Foundation 


Glasser 
1 6-2; 9-7 




RothfuSi-Bellevue 


Davis 
8-6; 6-1 




Glasser-University 


1 




Shafferman 
1 6^; 6-3 


Clay-Henry Clay 


Roberts 
6-0; 6-0 


Shafferman-Owensboro 
Roberts-Trinity 


Roberts 
— 6-3; 6-1 


Algood-Henderson 


1 

— i Weller 
1 6-4; 8-6 


Weller-Middlesboro 
Taylor-Western 


Davis 
&0; W) 


1 

— Thomas 

6-4; 2-6; 6-4 


Murray-Henry Clay 
Thomas-Bellevue 






Davis 
6-0; 6-1 




Cohan-Atherton 






Davis-Westport 







Cooper 

4-6; 6-4; 6-2 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1968 



Louisville Country Day 
Tompkinsville 
Western 
Covington Catholic 



Somerset 



Hen;y Clay 



Meade County 



St. Xavier 



DOUBLES 



SEMI- 
FINALS 



_ Louisville Country Day 
I 6-0; 6-3 



_ Western 
I 6-2; 6-4 



Henry Clay 
6^; 6-3 



St. Xavier 
6-2; 6-0 



FINALS 



LtHBSviHe Country Day 
e-3; &^2 



St Xavier 
fr^2; 6-2 



Louisville Country Day 
6-2; 6-4 



AUDIT 

(Continued from Page One) 

Meals (State Tournament) 1,593.00 

Ticke Sellers and Takers 

(State Tournament) 70.00 

Lodging (State Tournament) 1,350.00 

Public Address Announcers 84.52 

Scorer (State Tournament) 25.00 

Umpires (State Tournament) 747.50 

Expenses-Ass't Manager (State 

Tournament) 65.00 

Groundsmen (State Tournament) 35.00 

Miscellaneous Expenses (State 

Tournament 15.00 9,172.0S 

Cross Country: 

Mileage and Local Entertainment 

(State Meet) 1.080.50 

Trophies and Awards 1,373.80 

Expenses-Regional Meets 14,43 

Expenses-State Meets 110.05 2.578.78 

Football Playoffs: 

Printing 88.70 

Trophies and Awards 971.47 

Transportation 485.00 

Lodging 300.00 

Meals 950.00 

Field Rental-Refund on Labor 1,350.00 

Officials 402.44 

Ticket Sellers, Takers & Guards 220.00 

Miscellaneous 117.95 

Footballs 119.70 

Statisticians 226.97 

Incidental Expenses-Board Grant 5,600.00 

Special Police 168.15 

Honorarium & Expenses- 
Game Managers 250.00 11,250.38 

Rifle Marksmanship: 

Mileage and Local Entertainment 

(State Tournament) 364.30 

Trophies and Awards 83.99 

Officials (State Tournament) 135.00 583.29 

Wrestling : 

Expenses-State Committee 340.96 

Trophies & Awards (State Tour.) 601.49 

Officials (State Tournament) 180.00 

Mileage and Local Entertainment 

(State Tournament) 1,150.15 

Miscellaneous Expenses (State Tour.) 462.50 

Printing 20.25 

Rentals (State Tournament) 200.00 

Custodial Service (State Tournament) 50.00 

Police (State Tournament) 48.12 

Refunds on Regional Tournament 

Deficits 71.50 3.124.97 

Gymnastics: 

Expenses-State Committee 279.75 

Trophies and Awards 221 60 

Officials (State Meets) 245.00 

Mileage and Local Entertainment 

(State Meets) 430.05 

Miscellaneous Expenses (State Meets) 49.80 1.226.20 



Total Disbursements 

Receipts- 

Diabnrsements 



Cash Balance 

BANK RECONCILEMENT 

Balance per Bank Statement, June 30, 1968 

Less Outstanding Checks 

No. 800 $ 10.80 

No. 989 25.00 

No. 1118 65.50 

No. 1179 13.10 

No. 1198 102.50 

No. 1201 32.50 

No. 1204 66.00 

No. 1267 34.84 

No. 1294 2.00 

No. 1295 110.35 

No. 1297 168.03 

No. 1298 256.80 



_$267,785.93 
.$282,737.10 
_ 267,785.93 

$ 14,951.17 
$ 15,838.59 



887.42 



True Bank Balance June 30. 1968 $ 14.951.17 

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
1968 STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 
RECEIPTS: 

Ticket Sales $218,753.00 

Profit on Programs 5,278.75 

Radio and TV Fees 6,886.50 $230,898.25 



DISBURSEMENTS: 

Printing 

Trophies and Awards _ 

Postage 

Infinrance 

Incidental Expenses (16) Teams 

Transportation — _ 

Lodging 

Meals — _ _ _ 


1,317.11 
717.71 
250.00 
1,641.00 
8,000.00 
1,588.80 
5,104.68 
7,401.46 




9,122.42 


Organist 

Officials* Fees and Expenses 


60.00 

1.880.44 
660.00 


Shot Chart Keepers & Statisticians 

Ushers ^ 


460.00 
2,955.00 


Ticket Sellers, Ticket Takers & Guards __ 
Public Address Announcers 


4,784.00 
255.00 


Films 


385.00 


Towel Service 

Miscellaneous Expenses-Tournament Mgr. 
Honorariums and Expenses- 
Ass't Tournament Managers _ 

State Sales Tax _ 


170.00 
93.75 

1,432.28 
6,432.32 


Bad Check 


16.00 $54,726.97 



Transfer of Funds-Amount Transferred 

to K.H.S.A.A. as Tournament Profit $176,171.28 

1967-*8 K.H.S.A.A. RETIREMENT FUND 
RECEIPTS: 

Balance July 1. 1967 $ 3,637.93 

Transferred from K.H.S.A.A. 

General Fund 31,500.00 

Int. Received from Certificate 

of Deposit-Central Bank 250.00 $ 35.387.93 



(Continued on Page Nine) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST. 19e6 



Page Seven 



St. Xavier Golf Team Is Best 




(Left to RJRht) T. Brown, T. Reverman. Coach Marty Donlon, 
L. Hovillion. G. Gahm. (Inset) S. Russell, Allen County, indi- 
vidual champion. 

The St. Xavier High School golf team won the 1968 
State Tournament, held at the Lindsey Golf Course, 
Fort Knox, on IVIay 21-22, Stacy Russell of Allen County. 



with a score of 147. was the individual winner. 

Scores of the leading teams were: St. Xavier. 628; 
Russell. 635; Washington County, 638; Louisville Country 
Day. 640; Tates Creek, 644; Owensboro. 645; Danville. 
G53; Paul G. Blazer, 651; Bowling Green, 662; Butler, 
664. 

Ina'ividual scores of some of tihe tournament leaders 
were: 

147-Russell (Allen County) 

150-Graham (Hopldnsville) 

151-Wilson (Valley) 

153-McGill (Owensboro). Knight (MaysviUe) 

154-iVlcKinney (Country Etey), Douglas (Hazard). 
Taylor (IVIurray) 

155-Ford (DcmvuDe). Evans (Mt. Sterling), Brown 
(St. Xavier), Barber (Russell) 

156-Houillion (St. Xavier), Bump (Russell), Thomas- 
son (Russell), Hudson (Washington County), Hurley 
(Covington Catholic) 

157-Gahm (St. Xavier) 

158-Mills (Union County), Macklin (Washington 
County) 

159-IVIiddleton (Country Day), Lear (Tates Creek), 
Nicholas (Owensboro) 

160-Hamipton (Butler), Scifres (University Breckin- 
ridge). Barnhart (Tates Creek), Reverman (St. Xavier) 



Ninth Annual Kentucky High School Tennis Tournament For Girls 

Central Park, Louisville, AAay 31-June 1, 1968 
SINGLES 



McGuire-Sacred Heart 


QUARTER- 
FINALS 

McGuire 
i 6-0; 6-0 


SEMI- 
FINALS 

McGuire 
6-1; 6-1 




Goodpaster-Paul Blazer 
Jennings-Bell evue 


1 

Jennings 
i G-1; 6-1 


FINALS 


Bargo 
6-2; 6-1 


McGuire 
6-1; 6-3 


Ross-Caverna 


Taylor 
i 6-2; 6-0 


Taylor-Somerset 


Sequra 
6-2; 8-6 


Goodykoontz-Southern 


Bargo 
6-1; 6-0 


Rowlett-Murray 


Sequra. 
7-5; 7-5 




Bargo-Ehzabefchtown 


Sequra 
(default) 




Sequra-Sacred Heart 


Vaughn-Henderson 


Porter 
6-2; 6-4 


Montgomeo'-Central 


Burton 
3-6; 6-1; 6-0 


Porter-Georgetown 


Lindstrom 
8-6; 6-2 


Hogue-Hart Memorial 




Llndslrom- 




FrankUn-Simpson 


Burton 

(default) 








Joihnson-Lloyd 






Burton-Paul Blazer 







McGuire 
6-3; 6-1 



Page Eight 


THI 


: KE 


NTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL A 


.THLETE FOR AUGUST, 1968 


Presentation 


TENNIS 

SEMI- 
FINALS 


DOUBLES— GIRLS 
FINALS 




Elizabethtown 


j 9-7; 6-4 








1 




presentation 
64; 6-2 






BeUevue 
1 GA- 6-4 




Hopkins ville 






Bellevue 
Holy Rosary 


1 

Holy Rosary 






Tates Creek 
7-5; 6-2 








1 6-1; 6-3 








Paul Blazer 


1 




Taites Creek 
6-2; 6-1 






Taites Creek 
1 G-1; 6-2 




Campbellsville 






Tales Creek 


1 















Campbellsville Girls Win Again 




(Left to Right) D. Holland. Coach Walter McHargue. K. Beard 
(individual champion). C. McCubbin, O. Faulkner. 

The fourth K.H.S.A.A. State Golf Tournament for 
Girls was heW at the OampbellsviUe Country Club Golf 
Course on May 21-22. Kaye Beard, shooting a one-over- 
par 77 on her home course, led her team to its secincJ 
straight team title. She posted a 36-hole score of 162, 
giving her a third (iiamirionship in four years of trying. 
The Campbellsville Higji Sdiool team score was 745, 
Bowhng Green High School being second with 764. The 
tournament was managed by Miss Matilda Walker of 
Westport High School. 

Eight full teams competed in the tournament, having 
qualified in regional competition. These teams and their 
scores were: CampbeUsvUle 745; Bowling Green 764; 
Waggener, 775; Owensboro High School, 844; Frankfort, 
870; London, 913; Qark County, 923; Westport, 937. 

Individual scores of some of the tournament leaders 
were: 

162-Beard (Campbellsville) 

169-Wel3h (Madison Central) 

174- Johnson (Owensboro CathoHc) 

179-Pitchford (Scoltsville) 

182-Dean (Bowling Green) 

I'SS-Burns (Waggener) 

185-Orr (Bowling Green) 

187-HoUand (CampbeUsviUe) 

188-Cox (Waggener), Hodge (Elizabethtown) 



Minutes of Board Meeting 

(Continued from Page Three) 

RESOLVED 1) that Theo. A. Sanford, Secretary- 
Treasurer of the Kentucky High School Athletic Associa- 
tion, continue to have authority to deposit and invest 
the funds of the Kentucky High School Athletic Associa- 
tion, including checking accounts, savings accounts, and 
retirement funds, with the First Security National Bank 
and Trust Company, The Central Bank and Trust Com- 
pany, and the Bank of Commerce, all of Lexington; the 
First Federal Savings and Loan Association, and the 
Lexington Federal Savings and Loan Association, both 
of Lexington; the Union Federal Savings and Loan Asso- 
ciation of Henderson; and other depositories of K.H.S. 
A. A. funds selected by the Secretary -Treasurer in the 
future, with the approval of the Board of Control; 

2) ithat Theo. A. Sanford is hereby auUiorized to sign 
on behalf of the K.H.S.A.A. any and ail checks and 
other instruments and (orl orders for the payment and 
(or) withdrawal of any and all monies, credits, items 
and property at any time held by said banks and loan 
associatians mentioned above; 

3) that all foregoing authority invested in said 
officer shall continue until a certified copy of a resolu- 
tion of tMs Board of Control, revoking said authority, 
is filed with the said banks and/or loan associations 
mentioned above. 

The motion was carried unanimously. 

Don Davis presented to the Board the 1968-09 
K.H.S.A.A. budget, previously recommended to his 
committee by the (Commissioner, the budget being 
amende(J to include the salary raises recommended by 
the Policy and Budget Committee. The estimated re- 
ceipts are $203,700.00, and the estimated disbursements 
are $202,025.00. Oran C. Teater moved, seconded by 
Preston Holland, that the 1968-69 budget as presented 
be adopted. The motion was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner stated that in his opinion a refer- 
endum should be sent to Association member schools, 
relating to solving the problem of Basketball Rule 1-14 
with Which members of the Board of Control, adminis- 
trators and coaches were quite familial'. Foster J. San- 
ders moved, seconded by Morton Combs, that the follow- 
ing proposed change in the K.H.S.A.A. Constitution be 
submitted to K.H.S.A.A. member schools for a referen- 
dum vote, this to be an added paragraph to Article IV, 
Section 3-d, of the K.H.S.A.A. Constitution: "Have 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 19&3 



Page Nine 



authority to amend the playing rules for any sport 
sponsored by the Association." The moition was carried 
unanimously. 

It wa.i the suggestion of Board members that the 
Association prepare programs in Track and Baseball 
for distribution during the time of the state events in 
these sports. 

Don Davis moved, seconded by Oran C. Teatc:, that 
the expense? of Edgar McNabb, K.H.?,A.A. representa- 
tive on the National Alliance Football Committee, be 
paid to the forthcoming annual meeting of the National 
Federation. The motion was carried unanimously. 

Preston Holland moved, seconded by Foster J. San- 
ders, that all bills of the Association for the period 
beginning April 1, 1968, and ending May 31, 1968; be 
allowed. The motion was carried unarumously. 

There being no further business, the meeting was 
adjourned. 



AUDIT . . . 

(Continued from Page Six) 

DISBURSEMENTS: 

SavinEs Account-lst Federal 

Savings & Loan Ass'n $ 3.500.00 

Certificate of Deposit- 
Central Bank & Trust Co. 10.000.00 

Savings Account-lst Security Nat'l 

Bank & Trust Co. 20,000.00 

Insurance Premiums 1.. 572.6.5 35,072.65 

S 315.28 

Receipts $ 35.387.93 

Disbursements 35,072.65 

Cash Balance $ 315.28 

ASSETS: 

Cash Balance-First Security Nat'l Bank & Trust Co.$ 315.28 

Certificate of Deposit-Central Bank & Trust Co. 10,000.00 

Savings Account-lst Fed. Savings & Loan Ass'n 3,609.y9 

Savings Account-lst Security Nat'l Bank & Trust Co. 20.052.20 

Total Retirement Fund Assets $33,977.47 

TOTAL ASSETS 

Funds on Hand : 

Cash Balance-First Security Nat'l Bank 

& Trust Co. $ 14,951.17 

U. S. Savings Bonds (value. June 30, 1968) 82.560.00 

Savings Certificate-Central Bank & Trust Co. 10.000.00 
Savings Certificates- 

1st Security Nat'l Bank & Trust Co. 60.000.00 

Savings Account-lst Federal S. & Loan Ass'n 10.000.00 

Savings Account-Union Fed. S. & L. Ass'n 10.000.00 

Savings Account-Lexington Fed. S. & L. Ass'n 10. 000. 00 

Retirement Fund Assets 33.977.47 

Total Funds on Hand. June 30. 1968 $231,488.04 

Estimated Value of K.H.S.A.A. Building & Equipment 101.380.75 

Total K.H.S.A.A. Assets $332,869.39 

THE FLYING DUTCHMAN 

(Continued from Page Four) 

horse and carriage." If your community is courting 
industry, possibly your leaders have already asked 
themselves, "Should we not invest in parks and recrea- 
tion to qualify for the dividends of industry?" 

The horizon has changed! Communities, desiring 
industrial development, must face facts. We are living 
in an age of competition. Whether we Uke it or not, our 
changing times are making competitors of us all. If 
your community wants a factory, it must be prepcired 
to compete with other communities Which are bidding 
for the same industry. 

Because we are all now compelled to compete, high 
school athletic programs become increasingly impor- 
tant — so let's make Kentucky's the greatest. 



K.H.S.C.A. 

Minutes of Annual Meeting 

The jmnual meeting of the Kentucky High School 
Coachej Association was held on April 18, 1968, in 
Room 204, Convention Center in Louisville. The number 
in attendance was 110. 

The meeting was called to order by President Don 
Morris at 1:10 p.m. Coach Tommy Long of Allen County 
gave the invocation. 

As the minutes of the meeting are published in the 
Athlete, the official publication of the Kentucky High 
Schooi Athletic Association, it was voted that the min- 
utes ncit be read before the assembly. 

Secretary-Treasurer Joe Ohr gave a complete finan- 
cial report. 

Ccach Guy Strong, head basketball coach at Eastern 
Kentucky University, was presented to the members. In 
his talk Strong emphasized that coaches be loyal to the 
Coaches Association and that each coach become an 
active rather than a passive member. He congratulaited 
the Kentucky coaches for the jobs they were doing in 
athletics. Strong summarized his talk by challenging 
each coach to self-evaluate himself with these ques- 
tions: 

1. Are you satisfied? 

2. Are you doing your own coaching? 

3. Are you working harder than the other coaches? 

4. Are you upgrading your job? 

5. Are you looking for excuses? 

6. Ai'e you pampering your boys? 

7. Are you selling your program to the public? 

8. Are you motivating your boys? 

9. Are you coaching sports or are you coaching 
boys? 

Strong stated that "if you can answer these ques- 
tions positively, these is no limit to what you can do as 
a coach." 

The vice president of the K.H.S.C.A., Coach "Butch" 
Gilbert of Glasgow, presented the Coach of Year in 
Football award for 1967 to the Ashland High School 
coach. Jack Hallum. In his acceptance talk Hallum 
reported that 10 of ithe Ashland squad had received 
sc'^olarships. 

The basketball coach of the year for 1967-68 was 
Coach Jim Richards of Glasgow High School, wmner 
of the 1988 state championship. The presentation was 
made by President Don Morris. 

In the election of officers. Coach Vince Hancock, 
football mentor of Elizabethtown High School, defeated 
Irvin Spencer of Valley High School for sergeant-ajt- 
arms for 1968-69. 

Joe Ohr was reelected secretary-treasurer for 1969- 
70. Following the election, Fred Clayton, who is football 
coach at Caldwell County, and the retiring president, 
was presented a plaque by Vice President Gilbert. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:15 p.m. 



REPORTS OF AUDIT 

Irvine, Kentucky 
April 17. 1968 
Executive Committee 

Kentucky Hig:h School Coaches Association 
Louisville, Kentucky 
Gentlemen : 

At the request of your Association Secretary & Treasurer, 
I have examined the records furnished to me by Mr. Ohr for the 
period Feb-uary 9, 1967. to February 24, 1968. 

Ccnsolidated and rlass'fied receipts and disbursements are 
shown on the attached schedule of receipts and disbursements. 
All receipts have been traced into the Bank Account and all 
disb'Tsements have been substantiated by canceled checks. 

The balance of §10,110.12 has been confirmed as being on 

( Continued on Page Fifteen ) 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1968 



KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL TRACK MEET-CLASS A 
LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, MAY 18, 1968 
Bellevue High School Track Team-K.H.S.A.A. Champion 1968 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Coach Ben Pumphrey, C. Rapp, M. Maline, J. Tierney, D. Walz, M. Reynolds, Coach David Grim. 
Second Row: Mpr. S. Romo. D. demons, J. Riddle, B. Pumphrey, T. Ryder, S. Sprague. 



100 Yard Dash— 

1. Pai-ks-Harrodsburg 

2. Sprague-Bellevue 

3. Echols-Fort Campbell 

4. Lewman-L'ville Country Day 

5. Narramone-Jenkins 

Time-10.0 
220 Yard Dash— 



Parks-Harrodsburg 
Echols-Fort Campbell 
Narramore-Jenkins 
Rodgers-Bardstown 
Kawaja-Paintsville 



Time-22.S 
440 Yard Dash— 

1. Lewman-L'ville Country Day 

2. Sprague-Bellevue 

3. Reiff-Ky. Military Inst. 

4. Mays-Washington County 

5. Wood-HiseviUe 

Time-50.8 
880 Yard Run— 

1. Lewman-L'ville Country Day 

2. Mays-Washington County 

3. Clemons-BeUevue 

4. Ryskiewicz-Lexington Catholic 

5. Curlin-Trigg County 

Time-2:01.3 
Mile Run— 

1. Daffron-Monticello 

2. Wade-Mercer County 



3. Nanny-Murray 

4. Ryder-BeUevue 

5. Richard-Russellville 

Time4:33.0 

2 Mile Run— 

1. Upchurch-MonticeUo 

2. Wade-Mercer County 

3. Zeger-.tenkins 

4. Curspton-Raceland 

5. Martin-Trigg County 

Time-9:58.3 
120 Yard High Hurdles— 

1. Tierney-Bellevue 

2. Stewart-Harlan 

3. Ernst-Lexington Catholic 

4. Allen-Bardstown 

5. Crites-Murray 

Time-15.0 
180 Yard Low Hurdles— 

1. Stewart-Harlan 

2. Tierney-Bellevue 

3. Brunegroif-Montgomery Co. 

4. Smi'th-Hlseville 

5. Weber-Louisville Country Day 

Time-20.T 
880 Yard Relay— 

1. Keral.ucky Militai-y Inst. 

2. BeUevue 

3. Fort CampbeU 

4. Kentucky School for Deaf 



b. Caverna 



Time-1:34.0 



Mile Relay — 

1. Bellevue 

2. Lexington Catholic 

3. Kentucky School for Deaf 

4. Fort Campbell 

5. Caverna 

Time-3:33.7 
Shot Put— 

1. Bushong-Tompkinsville 

2. Toth-Jenkins 

3. Riddle-BeUevue 

4. GilUspie-Berea 

5. Allen-Paris 

Distance-5r2y2" 
Pole Vault- 

1. DesCombes-Millersburg Mili- 

tary Inst. 

2. Jones-Trigg County 

3. Pumphrey-Bellevue 

4. C^nley-Jenkins 

5. Miller-Temple Hill 

Heisht-13'1%" 
High Jump — 

1. Ernst-Lexington Catholic 

2. Riddle-BeUevue 

3. Womack-Prichard 

4. Farris-Hazel Green 

5. Dunagan-Monticello 

Height-6' 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1903 



Page Eleven 



Triple Jump — 



Long Jump — 

1. Rogers-Bards ;own . 

2. F^imphrey-Bellevue 

3. Womack-Prichard 

4. Ernst-Lexington Catholic 

5. Kirksey-Harlan 

Distance-22'%" 
TOTAL POINTS 

Bellevue 49 

Lexington Catholic 17 

Harlan 17 

Loaisville Country Day 15 

Bardstown 14 

Monticello 13 

Harrodsburg 12 

Fort Campbell 12 

Millersburg Military Inst. 10 

lenkins 10 

Prichard 9 

Kentucky Military Inst. 9 

rompkinsville 9 



DLcus — 



Muse-Harlan 
Rogers-Bardstovvn 
Womack-Prichard 
Pumphrey-Bellevue 
Sexton-Mercer County 

Distance-44'3" 



1. Ward-Providence 

2. Nagy-Millersburg Military 

Inst. 

3. Bushong-Tompkinsville 

4. Fyffe-Flat Gap 

5. Gillispie-Berea 

Distance-142'7" 



Mercer County 9 

flurray 7 

Providence 6 

friffgr County 6 

Washington County 6 

Kentucky School for Deaf - 5 

irliseville 3 

IVlontgomery County 3 

Caverna 2 

[taceland 2 

riazel Green 2 

Paintsville 1 

Paris 1 

Russellville : 1 

Temple Hill 1 



KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL TRACK MEET-CLASS AA 

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, MAY 18, 1968 

Paducah Tilghman High School Track Team-K.H.S.A.A. Champion 1968 




(Left to Right) Front Row: E. Hank. .1. I.. WiU.in. I.. ( rcKkctt, H. Shulman, R. Jones, B. Littlejohn. Second Row: D. Reber, 
B. Page, D. Harriford. R. Nichols. 1). Watkins. W. Hughes, .1. Hines. N. Humphrey. Third Row: R. Holland, B. Wooley, D. Hay- 
den, L. Roof, B. Eaton, I). Linville. 



100 Yard Dash— 

1. Weloh-Elizabethtown 

2. Brown-Owensboro 

3. Crockett-Paducah Tilghman 

4. Foster-Lafayette 

5. McMannon-Newport Catholic 

Time-10.0 



223 Yard Dash— 

1. Gray -Danville 

2. Crockett-Paduoahi Tilgiiman 

3. Smi'h-Owensboro 

4. Reed-St. Joseph 

.'). McMannon-Newport Catholic 
nme-22.6 



140 Yard Dash— 

1. Gray-Danville 

2. Hayden-Paducah Tilghman 

3. Smith-Owensboro 

4. Reed-St. Joseph 

5. Hagsten-Paul Blazer 
Time-50.1 



Page Ttt^elve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1968 



S80 Yard Run— 

1. Johnson-Bryan Station 

2. Shulman-Paducah Tilghmsn 

3. John-Paul Blazer 

■1 Marshall-Boone County 

5. McLevain-Henderson County 

Time-1:58.8 
Mile Run— 

1. DeVoto-Newport Oatiiolic 

2. Woods-Shelby County 

3. Lewis-Glasgow 

4. Mitchell-Bryan Station 

5. Humphrev-Paducah Tilghnian 

Time-4:23.9 
2 Mile Run— 

1. Nichols-Elizabethtown 

2. Dawson-DanviUe 

3. Haywood-Paul Blazer 

4. Bondi-Newport Catholic 

5. Staples-Glasgow 

Time-9:54.3 
120 Yard High Hurdles— 

1. White-Lafayette 

2. Collins-Somerset 

3. Valentine-Franklin-Simpson 

4. McMannon-Newport Cathohc 

5. Baynham-Christian County 

Time-14.T 
180 Yard Low Hurdles— 

1. White- Lafayette 

2. MaMannon-Newport Catholic 



3. Barnes-Henderson County 

4. Collins-Somerset 

5. Valentine-Franklin-Simpson 

Time-20.3 
880 Yard Relay— 

1. Owensboro 

2. Bryan Station 

3. Paducah TDghman 

4. Paul Blazer 

5. Elizabethtown 

Time-l:31.3 
Mile Relay— 

1. Bryan Station 

2. Owensboro 

3. Paducah Tilghman 

4. Newport Catholic 

5. Glasgow 

Time-3:23.0 
Shot Put— 

1. Stuart-Glasgow 

2. Morgan-Daviess County 

3. Erpenbeck-Covlngton Cathohc 

4. Gaebler-Bourbon County 

5. Davis-North Marshall 

Distance-62'11" 
Stuart set a new state record with his 
distance of 62'H". 
Pole Vault— 

1. Harriford-Paducah Tilghman 

2. Ahrman-Campbell County 

3. Gray-Harrison County 



4. Adams-Madison Central 

5. Baskett-Elizabethtown 

Height-13' 
High Jump — 

1. Shulman-Paducah Tilghman 

2. Brickler-Campbell County 

3. Simons-Shelby County 

4. Barnes-Henderson County 

5. Blankenship-Jessamine County 

Heighl-6'2?4" 
Long Jump— 

1. Talbott-Harrison County 

2. Vogel-St. Joseph 

3. Points-Newport 

4. Embree-LaRue County 

5. Baynham-Christian County 

Distanco-22'11" 
Triple Jump — 

1. Embree-LaRue County 

2. Hale-Bryan Station 

3. McMannon-Newport Cathohc 

4. Collins-Somerset 

5 .Baynham-Christian County 

Distance-44'H" 
Discus — 

1. Stuart-Glasgow 

2. Gaebler-Bourbon County 

3. Radford-Christian County 

4. Riggs-Shelby County 

5. Erpenbeck-Covington Catholic 

Distance-157'9%" 



TOTAL POINTS 

Paducah Tilghman 34 

Bryan Station 2'£ 

Newport Catholic 21 

Owensboro 20 

Glasgow 17 

Danville 16 

Lafayette 14 

Paul Blazer 9 

Shelby County 9 

Campbell County . 8 

Somerset 8 



LaRue County • 

St. Joseph t 

Bourbon County fi 

Christian County 6 

Henderson County 6 

Daviess County 4 

Franklin-Simpson 4 

Covington Catholic 4 

Newport 3 

Boone County 2 

Madison Central 2 

Jessamine County 1 

North Marshall 1 



KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL TRACK MEET-GIRLS 

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, MAY 18, 1968 

Louisville Male High School Track Team-K.H.S.A.A Champion 1968 



50 Yard Hurdles— 

1. Booth-Male 

2. Hall-Boyle County 

3. Elery-Thomas Jefferson 

4. Hockensmith-Franklin County 

5. Elstes-Paducah Tilghman 

Time-7.1 
880 Yard Run— 

1. Moorman-Owensboro 

2. Hardesty-Eastem 

3. Stringer-Male 

4. Irelana'-Sayre 

5. Green-Padueah Tilghman 

Time-2:24.4 
50 Yard Dash— 

1. Streeter-Male 

2. Wolfe-Paducah Tilghman 

3. Mahan-Paul Blazer 

4. Sanders-Oldham County 

5. Rogers-Bardstown 

Tmie-6.3 



440 Yard Run— 

1. Moorman-Owensboro 

2. Sanders-Oldham County 

3. Carruthers-Paducah "nigihnian 

4. Bradley-Boyd County 

5. Johnson-Frankfort 

Time-61.3 
100 Yard Dash— 

1. Houchens-Christian County 

2. LaRue-Henderson County 

3. Streeter-Male 

4. KeUey-Paul Blazer 

5. Mertens-Lexington OathoUc 

Tmie-11.4 
220 Yard Dash— 

1. Croney-Christian County 

2. Long-Male 

3. LaRue-Henderson County 

4. KeUey-Paul Blazer 

5. Hall-Boyle County 

Time-26.3 



70 Yard Hurdles— 

1. Booth-Male 

2. Hall-Boyle County 

3. Torian-Christian County 

4. Elery-Thomas Jefferson 

5. Berry-Henderson County 

Time-10.0 
440 Yard Relay— 

1. Paducah Tilghman 

2. Male 

3. Paul Blazer 

4. Eastern 

5. Bardstown 

Time-50.4 
880 Yard Medley Relay— 

1. Paducah Tilghman 

2. Owensboro 

3. Male 

4. Boyd County 

5. Eastern 

Time-1:54.3 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1968 



Page Thirteen 



Paducah Tilghman set a new state 
record with the time of 1:54.3. 

Shot Put— 

1. Taylor-Male 

2. Goode-Lone Oak 

3. Carmack-Oneida Inst. 

4. DeWalt-Thomas Jefferson 

5. Burton-Prichard 

Dlstance-37'3" 

Discus— 

1. McComis-Paul Blazer 

2. Thompson-Eastern 

3. Parker-Danville 

4. Shumpert-Paducah Tilghnian 

5. Lamb-Franklin-Simpson 

Distance-105'3" 



High Jump— 

1. Mann-Owensboro 

2. Jones-Paducah Tilghman 

3. Dennis-Loretto 

4. Rice-Boyd County 

5. Frazier-Lexington Catholic 

Height^'?" 

Long .lump — 

1. Hodge-Paducah Tilghman 

2. Oaudill-Paul Blazer 

3. Barnes-Somei'set 

4. Buck-Western 

5. Whitaker-Tates Creek 

5. Beriy-Henderson County 

Distance-16'3%" 

Hodge set a new state record with 
her distance of U'S'/j". 



75 Yard Dash— 

1. Streeter-Male 

2. Wolfe-Paducah Tilghman 

3. Cook-Eastern 

4. Black-Paul Blazer 

5. Rogers-Bal*dstown '■■■■'■• 

Time-8.9 
Streeter set a new state record with 
her time of 8.9. 
380 Yard Relay— 

1. Christian County 

2. Male 

3. Paul Blazer 

4. Durrett 

5. Boyle County 

Time-1:48.7 
Christian County set a new state rec- 
ord with the time of 1:48.7. 



TOTAL POINTS 

Male 51 

Paducah Tilghman 37 

Paul Blazer 23 

Owensboro 22 

Christian County 21 

Bastern 14 

Boyle County 10 

Henderson County SM: 

rhomas Jefferson 7 

Boyd County 6 

Oldham County 6 

Lone Oak 4 



Dneida Inst. 3 

Loretto 3 

Danville 3 

Sardstown 3 

Somerset 3 

iSayre 2 

Lexington Catholic 2 

Franklin County 2 

Western 2 

Durrett 2 

Frankfort 1 

Prichard . 1 

Franklin-Simpson 1 

fates Creek V~ 



Officials' Ratings on Sportsmanship of K.H.S.A.A. 
Member Schools in Basketball 1967-1968 



SCHOOL 

Adair County 

Adairville 

Ahrens Trade 

Allen County 

Alvaton 

Anderson County 

Annville Institute 

Atherton 

Auburn 

Auffusta 

Austin Tracy 

Hallard Memorial 

Uarbourville 

Bardstown 

Bath County 

Heechwood 

Belfry 

IJell County 

Bellevue 

Benton 

Berea 

Betsy Layne 

Bishop B rossart 

Bishop David 

Blaine 

Bloomfield 

Boone County 

Bourbon County 

Bowling Green 

Boyd County 

Boyle County 

Bracken County 

Breathitt 

Breckinridge County 

Bremen 

Bristow 

Brodhead 

Bryan Station 

Buckhorn 

Burgin 

Burnside 

Bush 











OTHER 


SCHOOL 


















COACH 




OFFICIALS 




CROWD 






TEAM 


E 


G F 


P 


E G F P 


E 


G F 


P 


E 


G F 


.56 


14 


4 





63 


11 


1 





54 


20 


1 





57 


15 


1 


42 


7 


1 





48 


1 








33 


15 


2 





41 


9 





29 


16 








33 


12 








26 


18 


1 





28 


16 


1 


39 


13 


3 


3 


48 


9 





1 


36 


19 


1 


2 


38 


17 


1 


22 


17 


2 


2 


32 


10 


1 





27 


14 


2 





31 


12 





40 


11 


2 





48 


4 


1 





38 


14 


1 





41 


11 


1 


25 


in 


3 





22 


12 


2 


2 


25 


10 


3 





22 


13 


2 


43 


19 


2 


4 


53 


12 


9 


1 


44 


23 





1 


46 


17 


5 


45 


7 


3 


3 


47 


9 


1 


1 


40 


18 








40 


17 


2 


57 


18 


4 





58 


18 


1 





37 


37 


2 


2 


40 


28 


6 


36 


12 








39 


9 








36 


12 








37 


11 





42 


13 


2 


1 


37 


21 








29 


22 


4 


3 


38 


18 


2 


44 


7 


4 


1 


47 


8 


1 





36 


17 


2 


1 


38 


15 


2 


33 


21 


1 


1 


39 


16 


1 





35 


19 


1 


1 


35 


19 


2 


43 


9 


1 


2 


44 


11 








40 


12 


2 


1 


42 


11 


1 


55 


28 


9 


2 


78 


15 








50 


38 


4 


2 


46 


43 


4 


46 


6 








48 


4 








45 


7 








47 


5 





25 


8 


4 


6 


36 


4 


2 


1 


24 


5 


11 


3 


29 


6 


6 


52 


21 


4 


3 


50 


25 


5 





35 


36 


8 


1 


37 


36 


6 


40 


1?. 


2 





43 


11 








37 


15 


■J 





39 


14 





33 


22 


2 


1 


38 


19 








35 


20 


3 





36 


19 


1 


39 


17 


2 


2 


42 


15 





1 


38 


19 





3 


39 


17 


1 


36 


19 


4 


1 


40 


16 


1 





25 


34 


1 





28 


25 


6 


41 


15 


1 


3 


44 


16 








37 


20 


2 


1 


36 


22 


1 


45 


3 


2 





46 


4 








42 


5 


3 





38 


8 


4 


41 


7 


1 





42 


7 








40 


9 








41 


8 





56 


16 


2 





60 


14 


n 





35 


32 


6 


1 


48 


22 


2 


74 


7 





n 


76 


5 








63 


16 





2 


68 


13 





41 


24 


3 


1 


49 


IS 


1 


1 


37 


24 


5 


3 


37 


25 


4 


34 


19 


6 


7 


4.'! 


15 


4 


9 


38 


19 


7 


2 


34 


17 


12 


46 


4 





1 


48 


3 








43 


7 


1 





42 


8 





47 


12 


2 





47 


13 


1 





41 


18 


2 





45 


15 


1 


40 


7 


1 


3 


44 


6 








37 


14 








40 


10 





43 


10 








43 


10 








35 


17 


1 





40 


13 





41 


19 


8 


?. 


47 


23 








39 


24 


4 


3 


37 


18 


8 


31 


8 


4 


1 


38 


5 


1 





28 


10 


3 


3 


30 


12 


2 


48 


16 


1 


1 


55 


U 








45 


21 








41 


24 


1 


45 


9 








44 


7 


?. 





39 


15 








41 


14 





13 


18 


7 


5 


26 


14 


3 





19 


19 


4 


1 


21 


13 


9 


28 


11 


6 


4 


38 


10 


1 





33 


10 


4 


2 


30 


12 


4 


55 


9 





4 


57 


11 








53 


7 


2 


6 


53 


10 


1 


44 


4 





1 


43 


6 








40 


8 


1 





41 


4 


. 4 



Page Fourteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1968 



Butler 

Butier County 

Caldwell County 

Calhoun 

Calloway County 

Campbell County 

Campbellsville 

Caney\ille 

Carlisle County 

Carr Creek 

Carroll County 

Carter 

Casey County 

Catlettsburg 

Caverna 

Central 

Central City 

Chandler's Chapel 

Christian County 

Clarkson 

Clay County 

Clinton County 

Combs Memorial 

Corbin 

Cordia 

Covinprton Catholic 

Crab Orchard 

Crittenden County 

Cub Run 

Cuba 

Cumberland 

Cumberland County 

Danville 

Daviess County 

Dawson Springs 

Dayton 

Deming- 

DeSales 

Dixie Heights 

Dorton 

Drakesboro 

duPont Manual 

Durrett 

Earlington 

East Hardin 

Eastern 

Edmonson County 

Elizabethtown 

Elizabethtown Catholic 

Elkhorn City 

Eminence 

Estill County 

Eubank 

Evarts 

Ezel 

Fairdale 

Fairview 

Falmouth 

Fancy Farm 

Farmington 

Feds Creek 

Ferguson 

Fern Creek 

Flaget 

Flaherty 

Flat Gap 

Fleming County 

Fleming Neon 

Fordsville 

Fort Campbell 

Fort Knox 

Foundation 

Frankfort 

Franklin County 

Franklin-Simpson 

Frederick Fraize 

Fredonia 

Fulton 

Fulton County 

Gallatin County 

Gamaliel 

Garrard County 

Garrett 

George Rogei-s Clark __ 

Georgetown 

Glasgow 

Good Shepherd 

Graham 

Grant County 

Greensburg 

Greenup 

Greenville 

Hancock County 

Harlan 

Han-ison County 

Hari-odsburg 



50 


13 


3 





53 


13 








40 1 


29 


20 


2 


3 


32 


20 


2 





27 1 


36 


12 


1 


2 


43 


7 


1 





38 1 


30 


22 


2 


3 


34 


19 


2 


2 


25 1 


28 


22 


3 


2 


40 


13 


1 


1 


28 1 


56 


32 


2 


3 


67 


23 


1 


2 


43 1 


47 


11 


1 


1 


53 


6 


2 





45 1 


43 


18 


7 


2 


57 


11 


1 





46 1 


26 


14 


1 


1 


30 


11 





1 


28 1 


40 


4 








40 


4 








36 


37 


14 








39 


12 








31 1 


53 


U 


2 


3 


59 


8 


1 


1 


50 1 


51 


6 








53 


4 








48 i 


35 


13 


1 





37 


12 








30 1 


36 


15 





2 


41 


12 








38 1 


37 


21 








34 


24 








28 1 


47 


10 





2 


49 


10 








40 1 


42 


10 





4 


48 


8 








38 1 


43 


26 


1 





47 


23 








34 1 


34 


12 


4 


2 


44 


7 


1 





39 1 


45 


16 


4 


6 


59 


10 


2 





43 


31 


13 


4 


6 


37 


17 








31 


28 


20 


5 


2 


36 


18 





1 


29 1 


44 


20 


2 


1 


54 


11 


2 





46 1 


33 


17 


8 


1 


42 


16 


1 





39 1 


37 


21 


5 


4 


43 


18 


1 


1 


30 1 


27 


18 


1 





34 


12 








24 1 


17 


14 


11 


8 


34 


12 


3 


1 


21 1 


50 


9 


2 


3 


54 


8 


2 





47 1 


20 


22 


3 


9 


41 


13 








29 1 


37 


5 


4 


2 


38 


T 


3 





35 


33 


9 


1 


3 


39 


5 





2 


34 


51 


3 


2 





54 


2 








48 1 


52 


25 


2 





54 


25 








48 1 


30 


18 


5 


2 


33 


22 


3 





30 1 


49 


25 


7 


1 


64 


15 


1 





50 1 


50 


4 


4 


1 


65 


3 


1 





45 1 


33 


21 


9 


6 


46 


17 


2 


3 


36 1 


58 


17 


1 


1 


61 


16 








45 1 


64 


7 


2 





69 


4 








58 1 


38 


15 


5 


4 


48 


12 


1 


1 


31 1 


30 


10 


5 





33 


12 








31 


45 


25 


3 





60 


12 


1 





41 


31 


29 


5 


5 


44 


26 








40 1 


48 


16 


1 


3 


50 


13 


3 


2 


42 1 


42 


21 








42 


21 








40 


36 


20 


3 


3 


43 


16 


3 





38 


37 


9 








39 


7 








35 


40 


10 


4 


1 


39 


12 


2 


1 


33 1 


48 


2 








48 


2 








43 i 


29 


8 





1 


30 


8 








24 1 


44 


10 


3 





49 


8 








47 


52 


13 








59 


6 








45 


49 


9 


2 


1 


50 


7 


3 


1 


36 1 


47 


13 





1 


51 


10 








46 1 


40 


23 


5 


2 


47 


20 


2 





37 1 


61 


20 


2 





61 


21 


1 





52 1 


44 


20 


5 


1 


49 


18 


2 





38 1 


32 


25 


2 





30 


27 


2 





23 1 


26 


11 








23 


14 








12 1 


44 


7 


2 


2 


46 


6 


2 


1 


37 1 


27 


10 


2 





29 


9 





1 


29 1 


40 


26 





2 


45 


21 


2 





34 1 


32 


18 


8 


6 


39 


20 


2 


1 


32 1 


46 


7 


1 


2 


45 


9 


1 


1 


42 I 


44 


8 


3 




48 


6 


3 





42 


46 


9 


1 





47 


9 








38 1 


33 


12 


3 





36 


12 








31 1 


49 


6 





2 


52 


5 








45 1 


23 


6 


1 





25 


4 


1 





20 


35 


9 


2 





37 


9 








34 


13 


10 


4 


1 


17 


11 








16 


50 


9 


1 





46 


14 








41 


44 


6 


2 





42 


10 








36 


40 


11 


2 





43 


9 


1 





33 


39 


14 


2 


2 


46 


10 





1 


37 


35 


15 


1 





33 


18 








23 


28 


12 


1 





27 


12 


1 





27 


16 


17 


4 





22 


14 


1 





16 


31 


15 


7 


6 


34 


21 


3 


1 


19 


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1 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST. 1903 



Page Fifteen 



Hart Memorial 

Hazard 

Hazel Green 

Hazel Green Academy 

Heath 

Henderson 

Hendei-son County 

Henderson Settlement 

Henry Clay 

Henry County 

Hickman County 

Highlands 

Hindman 

Hiseville 

Hitchens 

Holmes 

Holy Cross 

Holy Family 

Holy Name 

Hopkinsville 

Hughes-Kirk _- 

Hustonville 

Inez 

[roquois 

Irvine 

Jackson 

Jackson County 

James A. Cawood 

Jefferson town 

Jenkins 

Jessamine County 

Johns Creek 

Kentucky School for Deaf 

Kingdom Come 

Knott County 

Knox Central 

Lafayette 

LaRue County ^ 

Leatherwood 

Lebanon 

Lebanon Junction 

Lee County 

Le't-hfield 

Lesl'e County 

Letcher County 

Lewis County 

Lewisburg 

Lexington Catholic 

Liberty 

Lily 

Livermore 

Livingston 



34 


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9 



(Continued in September Issue) 



K.H.S.C.A. 

(Continued from Page Nine) 

deposit in the Union Bank & Trust Company. Irvine, Kentucky, 
as of the close of business on February 24, 1968. 

All records are maintained in good order and we believe the 
attached schedule properly reflects all transactions during the 
period covered. 

RespecfuUy submitted, 
William Sexton, Jr. 
Auditor 
KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL COACHES ASSOCIATION 
STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
FOR THE PERIOD February 9. 1967 to February 24. 1968 
RECEIPTS: 

Membership Dues $ 3,678.00 

Refund on Airline Ticket 286.65 

TOTAL RECEIPTS $ 3.964.65 

Plus: Bank Balance on February 8, 1967 10.596.22 

GRAND TOTAL $14,560.87 

DISBURSEMENTS: 

Expenses National Rules meetings __ 171.43 

Executive meetings 627.08 

Postage and Envelopes 130.00 

Secretarial Help 10.00 

KEA Delegate Expense 25.00 

Plaques 160.00 

Grant to Henry Smith 200.00 

Grant to Robert Page Fund 200.00 

Grant to "Tiny" Jones Fund 1,000.00 

Audit of Records 24.65 

Filing Fee to State Treasurer 2.00 

Clinic Speakers 300.00 

Travel Expenses 53.72 

Refund-Coaches Dues 14.00 

Flowers 26.27 

Treasurer's Bond 31.25 



Airline Tickets 573.30 

Telephone Expense 10.35 

Joe Ohr for Collection Fees 912.00 

Total Expenditures 4,471.05 

BALANCE ON FEBRUARY 24. 1968 $10,089.82 

Balance in Union Bank & Trust Company, Irvine, 

Ky., on February 24, 1968, per Bank Statement 10.110.12 

Difference 20.30 

Difference of $20.30 is Check No. 345 issued to Joe Ohr for 
executive meeting expense not yet cleared through Bank. 

Irvine. Kentnckv 
April 17. 1968 
Executive Committee 

East-West All Star Football & Basketball Games 
The Kentucky High School Coaches Association 
Louisville, Kentucky 
Gentlemen : 

I have examined the records ef the All Star account as 
furnished me by Mr. Joe Ohr. This examination covers the 
period April 1, 1967, to February 29, 1968. 

Consolidated and classified receipts and disbursements are 
shown on the attached schedule of receipts and disbursements. 
The bank balance of $18,120.15 has been verified as being on 
deposit in the First Security National Bank & Trust Company. 
Lexington, Kentucky. 

Total receipts of $11,979.00 have been verified as deposits 
into the bank and all d'sbursements have been substantiated by 
canceled checks. 

We have on this date verified by telephone the balances to 
your credit in the following Savings Accounts: 

a. Columbia Federal Savings & Loan Association 
Covington, Ky. Account No. 9315 

Balance as of 12-31-67 $ 5,160.60 

b. Central Bank & Trust Company 

Lexington, Ky. Cert. Deposit No. 5041 10,000.00 

c. Citizens Union National Bank & Trust Co. 

Lexington, Ky. Account No. 21230-8 

Balance as of 12-29-67 5,289.53' 



Page Sixteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1968 



Does Your Present Student 
Policy Cover Your Athletes? 
We Can Solve Your Problem. 



7<4e fCUKfden CampofUf general agent 



W. E. KINGSLEY 



121-123 LAFAYEHE AVENUE 
P. O. BOX 7100 



J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. 

Life Department 
LEXINGTON, KY. 40502 



CHARLES C. PRICE 



PHONE 254-4095 



[|. First Security National Bank & Trust Co. 
Lexinffton. Kentucky 

Balance as of April 17. 1968 10.685.27 

We believe the attached schedule and this letter properly 
reflect the transactions for the period covered and the pres- 
ent status of the All-Star Account. 

Respecfully submitted. 
William Sexton, Jr. 
Auditor 
EAST-WEST ALL STAR FOOTBALL & BASKETBALL 
(;.\MES OF THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL COACHES 
ASSOCIATION 
Statement of Receipts and Disbursements for the period 
April 1. 1967. o February 29. 1968 
RECEIPTS: 

Receipts from All-Star Games $11,479.00 

Interest on Savings Account No. .5041 250.00 
Interest on Savings Account No. 5041 250.00 

TOTAL RECEIPTS $11,979.00 

Plus: Balance in Bank on March 31, 1967 14.340.43 

(■RAND TOTAL $26,319.43 



DISBURSEMENTS: 

Meals for Players 2,346.01 

Pictures 73.12 

Team Traveling Expenses 844.45 

Printing 205.55 

Manager's Expenses 314.72 

Awards for Players 615.63 

Misc. Medical Expenses 33.12 

Kentucky Sales Taxes 338.10 

Change 1.200.00 

U.K. Athletic Association-Losses 184.78 

Insurance Expense 243.80 

Manager's Salary 800.00 

Coaches' Salaries 1,000.00 

Total Disbursements 8.199.28 

BALANCE ON FEBRUARY 29, 1968 $18,120.15 

Balance on deposit in First Security National Bank 
& Trust Company, Lexington, Ky., per Bank 
Statement of February 29, 1968 $18,120.15 



K.H.S.A.A. TRACK 


MEET 


5. Simpson-Seneca 




Discus — 


■^Continued from Inside Flront Cover) 


Distance-22'9" 
Triple Jump— 


1. Costanzo-Eastern 

2. Renfro-Male 


Long Jump — 




1. Holmes-Eastern 




3. Royalty-Pleasure Ridge Park 




2. Scrivener-Male 




4. Smith-Valley 


1. Scrivener-Male 




3. Provetjte-Manual 




5. Boone-DeSales 


2. Wolf-Butler 




4. MattLngly-DeSales 




Distance-167'U" 


3. Walker-Dun-ett 




5. Matthews-Atherton 




Costanzo se^ a new state record witli 


4. Matthews-Atherton 




Distance-44 


ZW 


his distance of 167'11". 



TOTAL POINTS 

Male 59 

Eastern 42'/- 

Ourrett 31 

DcSales 20 

Iroquois 13 

St. Xavier lOV- 

Flaret I "" II Ilie " 

Trinity If 



Valley 9 

Waeeener 8 

Butler 8 

Shawnee 6 

Atherton 6 

Pleasure Ridgre Park fi 

Central 5 

Seneca 4 

Westport 4 

Manual 3 

Thomas Jefferson 1 



I 



SUTCUfft'S IS READY 

with complete football, basketball 
and athletic eaaiptnent for the fall season 



No delay — no waiting — immediate delivery! Stock merchandise is 
shipped on the very day an order is received. 

We maintain and operate our own sewing, engraving, and service depart- 
ments, which enables us to render faster service. 




QUALITY BRANDS 

Our stocks this year are the SEime top 
quality for which Sutclitfe is now well 
known — nationally-distributed, nationally- 
advertised preferred quality brands. 



SUTCLIFFE'S SERVICE 

For on-the-spot service, the Sutcliffe School repre- • .j . 
sentative will contact you, as usual, during the year. ^* 

Write us about your needs. Remember we give one- \ ' 

day service. 





THEoUTCLIFFEco, 

INCORPORATED 

115 SOUTH 7th STREET., LOUISVILLE, KY. 



50 YEARS 
FOR ATHLETES 

In August, 1918, our founder, Bill Hunt, was asked to help secure some 
uniforms for a football team so they could tell the spectators from the 
players. 

For 50 years we at Hunt's have tried to serve the athletes by finding for 
them the best available equipment to serve their needs. 

Today we feature and can supply immediate delivery on merchandise for 
any athletic or physical education need from our warehouse. 

We have complete stock of the following items. 

Football Shoes raizes 1 to 14 

Basketball Shoes oiTes 1 to 17 

Football Pants sizes 22 to 52 

Football Jerseys riizes 4 to 50 

Football Shoulder Pads sizes Little League to 50 

Baskettall Jerseys liizes 10 to 50 

Basketball Pants sizes Little League to College 

Athletic Socks : izes 6 io 16 

Foottall Helmets sizes Boys Extra Small to 8 

Football — Rubber or Leather — Little League to Pro 

Basketballs — Indoor or Outdoor — Biddy to Pro 

Fair Play Scoreboards — Grade School to College 

First Aid for prevention or treatment 

We specialize in your problems. 

Next day delivery to any school in Kentucky. 

Call on our experience and service with your problems. 

In Mayfield, 247-1941 COLLECT, or Louisville 459-6366. 

One of us can help you. 

C. A. BYRN, Jr. — ROY BOYD — JIM MITCHELL 

WADE BURLESON — BILLIE FARMER — JENNY SIMPSON 

ELIZABETH RULE — NANNY LOU USERY — SONDRA POTTS 

HENRY BOMAR 



HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO, Inc. 

CH 7-1941 — PHONES — CH 7-1942 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 




K.H.S.A.A. SCHOOL FOR FOOTBALL OFFICIALS 




» • t f 




Above are area representatives who attended the School for Football Officials, held in Lexing- 
ton on August 2-3. They are: (Left to Right) Front Row — Tom Murray, Fort Mitchell; George 
Mercker, Louisville; School Director Edgar McNabb, Fort MitcheH; Bill Mordica, Ashland; 
Howard Moss, Paclucah; Bernard Johnson, Lexington. Second Row — Clyde Parsley, Provi- 
dence; E. B. May, Jr., Prestonsburg; Ray Canady, Barbourville; Kean Jenkins, EMzabeth- 
j-own; Paul Walker, Glasgow; Joe Russell, Russellville. 







Official Organ of the 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

September, 1968 




Football Districts and Regions 

The football districts and regions for 1968 
are as follows: 

Class AAA 

REGION I 

Atherton, Bishop David. Central. DeSales. duPont Manual, 
Flaget. Iroquois. Male. Shawnee, St. Xavier, Trinity 

REGION II 

District 1 — 

Butler, Fail-dale, Pleasui-e Ridge Park, Southern, Valley, 
Western 
District 2 — 

Durrett. Eastern. Fern Creek. Jeffersontown. Seneca, Thomas 
Jefferson, Waggrener, Westport 

Class AA 

REGION I 

District 1 — 

Bowling Green, Caldwell County, Christian County, Franklin- 
Simpson, Hopkinsville, Madisonville. Mayfield, Paducah Tilgh- 
man 
District 2 — 

Daviess County, Henderson, Henderson County, Ohio County, 
Owensboro. Owensboro Catholic, Union County 

REGION II 

District 1 — 

Breckinridge County. Elizabethtown, Fort Knox, LaRue 
County, Meade County, North Hardin, Oldham County, Shelby 
Countv 
District 2— 

Danville. Henry Clay, Jessamine County, Lafayette. Madison, 
Somerset. Woodford County 

REGION III 

District 1 — 

Boone County, Boyd County, Campbell County. Covington 
Catholic. Dixie Heights. Highlands, Holmes. Newport. Newport 
Catholic, Paul G. Blazer, Russell, Simon Kenton 
District 2 — 

Bourbon County. Bryan Station. Franklin County, George 
Rogers Clark, Harrison County, Madison Central. Tates Creek 

REGION IV 

District 1 — 

Bell County. Corbin, Cumberland, Evarts. James A. Cawood, 
Knox Central, Middlesboro. Whitley County 
District 2 — 

Belfry. Hazard. Leslie County. M. C. Napier, Prestonsburg, 
Whitesburg 

Class A 
REGION I 

District 1 — 

Crittenden County, Fort Campbell, Fulton. Fulton County, 
Murray, North Marshall, Russellville, Trigg County 
District 2 — 

Butler County. Campbellsville. Caverna. Cumberland rounty, 
Glasgow, Greensburg, Metcalfe County, North Warren, Tomp- 
kinsville. Wax-ren Central 

REGION II 

District 1 — 

Bardstown, Eminence. Henry County, K. M. I., Lebanon, 
Louisville Country Day, Old Kentucky Home, Shelbyville, Shep- 
herdsville, Washington County 
District 2 — 

Anderson, Berea, Boyle County, Burgin, Frankfort, Garrard 
County, Georgetown, Harrodsburg, Kentucky School for the 
Deaf, Mercer County, Sayre, Scott County, Stanford 

REGION III 

District 1 — 

Beechwood, Bellevue, Carroll County, Dayton, Falmouth, 
Lloyd Memorial, Ludlow, Owen County 
District 2 — 

Bath County, Fleming County, Maysville, M. M. I., Mont- 
gomery County. Mt. Sterling, Nicholas County, Paris, Rowan 
County 

REGION IV 

District 1 — 

Harlan, Hazel Green, Lily, London, Lynch, Lvnn Camp, 
Mt. Vernon, Pineville, Williamsburg 
District 2 — 

Catlettsburg, Elkhorn City, Fleming-Neon, Jenkins, Johns 
Creek, Louisa, McKell, Morgan County, Paintsville, Pikeville, 
Raceland, Wheelwright, Wurtland 



FILMS 

The films listed below are in the Film Library of the 
University of Kentucky College of Education. The code 
letters, "e, j, s, c, a," refer to elementary, junior high, 
senior high, college and adult audiences who may enjoy 
the particular film listed. The rental prices shown do 
not apply to schools which use one of the special sub- 
scription service plans offered by the Bureau of Audio- 
Visual Material. 

Football 

BALL HANDLING IN FOOTBALL, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $2.00. 

Fundamentals of ball handling are stressea; stance, 
grip, "feel" of the ball, fingertip cantrol adjustment 
before throwin,g or kicking, receiving passes from cen- 
ter or from a back, catching passes and punts, ways of 
carrying ball, and changing from one hand to another. 
Game shots are presented, using slow motion and stop 
action techniques, and superimposed animation to illus- 
trate principles. 
BLOCKING IN FOOTBALL, j-s-c, 1 reel, $2.00. 

Fundamentals of good blocking are taught in this 
film; position, speed, drive, follow-through, timing, and 
body control. Describes shoulder and body blocks, dem- 
onstrating several varieties of these. Importance of good 
physical condition, practice, and experience are empha- 
sized. Special photography used to illustrate different 
points. 
OFFICIAL FOOTBALL, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, $1.00. 

This film portrays the play situations covering the 
basic rules of football as played under the National 
Alliance Code. The theme is centered around the official 
interpretations of the mles as they apply to the three 
teams always present on the field, the home team, the 
visiting team and that all important third team, the offi- 
cials. 
TACKLING IN FOOTBALL, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $2.00. 

Tackling properly is shown as the result of applica- 
tion of certain fundamentals: good physical condition, 
speed, body placement, drive, sure grip, timing, and 
body control. Shoulder and cross body tackles are 
demonstrated in various ways, with special instructions 
for safety and means of reducing shock. 
THIS IS FOOTBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, $1.00. 

Centered around the four S's — science, speed, skill 
and safety. Demonstrations cover basic rules that will 
aid the official, coach, players, and fan. Play situations 
are used to establish standards. 

KNOW YOUR FOOTBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels (30 min.), 
color, $1.00. 

Gives a visual approach to the written rules. Play 
situations chadlenge the viewer's knowledge and clarify 
many rules interpretatiotns. Recommended for fans, 
officials, coaches and players. 



Attention, Principals! 

A list of registered football officials appears in this 
issue of the ATHLETE. Principals and coaches should 
study the current list to determine whether or not all 
officials with whom contracts have been signed have 
registered this fall. Supplementary lists of officials will 
appear in subsequent issues of the magazine. By-Law 22 
provides that member schools shall use registered offi- 
cials in all football and basketball games, and that fail- 
ure to comply with this regulation makes the home 
school liable for suspension. If there is any question 
about registration, the official should be asked to 
present his card. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXXI— NO. 2 



SEPTEMBER, 1968 



$1.00 Per Year 




Preston Holland 
President 



Ralph C. Dorsey 
Vice-President 



Veteran football coach Preston Holland, Assistant 
Superintendent of Murray City Schools, was elected 
president of the Kentucky High School Athletic Associa- 
tion's Board of Control in a meeting held on August 10, 
1968. Supt. Ralph C. Dorsey of the Caverna Independent 
School District, who retired from coaching a year ago 
after 22 years of experience, was named vice-president. 
The two men represent respectively Sections 1 and 3. 

Mr. Holland was born in Murray, Kentucky. He 
attended the Murray Grade School and Higih School, 
graduating in 1924. He received his A.B. Degree from 
Murray State College four years later, after having let- 
tered in football, basketball and baseball. He has done 
graduate work at the University of Kentucky, and he 
received his M.A. Degree from Murray State. 

Following his graduation from college, Mr. Holland 
was principal and coach at Almo High School for two 
years, after which he joined the Murray High School 
staff as coach of football, basketball, baseball and 
track. He has been at Murray since that time, currently 
being Athletic Director and Head Football Coach. His 
1961 football team won the Class A ohampionship. He is 
a past President of the Murray State Alumni Associa- 
tion. In baseball he organized the first little league in 
Kentucky, serving as state director for several years. 
In 1967 he received one of twelve awards for distin- 
guished service given by the National High School 
Athletic Coaches Association. He has been a K.H.S.A.A. 
director since 1961. For many years he was an Elder 
in the First Christian Church of Murray. 

Ralph C. Dorsey was born in Scottsville but has lived 
most of his life in Horse Cave. He graduated from 
Horse Cave High School in 1935, later attending Indiana 
University on a basketball scholarship and receiving his 
B.S. degree with a major in Physcial Education. 

After serving five years in the United States Army 
during World War II, Captain Dorsey returned to his 
home town emd served as a teacher and coach for four 
years. During this time he attended summer school at 
Western Kentucky State College and received his M.A. 
degree. 

The sectional representative lettered in basketball 
and baseball for four years in high school, and he 
received varsity basketball letters for three years at 



Indiana. He was twice an all-state high school player in 
Kentuck-y. From 1950 through 1954 he served as a 12- 
grade principal, and as basketball and baseball coach 
for the Caverna High School. He took his basketball 
team to the State Tournament twice. His baseball teams 
went to the State Tournament three times, winning the 
championship in 1961. For the past fourteen years he 
has served as Superintendent of the Caverna School 
District. 

Mr. Dorsey is an active member of the Horse Cave 
Methodist Church where he has served as Church School 
Superintendent, teacher and church lay leader. He is 
currently chairman of the church official boaixl. He 
belongs to the various educational associations at the 
local, state and national levels. He sei-ves actively in 
the Rotary Club and the Chamber of Commerce. He hais 
been honored as "Man of the Year" by the Horse Cave 
Chamber of Commerce. He is a member of the Caverna 
Memorial Hospital Board of Directors. For the past 
eighteen years he lias been secretary-treasurer of the 
Southern Kentucky Athletic Conference. He was Presi- 
dent of the Kentucky Coaches Association in 1962-63. 



Basketball Clinics 



The 1968-69 rules meetings for basketball officials 
and coaches will be conducted by veteran clinic director 
Charlie Vettiner. The dates and sites of the meetings 
are as follows: 

September 22, Somerset High School, 1:00 P.M. 

September 22, Middlesboro High School, 7:00 P.M. 

September 23, Hazard High School, 1:00 P.M. 

September 23, Prestonsburg High School, 7:00 P.M. 

September 24, Morehead State University, 1:00 P.M. 

September 24, Paul G. Blazer High School, Ashland, 
7:00 P.M. 

September 25, Newport High School, 1:00 P.M. 

September 25, Transylvania College, Lexington, 7:00 
P.M. 

September 29, Elizabethtown High School, 1:00 P.M. 

September 29, Daviess County High School, Owens- 
boro, 7:00 P.M. 

September 30, Tilghman High School, Paducah, 1:00 
P.M. 

September 30, Mayfield High School, 7:00 P.M. 

October 1, Madisonville High School, 1:00 P.M. 

October 1, Reservoir Hill, Rec. Center, Bowling 
Green, 7:00 P.M. 

*October 7, Kentucky Hotel, Louisville, 7:00 P.M. 

'-Indicates change in meeting site from that previ- 
ously annoimced iji letter to officials. 



Attention, Basketball Coaches! 

The dates and sites of the 1968-69 basketball cUnics 
are given on this page of the ATHLETE. Clinic attend- 
ance by head basketball coaches is required under the 
provisions of K.H.S.A.A. By-Law 29-3. Players and other 
members of the school's coaching staff are invited to 
attend the chnic. Basketball coaches are urged to 
bring their scorers and timers to the meetings. 



Page Two THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 

SEPTEMBER, 1968 VOL. XXXI— NO. 2 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky ^'^ iyi6IIlOria.IIl 

High School Athletic Association 
Office of Publication. Lexington, Ky. 40501 
Second class postage paid at Lexington. Kentucky. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor -. J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington. Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Preston Holland (1965-69), Murray 

Vice-President Ralph C. Dorsey (1966-70). Horse Cave 

Directors — Alvin Almond (1967-71), Bowling Green: Morton 

Combs (1968-72). Carr Creek: Don Davis (1967-71), Indcpend- J>v' 

cnce; James T. Dotson (1968-72). Johns Creek: Don R. Rawlings ii ' _»dfcr .<w ^ 

(1965-69). Danville: Foster J. Sanders (1966-70), Louisville. fT ^MMK. iwHwi 

Subscription Rate $1.00 per Year \ Z^' W KKm ff 



1968 



^lom the Commissione'i s CJffi 



ice 



Attention, Officials! 

The attention of all registered K.H.S.A.A. football, 
basketball and baseball officials is called to By-Law 29, 
Section 9, which provides that the officials shall be 
supplied with an emblem wh-ch he shall wear on his 
shirt or sweater. This rule will be enforced strictly in 
1968-69 as it has been in recent years. The emblem is 
to be worn on the left shoulder shirt sleeve approxi- 
mately one and one-half inches below the shoulder 
seam. The Approved or Certified bar should be worn 
below the emblem. Failure to wear the emblem will 
make an official liable for suspension from the Officials' 
Division of the Association. 

Recommended uniforms are as follows: 

Football — black and white striped shirt (long or 
short sleeves), black bareball cap with white piping, 
white knee pants, black belt, black stockings, black 
shoes and laces; 

Basketball — black and white striped shirt (short 
sleeves, long sleeves by special permission), black 
trousers, black belt, black shoes and laces; 

Baseball — navy blue or black trousers, black athletic 
leather shoes (not football shoes), navy blue coat or 
jacket, navy blue shirt if working coatless, white shirt 
if wearing coat or jacket, white shirt on bases if all base 
upmires are dressed the same, umpire's navy cap (no 
player caps), indicator and mask of choice, inner pro- 
tector or inflated protector (inflated type if official 
desires to purchase), black belt, black shoe laces, jlack 
tie with white shirt. 



School for Basketball Officials 

The Twentieth Annual School for Basketball Officials 
was held at the Ramada Inn, Lexington, on August 4-5, 
1968. Basketball Clinic Director Charlie 'Vettiner direct- 
ed the school. 

The services of the area representatives who attend- 
ed the school will be available to Association member 
schools throughout the basketball season. The men will 
conduct additional clinics for officials, coaches, and 
players; and assist beginning officials in registration. 

K.H.S.A.A. area representatives who attended the 
school were: Rex Alexander, Murray; Charhe Irwin, 
Hopkins ville; Jerry Kimmel, Beechmont; Howard 
Gardner, Elizabethtown; Claude Ricketts, Louisville; 
Hubert Louden, Louisville; Roy "Winchester, Bethlehem; 
Bob Miller. Fort Thomas; Howard Rogers, Winchester; 
Billy Wise, Lexington; Bob Foster, Science Hill; Billy 
Joe Golden, Lynch; Goebel Ritter, Whitesburg; E. B. 
May, Jr., Prestonsburg; Ernie Chattin, Ashland. 




Garrett Beshear 

Garrett Beshear, coach at Murray University School 
and one of Murray State University's all-time great 
basketball players, died of a heart attack July 24, at 
Michigan State University. 

Beshear, 46, was at Michigan State to attend a 
Driver Trairiing and Safety Institute. He had coached 
basketball and baseball at University School since 1954. 

Beshear enjoyed a storybook career at Murray 
State Where he enrolled as a 27-year-old World War II 
Army veteran in 1949. Known as "Daddy," he won All- 
Ohio Valley Conference Jionors three consecutive years 
and was a member of Murray State's first OVC cham- 
pionship team in 1952. 

Second higheit scorer in Murray State history with 
1659 points during his career, Beshear still holds the 
record for the highest per game average during a single 
season — 23.8 during 1953, when he was 30 years old. His 
single game scoring record of 41 was broken only 
recently. 

In addition to coaching duties at the University 
ScJiool, Beshear taught driver safety and physical edu- 
cation. During the summer he taught swimming classes 
for elementary and pre-school children. 

A native of Dawson Springs in Hopkins County, 
Beshear was scheduled to begin a program in driver 
education and safety at the university this fall. How- 
ever, he planned to continue coaching. He was attend- 
ing the driver education session at Michigan State lor 
the third summer. 

Beshear earned the B. S. degree in 1953 and the 
M. A. degree in 1958 at Murray State. He had also done 
graduate work at Indiana University. 

Besides being known for his basketball playing and 
coaching, Beshear was an avid outdoorsman and was 
widely acclaimed one of the best bass fishermen and 
quail hunters in western Kentucky. 

Beshear is survived by his wife, Lucy; two sons, 
Gary, a heutenant in the Army, and Keeny, a student 
at Murray High S(jhool; and his mother, Mrs. Ethel 
Beshear of Dawson Springs. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 196S 



Page Three 



Officials' Ratings on Sportsmanship of K.H.S.A.A. 
Member Schools in Basketball 1967-1968 

(Continued from August ATHLETE) 



SCHOOL 

Livingston Central 

Lloyd 

London 

Lone Jack 

Lone Oak 

Louisa 

Louisville Country Day 

Louisville Male 

Lowes 

Ludlow 

Lynch 

Lynn Camp 

Lyon County 

McCreary County 

McDowell 

McKell 

McKinney 

Madison 

Madison Central 

Madison ville 

Martin 

Mason County 

Mayfield 

Maysville 

Maytown 

M. C. Napier 

Meade County 

Meade Memorial 

Memorial 

Menifee County 

Mercer County 

Metcalfe County 

Middlesboro 

Millard 

Millersburg Military Institute 

Model 

Montgomery County 

Monticello 

Morgan County 

Mt. Sterling 

Mt. Vernon 

Mt. Washington 

Muhlenberg Central 

Muliins 

Munfoid ville 

Murray 

Murray University 

Nancy 

Newport 

Newport Catholic 

Nicholas County 

North Hardin 

North Marshall 

North Warren 

Oakdale Christian 

Ohio County 

Oil Springs 

Old Kentucky Home 

Oldham County _ 

Olive Hill !___ 

Oimstead 

One'da Inst. 

Owen County 

Owensboro 

Owpnsboi-o Catholic 

Ows'ev County 

Padiirah Tilghman 

Paintsville 

Paris 

Park City '~_ ~ 

Paul G. Blazer I." 

Pendleton County 

Phelps 

Pikeville 1_ ~~ 

pine Knot I.III. 

Pineville 

PJeasure Ridge Park _-____" 

Portland Christian 

Powell County 

Prestonsburg 



E 


G 


27 


19 


38 


29 


57 


8 


48 


6 


43 


11 


37 


5 


30 


13 


42 


19 


26 


24 


19 


28 


23 


9 


41 


18 


19 


16 


41 


13 


49 


11 


28 


18 


40 


13 


33 


11 


44 


16 


16 


26 


66 


11 


61 


17 


39 


12 


31 


20 


38 


11 


25 


9 


36 


8 


56 


3 


50 


10 


45 


12 


19 


16 


31 


14 


40 


13 


52 


6 


45 


12 


24 


11 


38 


18 


60 


6 


53 


9 


27 


18 


43 


12 


50 


17 


49 


20 


64 


9 


49 


9 


28 


9 


22 


6 


69 


11 


41 


23 


48 


18 


64 


6 


35 


10 


42 


12 


29 


13 


22 


2 


28 


21 


43 


3 


31 


14 


47 


14 


70 


8 


24 


15 


45 


6 


30 


13 


55 


10 


42 


21 


40 


13 


39 


7 


33 


10 


56 


6 


4?. 


6 


46 


11 


65 


6 


57 





48 


2 


57 


20 


36 


10 


33 


2! 


12 


9 


48 


10 


31 


7 



COACH 
F 

6 
4 
1 
2 
5 

2 
1 
2 
13 
5 
4 
6 
4 

5 
6 
1 
3 
4 



5 
1 
9 
1 

1 

2 
3 
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4 


7 
1 


3 

9 
4 
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5 

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2 
2 
1 
3 
2 
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I 
3 1 
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P I 

3 

2 

1 

1 


8 
2 

6 
2 



OTHER SCHOOL 

OFFICIALS 
E G F 



38 
50 
63 
50 
48 
37 
35 
46 
36 
46 
34 
48 
33 
48 
50 
32 
47 
40 
50 
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47 
63 
34 
43 
39 
31 
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56 
52 
52 
36 
35 
50 
53 
60 
33 
44 
59 
53 
34 
51 
51 
47 
G7 
52 
27 
23 
64 
59 
53 
66 
32 
49 
38 
23 
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45 
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58 
74 
29 
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50 
51 
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42 
53 
42 
52 
67 
56 
49 
62 
45 
38 
12 
67 
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46 
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36 
29 
45 
26 
23 
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42 
26 
45 
46 
25 
43 
35 
41 
18 
45 
48 
31 
26 
31 
19 
37 
50 



CEOWD 
G F 



P I E 



TEAM 
G F 



?4 


3 


3 


32 


20 


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28 


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41 


24 


b 


10 


1 





60 


7 


1 


10 








46 


2 


6 


17 


3 





40 


16 


4 


6 








33 


8 


1 


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3 





27 


15 


2 


16 


1 





47 


14 


1 


24 


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30 


16 


4 


36 


7 


2 


17 


31 


17 


9 


1 


1 


27 


11 





17 


2 


2 


32 


26 


3 


16 


8 


7 


27 


23 


8 


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3 


1 


46 


12 


1 


9 


5 


2 


53 


8 


U 


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23 


23 


4 


13 


3 


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16 


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34 


11 





?0 


3 


2 


41 


22 


3 


27 


7 


1 


20 


26 


4 


19 


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63 


1 


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30 








57 


21 





20 








34 


17 






45 


16 


49 


8 


27 


11 


32 


15 


31 


12 


48 


11 


46 


10 


26 


7 


35 


22 


59 


7 


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13 


28 


19 


31 


22 


47 


18 


32 


26 


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22 


47 


8 


24 


12 


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10 


65 


12 


40 


29 


44 


21 


58 


14 


31 


11 


34 


18 


30 


15 


21 





29 


21 


42 


4 


32 


13 


48 


2U 


64 


12 


22 


17 


43 


13 


28 


18 


41 


24 


43 


19 


47 


10 


31 


14 


39 


8 


51 


11 


39 


9 


48 


8 


55 


17 


47 


10 


38 


12 


62 


11 


30 


17 


32 


22 


11 


9 


55 


7 


31 


4 



5 
4 
6 

1 



1 

3 
10 

1 

3 

5 

4 





1 

2 

2 
14 

2 

2 

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4 

4 

4 

1 

2 

3 

3 

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3 

2 



1 

3 

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1 

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2 I 

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4 I 

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28 
14 
17 

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6 
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16 
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10 1 
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27 I 
7 I 

11 1 
20 I 
26 1 
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29 I 

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11 1 

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17 
27 
22 
10 
13 
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16 
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33 


14 


50 


6 


61 


10 


48 


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35 


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3 

1 


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2 
4 
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1 


2 

> 
1 





Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 196S 



Prichard 

Providence 

Pulaski County 

Raceland 

Red Bird 

Reidland 

Richardsville 

Riverside Christian 

Rowan County 

Russell 

Russell County 

Russell ville 

Sacramento 

St. Agatha 

St. Augustine 

St. Camillus 

St. Catherine 

St. Charles 

St. Francis 

St. Henry 

St. Joseph Prep. 

St. Mary 

St. Patrick 

St. Thomas 

St. Romuald's 

St. Xavier 

Salyersville 

Sandy Hook 

Say re 

Scott County 

Scotts ville 

Sedalia 

Seneca 

Shawnee 

Shelby County 

Shelby ville 

Shepherdsville 

Shopville 

Silver Grove 

Simon Kenton 

Somerset 

South Hopkins 

South Marshall 

Southern 

Stanford 

Symsonia 

Tates Creek 

Taylor County 

Taylors ville 

Temple Hill 

Thomas Jefferson 

Todd County Central __. 

Tollesboro 

Tompkins ville 

Trigg' County 

Trimble County 

Trinity (Louisville) 

Trinity (Whitesville) __. 

Union County 

University 

University Breckinridge 

Valley 

Van Lear 

Virgie 

Waggener 

Walton-Verona 



Warfield 

War^-en County 

Washington County _. 

Way land 

Wayne County 

Webster County 

West Hardin 

West Hopkins 

Western ( Louisville) 

Western (Sinai) 

Westport 

Wheelwright 

Whitesburg 

Whitley County 

Will'Tmsburg 

Williamstown 

Will'sburg 

Wingo 

Wolfe County 

Woodford County 

Wurtland 



57 


15 


2 


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THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE !■ OR SEPTEMBER, 1968 



Page Five 



The Flying Dutchman 

An Open Letter to 

Mr. Ted Sanford, Commissioner 

Kentucky High Sciiool Athletic Association 

Lexington, Kentuclty 

Dear Ted: 

Legend has it that many years ago The Flying 
Dutchman set sail on an endless voyage and that 
even now this phantom ship ploughs the waters of the 
seven seas. Kentucky's Flying Dutchman set sail in 
October of 1942 from your Henderson Port of Com- 
missioner and will complete the second voyage of a 
Flying Dutchman at his home port of Lousiville 
twenty seven years later, on October 7, 1968, when 
the 1968 basketball clinic program ends. 

Ted, how does one fellow who has been associated' 
with another fellow for what amounts to a lifetime 
for many people teU his friend that the road they 
have traveled together for so long is now forking 
and that their professional association is at an end? 
But this is my task. 

Back in 1946, when I became the pioneering rec- 
reation director of Jefferson County, Kentucky, I 
officiated my last state basketball tournament in 
March in the old Armoi-y in Louisville. I then walked 
to the box of my recreation board chaimian, Max 
Sanders, and made him a present of my sweaty 
basketball official's shirt. There were two reasons for 
this, the first being that I was officiating my last 
game and wouldn't need the shirt anymore; and the 
second that my one hundred per cent effort from 
this point forward would go toward developing an 
outstanding recreation program for Jefferson County. 

Because of my great love for basketball, Dick 
Van Hoose, who was a charter member of the first 
Jefferson County Recreation Board, suggested that 
I should remain as your Dean of Basketball Officials 
and as the Rules Interpreter of Kentucky. This af- 
forded me the opportunity to train Kentucky's officials 
and to strive for uniformity of officiating. Some uni- 
formity has been achieved. 

Maybe it's hard for you, Ted, and other Ken- 
tuckians to realize this but although I am a profes- 
sional park and recreation man, I have had so little 
time to spend on recreation for myself that my fun 
and my greatest enjoyment has been those annual 
clinics, schools for basketball officials and the friend- 
ships of the cavalcade of board of control members 
over the years. As nostalgia creeps into my letter, 
I thank God for the hundred's of friends the basket- 
ball clinics have spawned for me over our state and 
say a prayer for those friends of the Dutchman who 
made their lives count for kids and have moved on 
into eternity. You know. Ted. of all the fellows whom 
I remember being actively engaged in basketball 
when The Flying Dutchman set sail in 1942, you and 
Ashland's dearly-loved and highly-respected Ernie 
Ohattin will be the only remaining as I check out. 

After twenty-seven years in the work of training 
Kentucky's basketball officials, it's Uke "cutting a 
chunk" out of a guy when he has to end such an 
era. When I told you in Lexington, back in August, 
that I was going to write this letter, I had a lump 
in my throat all the way back to Louisville. I know 
that you and my friends from the mountains through 
the Bluegrass to the Penny rile will ask, "Why is 
The Dutchman giving up this thing that he loves?"— 
and you have a right to know. 

Back in 1942, when I was iteaohing at Fairdale 
High School, and from 1946 through 1967, while I was 
Director of Recreation and Parks for Jefferson 



County, Kentucky, I had some spare time which 
became less and less as my Jefferson County's Pro- 
gram of Parks and Recreation grew to be one of the 
country's largest and one of the nation's big four in 
1967. An exciting change took place on December 
1, 1967, when Mayor Kenneth Schmied of Louisville 
and Judge Marlow W. Cook of Jefferson County 
asked me to head the merged park and recreation 
systems of Louisville and Jefferson County. Writing 
the plan of merger and implementing it required 
seven days each week, leaving only a few waking 
hours for me to give to the prepa"ation of my clinic 
work. 

Ted, I still thought that, even though I was now 
doing two park and recreation jobs, that I could still 
hang on ( and I did want to) to my association with 
the K.H.S.A.A. Then came the announcement that 
Louisville's multi-million dollar Zoological Gardens, 
as well as the Belle of Louisville, would also come 
under my direct supervision — this did it, Ted. Ap- 
parentiy the Mci'i Upstairs is saying, "Charlie, your 
whistle is needed more in the ghettos of Louisville 
than in the basketball clinics of Kentucky; you've 
also got to get 5.000 additional acres of park ground 
for metropolitan Louisville and Jefferson County be- 
fore I blow the whistle on you." — So it is that The 
Dutchman closes one more door, opens another and 
wonders how many more doors there are. 

It's hard for me to tell you. Ted, how much your 
friendship and the opportunities you have given me 
have influenced my life. It was throuerh my connection 
with you and the K.H.S.A.A. that I was privileged 
to become a close friend and to be associated with 
that "Giant o* i Man," Cliff Fagan. Then there was 
the great John Bunn. Milt Spmnger. Herman Keller, 
Phil Eskew, Harold Meyer. Paul Landis, Dave Arnold. 
George Ireland. H. V. .Porter. L. V. PhiUips, Bob 
Hinshaw. Bud Foster, and countless others from coast 
to coast. Again, it was with your recommendation that 
I was named a member of the National Basketball 
Rules Committee of the United States and Canada. 
Thanks, Ted! 

There's another chap I must pay tribute to as I 
finish my era of training basketball officials for the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association— that's Earl 
Ruby, of The Louisville Courier-Journal. When I did 
that first clinic for you in 1942, gasoline was being 
rationed because of the war and when I lift Louisville 
for my 1900 mile trip over the state. I had coupons 
eood for only twelve gallons of gasoline. Earl pub- 
licized in his "Ruby's Report" that I was carrying 
a tow rope and for all good citizens to give me a 
tow. I was towed halfway over the Commonwealth 
that year. If Earl will check his reoorts for either 
October or November of 1942, he will find his story 
of a big moving van hauling me and my car from 
Cincinnati to Aberdeen, Ohio. At Aberdeen, Coach 
Earle Jones and a crew of his ball players pushed 
me across the bridge to the Maysville Clinic. In- 
cidentally, Ted, without Earl Ruby's constant help I 
doubt that I would ever have gotten my parks and 
recreation program "off the ground" back in 1946, 
as well as my first miles clinic in 1942. 

Yes, Ted, there are lots of fond memories and 
all of them come rushing back to me as the twenty 
seven year voyage of Kentuck-y's Flying Dutchnian 
ends. You know that I am a sentimental fellow and 
believe me when I say that this last clinic trip over 
Kentucky has got to be my "Sentimental Journey." ' 
Sincerely your friend, 
Charlie Vettiner 
Kentucky's Flying Dutchman 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1968 



Football Examination 

Part II of the National Federation Football Exami- 
nation for officials will be given in Kentucky on Monday, 
Seplember 16. An official who has been registered for 
at least one year prior to the current season is eli^ble 
to take the examination and work for a higher rating. 
Officials who hold the Approved rating in football are 
required to make a minimum percentage grade of 80 
in order to maintain this rating from year to year. After 
an official has received the Certified rating, he con- 
tinues to receive this rating each year provided that he 
attends the clinic for that year and has worked in at 
least six first team high sdhool football games during 
the previous year. Eligible officials who wish to take 
the lest should write to the State Office at once. 



to be appointed by him, would be announced later. 

Don R. Rawlings moved, seconded by Morton Combs, 
that all bills of the Association for the period beginning 
June 1, 1968, and ending July 31, 1968, be allowed. The 
motion was carried unanimously. 

There being no further business, the meeting ad- 
journed. 



Minutes of Board Meeting 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky High School 
Athle;ic Association met at Ken-Bar Hotel, Kentucky 
Dam Village, on Saturday morning, August 10, 1968. 
The meeting was called to order by retiring President 
Eton R. Rawlings at 9:30. Present were Board members 
Alvin Almond, Morton Combs, Don Davis, Ralph C. 
Dorsey, James T. Dotson, Preston Holland, and Foster 
J. Sanders; Commissioner Theo. A. Sanford, Assistant 
Commissioner J. B. Mansfield, and former Board mem- 
ber Oran C. Teater. The invocation was given by Foster 
J. Sanders. 

Don Davis moved, seconded by Ralph C. Dorsey, 
that the reading of the minutes of the June 7'h meeting 
be waived, since the members of the Board had received 
copies of these minutes. The motion was carried 
unanimously. 

New Board member James T. Dotson was welcomed 
to the Board by Mr. Rawlings, who also complimented 
Mr. Teater on the contribution which he had made to 
the Association during his edght-year tenure as a mem- 
ber of the Board of Control. 

President Rawlings stated that the next order of 
business was the election of President and Vice-Presi- 
dent of the Board. Foster J. Sanders moved, seconded 
by Morton Combs, that Preston Holland and Ralph C. 
Dorsey be elected President and Vice-President of the 
Board of Control respectively by acclamation. The 
motion was carried, with Messrs. Holland and Dorsey 
not voting. 

Mr. Rawlings, in turning the chair over to Mr. Hol- 
land, stated that he had especially enjoyed the 1967-68 
year as Board President, and that he appreciated the 
cooperation which had been given him by the other 
members of the Board. 

President Holland thanked the naembers of the Board 
for electing him to the presidency, also complimenting 
Mr. Teater for the service which he 'had rendered the 
Association. An appropriate response was made by Mr. 
Teater. Mr. Dorsey tlhanked the Board for electing him 
to the vice-presidency. 

The Commissioner made a report to the Board on 
Association receipts and disbursements during the year 
1967-68. Copies of the audit, recently prepared by Huet 
L. Johnson of Louisville, Certified F*ubUc Accountant, 
had been mailed to the members of the Board. James 
T. Do'son moved, seconded by Alvin Almond, that the 
financial report presented by the Commissioner be ac- 
cepted. The motion was carried unanimously. 

It was the decision of the Board members that the 
fall meeting of the Board be held in Lexington on Octo- 
ber 12. 

President Holland stated that the 1968-69 committees, 



Schools' Ratings on 
Basketball Officials 

The following ratings were received on basketball officials 
registered with the K.H.S.A.A. during 1967-68. The numbers 
following each name respectively represents the number of 
Excellent, Good, Fair, and Poor ratings given to the officia'. 

Abney, Bob, 1-4-3-0 : Alexander, Howard S., 4-1-3-1 : Alex- 
ander. Rex E., 11-23-4-U: Allen. James D., 4-0-2-1; Allen, J. 
Mack. 0-3-0-1 : Allen, Nelson Robert. 19-9-1-1 : Allen, Willard, 
4-4-2-0: Allgood. Russell L., 0-2-2-0; Anders, Raleigh A., 1-11- 
4-0; Anderson, Luther S., 0-3-0-1; Arbuckle. Kenneth E., 3- 
13-5-1 ; Archibald. Larry, 0-1-1-0 ; 

Back, Phillip A., 2-0-1-0 ; Baker. Billy B., 0-6-2-1 : Baker, 
Robert. 1-9-0-0; Ballaban, Thomas. 10-4-1-0; Bankemper. 
Thomas, 1-3-2-0; Barker, Walter D.. 2-4-1-1; Barnette. Jerl-y. 
0-1-0-1 ; Bates. Bob, 1-1-1-0 ; Bates, Gardner, Jr.. 0-4-0-1 : 
Beam. Joseph P., Jr., 1-0-1-0; Beck, Richard E., 0-1-0-0; Beil, 
Clarence T.. 5-7-0-0 ; Bennett. Gene, 1-2-0-1 ; Benzinger. Jos3p:t, 
6-10-2-0 ; Berry. William, 1-2-2-0 ; Bienick. Stanley, 0-2-0-0 ; 
Bigelow, James E., 0-0-2-2 ; Bishop. Heulyn, 5-4-2-0 ; Black- 
wood. Thomas W.. 15-20-1-1 ; Blair, Ivan, 0-2-9-0 ; Blankenship, 
Zeb, 2-3-3-0 ; Blevins. Boone, 15-9-1-0 ; Bock, David. 0-0-0-1 ; 
Boyd. Eddie W., 0-0-2-3 ; Boyles. Paul E.. 2-7-2-2 ; B-adfor 1. 
Robert L., 1-0-1-0; Bradley. Delano R., 0-1-0-0; Brannon. W. 
Russell. 0-6-4-0 ; Brant, Bernard. 0-2-0-0 ; Brashear. Loy Ray. 
29-3(;-10-l ; Brashears. Malcolm W.. 0-1-0-0 ; Branch, Charles 
J.. 2-0-0-0; Brizendine. Vic. 13-12-7-2; Brock, Alben, 10-19-0-1; 
Brock, John D.. 10-18-0-2; Brock. John H.. 5-8-0-0; Brock. 
Lavone E., 1-0-1-0 ; Brown. Billy C. 3-:^-l-l ; Brown, E. C. 
13-19-6-0; Brown, John "Scoop". 10-15-1-1; Browning. Earl 
E.. 13-11-2-2; Bruner. Jack C 25-24-2-2; Bryan, Phil. 0-5-0-0; 
Buckman, Andrew M.. 0-0-0-1 ; Buis. Nathaniel. 9-13-5-2 ; 
Bunnell. Rouseau, 4-5-1-2 ; Burch, Bill, 6-5-1-0 ; Burchett. 
Lanier S., 2-2-0-0 ; Burke, Harry R.. 22-25-1-0 ; Burkhart, 
James G.. 2-11-0-0; Burnett. Gerald "Duke". 12-13-3-3; Burnett, 
W. L., 5-1-1-0; Burrows, Walter H.. 0-3-2-2: Butcher. Douglas, 
22-26-7-9 ; Butcher. Granville "Bo". 23-29-5-3 : Butler, Bob. 
4-33-5-2 Butner, Billy M.. 6-33-4-2 ; Byron. Lou, 1-1-0-0 ; 

Caldwell. James A., 17-17-0-1 ; Calitri. Donald Lynn. 0-4-0-1 ; 
Callahan. Thomas J.. 0-7-1-0 : Callighan. Robert, 0-9-3-1 ; 
Campbell, George. 0-1-0-0 ; Campbell, John. 6-7-8-0 : Canady. 
Ray Blair. 4-16-2-1; Cantrell, Hubert, 1-4-0-0; Cantrell, Joseph 
D.. 1-0-0-0: Caple, Harold E., 6-15-4-0: Carlberg, John H.. 
17-12-4-2 ; Carlberg. Ralph C, 1-0-0-0 ; Carr, Billy W.. 1-0- 
0-0; Carr. Gene P.. 0-2-0-1; Cash. Charles C, 0-3-0-0: Cash, 
Randall E.. 0-1-0-0 ; Castle, Jack. 2-0-1-0 : Gates Billy Chester, 
0-0-0-2; Cecil Donnie, 1-1-2-0; Chambers, William V-rt-il, 
0-^-0-2 : Chandler. Melvin. .S-16-3-1 ; Chaney, Leroy M.. 0-2-0-0 : 
Ciianey. Rex. 2-0-0-1 ; Childers. Charles L.. 0-5-3-1 ; Chitwood, 
Henry, 0-0-1-0 : Cisco, Robert N.. 1-3-0-0 : Clardy. Barry D., 
2-4-2-2 : Clary. Kenneth. 0-0-1-0 ; Cla'k, Larry W.. 3-1-4-0 ; 
Clark, Owen B.. 3-1-0-0 ; Clark, Robert L.. 0-3-0-0 : Clark, Tom. 
4-7-0-0 : Cleavenger. Ed 1-2-2-1 ; Clemmons Sam P.. 4-7-2-0 ; 
Clevenger. Charles Ed. 0-7-1-0 ; Clevenger. Mike. 0-1-0-0 ; Cline, 
Allen D.. 2-4-3-0 : Cobb. Mike. 1-4-7-1 ; Cochran, Roy H.. 
in-3-4-0; Coffev. Marion L., 0-4-0-0; Coffey. Robert A., 0-2-0-0; 
Coffman. C. Morris, 0-1-0-0; Coleman. Daniel L, 0-2-0-0; 
Coleman, James Ed, 0-2-0-1: Colley. Lynn W.. 1-6-5 0: Collier, 
Burnard. 3-17-0-0 : Collins, Hubert, 8-21-5-5 ; Collins, Jack. 
1-0-0-0: Colvin, Jack E.. 0-1-1-0: Combs Keith. 11-13-3-0: 
Combs, Eugene W.. 0-15-0-0: Conley, Connie B.. 2-3-0-0; Conley, 
Lindsey. 0-1-0-0 : Conley, Ted. 10-12-3-3 : Cooksey, Marvin, 
2-15-0-3: Cooper. Warren. 15-5-0-0; Copley. Sidney M.. U-S- 
3-1 : Cornelison, Walter L.. 2-10-3-0 ; Cornwell J<im<.s, 0-''-3-2 : 
Cox, Alva John. 3-7-1-0 ; Cox, Colin Kelly, 4-2-3-1 : Cox R'lf us 
A.. 1-8-7-2 ; Coy. Charlie S.. 1-2-0-0 ; Crager. Bobby F.. 10-10-1- 
2: Cravens. Richard F.. 0-3-0-2; Cravens Robert. 6-17-1-3; 
Crawford, Donald Ray. 0-1-2-0: Crawford W, Cordon, 0-1-0 0: 
Creech. Robert Lee. 0-1-0-0 : Crisp. Donald E.. 0-3-2-1 : Croft. 
Lewis E.. 1-15-5-2 : Crook, Bill. 0-0-2-0 : Crump, Dav'd. 0-0-0-1 ; 
Cullum. Harold. 3-0-0-0 ; Culp, Ronald D.. 4-4-0-5 : Cu!n. Willard. 
2-11-2-3: Cummins. Ray E.. 1-2-0-0; Cunningham, Jul'an R.. 
1-10-3-2; Cunningham. Ronald M.. 0-2-1-1: Curb's Douglas E., 
0-1-0-0 : 

Dame, L. J., 6-17-2-0 ; Daniel, Roger T.. 7-.')-0-0 : Daniels. 
Bob. 5-3-0-0 : Dann. Nick, 2-12-2-2 ; Daum. Charles A.. 1-2-0-0 ; 
Daveinort, B'-w-T>n 11-5-2-0: Davis A. J- 0-1-1-0; D'ivis, 
Ha-o'd T., 5-15-3-1: Dav^s. Ralph C. 3-1-0-1; Dav's Rilnh E.. 
24-5-5-1 : Davis, William T.. 1-1-0-0 : Dawson. Rav. 0-1-1-0 ; 
Day. Bill E.. 6-18-3-1; Day, Charles Ray. 2-13-2-3; Day Jickie 
L., 2-6-1-1 : DeGrotte, James, 0-1-0-0 : Denham, Ronald, 2-;!-0-l : 
Dennedy. T. Robert. 0-5-0-1 : Denton. Charles. 0-0-2-0 ; DeVary, 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1968 



Page Seven 



Bill, 11-17-0-1: Dieterle, Owen. M., 2-5-1-1: Dills, Bernie, 0-1- 
0-1 ; Disken, Jim, 1-3-1-0 ; Divine, Wayne L.. 5-4-2-1 : Dixon, 
Billy M., 1-4-0-1 ; Dobson, Kenneth, 1-2-0-1 : Dockery, Donald, 
:i.6-3-0 : Donoho, Edward Hunt, 0-3-0-0 ; Dorsey, James, 8-12- 
1-2 : Downs. Joseph W., 5-3-1-1 : Drake. Richard R., 12-27-1-0 : 
Driskell, Earl, Jr.. 15-10-4-7: Driver. Bobby. 0-3-1-1: Duerson, 
William R.. 8-20-6-1: Duff, Birchell, 2-0-0-0: Duff, Earl, '.1-18- 
3-1 : Duff. William. C, 0-2-0-0 : Dunagan, Leon, 0-4-0-0 : Duncil, 
Charles W., 2-5-2-0 : Durbin, Hade, Jr., 17-24-7-0 ; Durbin, Roy. 
3-11-1-1 : Durden, John R.. 0-0-2-0 : Duvall. Thomas Jay, 13-30- 
4-1 ; Dyke, Orville Dean, 2-0-0-1 : 

Eades, James M.. 7-19-5-4: Edwards. Don A.. 0-1-0-0: 
Edwards. Hugh R.. 5-4-1-1: Ellington, James E., 3-11-0-0: 
Elliott. Carroll L.. 18-10-8-3: Ellis. Johnny. 1-4-0-1: Elmore. 
Jimmy A.. 29-16-1-1 : Emery, George A., 0-2-0-1 : Evans. Gary 
S., 0-0-3-0 : Parish. Merlin J.. 0-0-1-0 : Farley, Jimmy 0-7-6-3 : 
Farmer, Billie L., 0-3-1-0 : Farmer, Jack. 13-14-3-2 : Feix. Al. 
II. 0-5-1-0 : Ferguson. Thomas L.. 1-0-1-0 ; Fields. Rufus. Jr.. 
0-0-0-1: Finley. Albert, 13-22-6-0: Fish. Leland C... 3-10-1-0: 
Flowers. Randall B., 0-5-3-0 : Flynn, Bobby, 27-5-3-1 : Ford, 
Eddie L.. 0-2-0-0 : Foster, Berryman E., 1-0-0-0 : Foster, Bob, 
.39-11-2-0 : Foster. J. W.. 0-1-0-1 : Fowler. Ronald S.. 0-0-2-0 : 
Fox. David. 0-1-0-0 : Fraley. Bill. 2-17-7-2 : Frankel, Louis S.. 
0-1-0-0: Freese. Oliver. 0-6-1-0: Freppon. Tom. 1-11-0-1: Frey. 
William R.. 0-1-0-0 : Fritz. Robert C... 0-1-0-0 : Fritz. Sherman. 
23-22-3-0 : Fulkerson. James R.. 0-2-0-0 : Fuller. John R.. 
0-6-7-2 : 

Gabbard. Donald L.. 0-8-0-0 : Gabbard. John B.. 0-5-2-0 ; 
Gaines, Harvey, 2-il-O-l : Gaither, Gene, 9-28-4-3 : Gallagher, 
Ronald M.. 0-0-1-0 : Gardner. Gary. 3-0-1-0 : Gardner. Woodford. 
0-1-0-0 : Garland. Danny. 0-1-0-0 : Gentry. Bobby G.. 0-2-1-0 : 
Gentry. Dale J.. 5-2:!-5-4 : Gettler. John F.. 7-14-1-2 : Glbbs. 
C. Richard. 0-0-1-1 : Gibson. Carl. 1-8-0-0 : Gibson. Fred W.. 
.3-3-1-0 : Gilbert. Gerald L.. 35-32-7-0 : Gilbert. Lawrence "Butch". 
3-7-2-0 : Gill, Joe, 0-6-3-0 : Oilman, Ronald, 2-0-0-0 : Giordano, 
Al, 0-1-4-2 : Glasscock. William. 0-3-4-5 : Goff. Reathel, 6-15- 
7-0: Coins, Edgar S.. 2-4-2-0: Golden. Billy Joe. 53-32-2-2: 
Goley. Jim. 5-30-2-0 : Goodin. Shirley G.. 0-0-1-0 : Goodlett. 
Clifton H.. 0-1-1-0: Goodman. Jack. 42-15-2-3: Goodman, Jimmy 
R., 0-3-0-0 : Gordon, Levi, 0-1-0-0 : Gordon, Ronald F.. 0-1-0-0 : 
Gour. Bob. 25-35-10-4 : Cover. Luid J.. 3-12-4-1 : Grace. H. E., 
Jr., 0-0-2-0 : Graham, James, 3-9-4-2 : Grav, Raymond, 4-6-3-0 : 
Green, Walt, 17-19-0-1 : Gregory, Terry M.. 2-0-0-0 : Grigsby. 
Pete, Jr.. 15-12-0-0 : Grooms, Roger C. 0-1-0-1 : Gustafson, Al. 
.'Gus." 10-17-2-0: 

Hagan. Joe. 4-3-4-1 : Hagen. William Randy. 2-2-1-0 : Hall. 
Charles. 0-3-3-0 : Hall. Jack R.. 3-6-0-1 : Hall. Mac. 1-3-1-0 : 
Hall. Tommy D.. 0-1-1-0 : Hall. William C. 0-0-2-2 : Hall. 
William W.. 1-2-1-0 : Ham. Ronald. 0-4-1-0 : Hamilton. Walter 
P., 0-1-1-0 : Hamm, Gerald, 5-22-7-2 : Hamm. Harold D.. 0-7-0-1 : 
Hammock. Don L.. 4-13-5-2: Hammons, Norman, 13-42-5-2: 
Hancock, N. E.. 0-9-0-0: Haney. Raymond. 1-1-0-0: Hardin. 
Carl Ray. 1-8-3-0: Hardin. Don G.. 15-27-2-3: Hardin. Jack. 
2-0-0-0: Hargis. Noel Keith. 2-5-1-0: Harned. Vic. 40-25-1-0: 
Harp. Kenneth. 0-6-0-0 : Hai-per. Randall H.. 8-6-0-1 : Harper. Ro- 
bie. 43-22-2-0 : Harris. Billy. 10-32-6-2 : Harris. Wayne. 3-9-3-3 : 
Harrison, John L.. 14-29-3-1 : Hartman. Robert E., 0-0-0-1 : 
Hatfield. Cecil E.. 5-7-1-0 : Hawkins. Will A.. 1-1-0-0 : Hayden. 
Samuel J.. 3-19-7-2 : Kaynes. William T.. 3-9-2-0 : Hazelwood. 
Howard. 0-1-4-1 : Heath. T. Robert. 4-1-0-0 ; Hein^chen. Carl 
C. 0-0-0-1 : Heldman. John. 1-0-0-0 : Hendrix. Jack. 5-0-1-0 : 
Henson. Tony C 0-7-1-0: Hewitt. R. T.. 18-22-1-0: Hicks. 
Harold. O-I-O-O: Hicks. Lloyd. 0-1-0-0: Higgins, Hobby D.. 
0-3-0-0 : Hill. Earl E.. 13-17-5-0 : Hina Roy D.. 0-7-0-1 : H-nkle. 
Melvin B.. 2-0-0-0 : Hinton. Henry. 19-27-6-5 : Hitt. Billv D.. 
.5-0-0-0: Hoffmeier. Paul C. 1-0-0-0: Hofsetter- Joe. 12-10-2-1: 
Holbrook. William H.. 1-6-1-0 : Holeman. Bill R.. 0-5-2-1 : Hol- 
lingsworth. Ralph 1-1-0-0 : Holt. Robert E.. 0-24-9-1 : Holt- 
houser. Ora L.. 10-9-1-1 : Holthouser. Terry W.. 0-0-2-0 : Hel- 
ton. Rav. 0-9-0-0 : Hook B.B.. 6-14-7-0 : Hook Don. 1-2-1-1 : 
Horn. Everett, Jr.. 3-i>-0-0 : Horsman. Bill. 6-14-4-3: Howard. 
Bruce L.. 16-11-0-0: Howard Carl. 2-1-1: Howar.l Robert 
E.. 1-7-1-1: Hubbard. David. 1-9-1-0: Hubbs Cletus L.. 12-17- 
4-1 : Hudnall. William E.. 2-0-0-0 : Hughes Paul P . 25-30-3-2 : 
Huiet. Whitey. 5-7-0-1 : Hume. Charles 5-26-6-2 : Hunley, Neil 
P.. 13-18-1-0: Hurley. Robert. 1-3-0-0: Hutchens Jim. 9-16-0-2: 
Hutchinson. .Tack T.. 2-4-0-0 : Huter. James J.. 3-1-1-0 ; Hyland. 
F. D.. 3-1-0-0 : Hyman. Alan David. l-O-O-O : 

Idol, Billv Joe, 6-9-3-0 : Ingrham, Gary J.. 1-0-0-0 : Irwin. 
Charles 19-21-3-1 : 

Jackson. Arthur E.. 0-1-0-0: Jackson. Robert 0-3-0-1: 
.Tackson. Willie Lee. 0-1-0-1: Jacobs. Don-is R., 1-0-0-0: Jenk- 
ins. Beryl, 0-2-1-0: Jent, Richard Lynn. 0-1-0-0: Johnson, 
Harrv B.. 11-15-0-2 : Johnson. .Tack D.. 1-1-0-1 : Johnson. Jam-s 
M.. 27-24-5-1 : Johnson, Jerry I.,ee. 1-0-0-0 : Johnson Jimmv I.. 
1-4-0-0 : Johnson. Ronald L.. 3-6-6-0 ; Johnson Walter. 42-27- 
0-0: .Tohnson. W. Bernard 2-21-5-3: Johnson. Willie Rob, 1-2- 
0-0: Jones. Carson G.. 8-15-6-6: Jones. Denver. 0-4-1-0: Jones. 
Ervin. 0-0-1-0 : Jones. Frank. 0-1-3-0 : Jones Joe S.. 0-0-1-1 : 
.Tones. John Howard. 0-0-1-0 : Jones. Rohert L. 6-3-2-0 : Jones. 
William L., 2-9-0-1 : Jump, Frank E.. 0-5-1-1 : Junker. Edwin 
G., 0-1-0-1 ; 

Kays, Herbert S.. 4-0-0-1: Kazee. Allan J.. 1-2-1-0- Koat- 
lev. James H.. 0-4-0-0 : Keeling Joe 0-4-2-1 : Keel-n-r. R-uhen. 
0-2-0-0 : Kelly. Charles R.. 8-4-0-1 : Kellv. William G . 3-2-0-0 ; 
Ke'sch, James Ron 0-0-1-0: Kemnlin Franklin, 0-1-1: Kid- 
well. James S.. 0-1-3-0: Kimmel. Jerry, 4';-22-in-a: KinT. 
James ^.. 39-16-7-2: King Price Ja->ies 1-fl-n.fl; !.'.■„, R..V- 
mond H.. 1-3-0-0: Kinney. Charles. 0-3-1-0: Kirk. Charles F.. 



5-8-2-1 : Knight. Bill. 9-7-1-2 : Knox, Edward G.. 0-1-0-1 : Kuhl, 
Lawrence. 8-6-0-0 ; 

Ladd, Ronald E.. 0-1-4-0: Lambert. Irvin. 2-5-2-1: Lam- 
bert. Robert. 0-0-2-0 : Landres. John F.. 0-4-0-0 ; Larsen. George. 
2-1-0-0 : Laskey, George O.. 0-0-2-1 : Latkovski. Anastasius. 
2-7-0-1 : Laubheimer. Don T.. 19-22-2-1 : Lawson, Rondall. 
0-2-2-0: Lawson. Rondell. 23-14-2-1: Leber. Jerry L.. 0-0-1-0: 
Lefevers. Colman J.. 0-1-0-0: Lequire. H. M., 5-22-0-0: Lester. 
J. L.. 0-4-1-0: Lile. Clyde F.. 9-17-0-1: Lillie. William Westly. 
0-2-0-1: List. Frank A., 7-15-3-0: Littral, James W.. 2-0-0-0: 
Lloyd, David, 0-0-1-0 : Logue, Ronald Gene. 0-1-0-0 ; Long. Bill. 
5-10-3-1: Long. James E.. 0-1-1-0: Long. Robert F.. 6-3-0-0: 
Lord. James F.. 2-0-0-0 : Louden. Hubert C. 24-28-7-1 : Loudy. 
Kenneth, 12-14-1-1 : Lovely. Johnnie, 2-0-0-1 : Lowe, Gene T.. 
18-31-4-10: Lowe. James D.. 1-3-0-2: Lucas, Gene T., 14-6-1-2: 
Lucas, Jack, 1-4-0-0 : Luebbers, Leonard, 1-4-0-0 ; Lurker. 
Mel. 1-0-0-1; Lusby. George. 11-19-2-0: Lytle. Price. 13-13-3-4; 

McBride. W. Kenneth. 5-3-1-1 : McCargo, Frank. 7-23-6-4 ; 
McCarley, John W.. 0-10-3-0 : McClain. Gerald L.. 1-0-0-0 : 
McClure. William Scott, 14-14-3-0: McCowan, Connell. 1-0-0-0; 
McCoy, Hayse, 12-27-5-2 ; McDonald. Charles W.. 0-4-1-1 : 
McGehee. Gordon. 9-18-7-0: McGlasson. Galen. 0-6-0-0: Mc- 
Guire. Herbert W.. 0-2-2-2 : McKenzie. Robert T.. 6-15-7-1 : 
McKenzie. Robert L.. 0-5-2-0 : McKinney. Adelle F.. 2-4-1-0 : 
McLane. Albert I.. 49-35-7-2: McLean, Gordon. 4-l:i-l-0: Mc- 
Leod. Robert. 5-10-3-1 : McMenama, John H.. 1-1-0-0 ; McNamee. 
Jack E.. 0-3-3-1 : McPike. Ray S.. 0-1-1-3 : 

Madon. Robert L.. 19-19-1-0: Mahan. Carle Earl. 1-0-0-0; 
Maines. George E.. 26-21-6-5 : Marshall. T. N.. 4-6-0-0 : Martin. 
Billy. 0-0-1-0; Martin, Carl T.. 2-11-2-1: Martin. Ralph E.. 
0-2-0-0: Martin. Sam. Jr.. 3-5-2-0: Mason. Gene A.. 0-7-0-0: 
Massie, Stephen. 1-1-1-0 : Mauk. Michael Joe. 0-1-0-0 ; Mauney. 
Bill. 2-1-0-0 : May. E. B.. Jr.. 24-20-2-2 ; Mayes, Edward. 
1-6-3-1 : Mayfield. Clarkie. 9-4-0-1 : Mayfield. John W.. 1-0-0-0 ; 
Maynard. Lonnie, 0-1-0-0 ; Mays, Charles R.. 0-0-0-1 : Meade. 
Foster "Sid". 17-3-5-1 : Meadows. Marvin. 20-40-2-0 : Melear. 
Charles Leland, 7-8-0-1; Melmige, Jim, 2-15-3-0; Menefee, 
Charles F.. 0-1-0-0: Meredith. Denny E.. 19-14-7-2; Meredith. 
Thomas C. 1-1-0-0; Metzger. Donald R.. 12-16-9-2: Mever. 
Harry J.. 0-4-2-0; Middleton, Johnny. 6-16-1-1: Milbern. Dan. 
4-20-6-7 ; Miles. Marvin. 1-13-4-0 : Miles. Robert J.. 2-2-1-0 : 
Miller, Bob. 26-19-2-2 ; Miller. Claude O.. 1-1-1-1 ; Miller. Fer- 
rell. 3-3-0-2 : Miller. Harold P.. 0-1-0-0 : Miller. John. 2-0-0-1 ; 
Miller. Rex J.. 1-6-2-1 : Moberly. Harold. 0-0-2-0 ; Monahan, 
Edward J.. 0-2-0-0; Montgomery. Chester M.. 12-27-1-4: 
Mooneyhan. James H., 3-10-7-5 : Moore, James E.. 3-4-1-0 : 
Moore. James H.. 9-1-1-0: Moore. Robert. 13-27-7-0; Mor<:an. 
Richard. 2-2-5-1 ; Morse. Richard K.. 28-34-4-1 : Moser. Rudy 
Clay. 33-41-1-2 ; Mudd. Ed. 7-6-0-1 ; Mullins. Arthur. 1-2-0-0 ; 
Murohy. Tom, 2-1-0-0 ; Murray, James. 6-17-3-1 : Murrell. Allen 
L.. 13-22-5-1: 

Nash. Dennis B.. 6-C-l-O : Newman, Bill. 9-5-0-1 : Newman. 
Larry. 2-3-2-0 ; Newnam. Lavrv G.. 2-3-1-0 : Newton, John J.. 
0-1-0-0 : Nickell. Charles W.. O-O-I-O ; Noble. Howard W.. 1-2-0-0 ; 
Norwood. Thomas R.. 3-9-5-7 : 

O'Connell. James M.. 2-2-1-0 ; Oiler, Jerry. 2-4-1-1 : Old- 
ham. John H.. 1-1-0-0; Omer. Harold. 2-11--3-1 ; O'Nan. Haro'd 
L.. 0-10-1-1; O'Nan. Norman. 11-30-2-3; Orto'^ Jimmv A.. 
0-1-0-0 ; Osborne. Larry Joe. 2-3-0-0 ; Otis Billy 6-8-3-1 : 
Overton. Frank. Jr.. 0-1-0-0 ; Owens, Bruce E.. 0-9-4-1 ; Pace. 
Donald W.. 6-7-1-0 : Pack, James E.. 0-0-0-1 : Pack James 
W.. 41-30-2-0: Padgett. R. K.. 3-17-4-3: Palko. Edward 1-2-0-0; 
Pardue. Israel. 0-0-1-0; Park. J. M., 2-2-3-0; Parker. Francis 
v.. 0-1-3-0; Par-ish, Dale 0-1-0-0: Pa-ris'- Willi" 2-0-0-2: 
Parrott Lanny L.. 38-17-5-0; Parsons, Fred, 9-9-4-0: Patter- 
son William E.. 0-8-2-2: P.nxton. Garv R. 2-1-0-1; Pavne. 
Gayle. 5-4-3-0; Peay. Curtis, 1-0-0-0: Pe-cher, W. Lloyd. 0-1-0-0; 
Peeno. TTo.-.v R.. 3-3-1-0: Pence. Chorles Eugene, 0-1-1-0; 
Pence. William Jerry 1-15-8-4: Pergvp.n Nard 23-9-0-0; 
Perkins. James P.. 1-3-0-0: Perkins, Roniie L.. 1-2-0-0: P'rrv. 
.Tames E.. 2-10-5-2: Perry Tom 1-4-1-0: Phelns. Rilnh "Rudv", 
8-12-2-2: Phelns. Rav, 3-13-4-0: Pietrowski, Paul 1-8-4-0: 
Points, Charles 1-17-1-3; Ponnas Nickolas 0-1-0-0; Powers, 
Elmer. 0-0-0-1: P-ice. Don. 3-1-0-0- Price Tames K.. 2-17-0-1: 

Radiunas, Edward. 0-3-0-0: Radiunas. Stan 2-3-1-0; P,<iV=l, 
Rob, 4-9-0-1; Ramev, He.-hevt 111-17-2-1- Redm-vn, M»l"in. 
9-12-3-1: Reed. Andrew. 0-1-0-0; Reed, Charles R., 21-8-0-3; 
Reed. Gordon 15-18-3-2: Rees Gayle H., 2-0-0-0: Roinh<.r^t. 
Mvron S, 3';-lil-2-l : Roliford Paul G.. 2-6-3-0: Rosch=- .Tohn. 
.=1-4-3-0; Beu'e, Ronald W.. 0-1-3-0; Rexroat, .Terrv T,., 27-l9-''-2- 
Rhode,, Co-il 0-2-0-1: Rice William L,. 0-3-1-0: Ri'-h. D^-'-'s. 
0-1-n--:>: ».i,.I<Btts Claude O. 17-11-4-7; R'cketts Don-'d R.. 
7-7-3-2: Ricketts. Raymond K. 0-1-0-0: Rio-non. Pih 0-3-1-0: 
Riggs Flovd T.., 1-5-3-1: Rincr B'V 14-92-1-0- Ri,st.r F^o-a- 
L., 18-18-1-1; Ritter, Goebel 34-11-3-0- Roberta Donild n.l.fi.O; 
Roberts Kenneth G-, 0-8-1-1 ; Rohinson. TT^n Tj., 2-S-O-l ; 
Robinson .Tackie 0-2-0-0 • Roe, Dnvie Jr.. 8-7-3-0 - Ro=cV"-s. 
B^vnie 0-1-0-0: Ro*«;el Josenh 2-11-3-2: P^ito^s Wowa-"! T^, 
90-93-2-0: Roller O'is C. 0-9.0-3- Tin^fv Robert D., l-'-O-0: 
Roo" Rennett P.. 2-3-9-0; Rose Wall" 1-8-1-2: Rose, W"i*or 
Scott. 2-8-6-0: Rowe. Steve, 1-0-2-0; Roy. Charles D.. 0-4-1-0; 
Runyon, Tommy Dean, 13-34-0-0 : Rupert, Ray, 0-0-0-1 : Russell. 
Allen. 11-13-0-2; 

Sadler. George A.. 0-1-0-1 : Sagers. Robert M., 0-2-0-0 : St. 
niair. Robert L.. 2.5-12-3-0 : Bailee. Alan L., 0-0-1-0 ; Salyer. 
Henrv E., 1-0-0-0 ; Sammons. Terry L.. 0-1-0-0 : Sams. Glenn. 
0-2-1-1: Sanders. M. L. 4-5-5-0; Sargent. James, 1-1-1-0: 
Saylor, Carlee, 0-3-3-1 : Savior, Lannv Ro.ss, 0-1-0-0 : Scales. 
Meredith E.. 0-1-0-0 : Schad. Jim. 0-5-1-0 : Schleicher, Richard 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1968 



New Baseball Film 

A print oi: tlie new baseball film, KNOW YOUR 
BASEBALL, has been rented by the K.H.S.A.A. from 
Official Sports Film, Inc., and has been placed on loan 
with the Film Library, College of Education, University 
of Kentucky. 

KNOW YOUR BASEBALL is produced under the 
sanction and supendsion of the National Federation of 
State High School Athletic Associations and allied 
groups. This film is the twenty-seventh in the series of 
official rules films and the seventh baseball film. 

Wilson Sporting Goods Co. and Wheaties Sports Fed- 
eration are again serving as co-sponsors of the film as 
they have for all previous films. 

The scenes for KNOW YOUR BASEB.ALL were 
filmed at Terry Park, spring training site for the Pitts- 
burgh Pirates in Ft. Myers, Fla. The new official film is 
made in 16mm sound, with running time of approximate- 
ly 27 minutes. It was produced under the sanction of the 
National Federation of State H. S. Ath. Assoc, and alHed 
groups. The host state for the film was the Florida 
H. S. Activities Assoc. Playing personnel were chosen 
from the Fort Myers Sr. H. S. Members of the National 
Federation of SHAA and allied groups made up tihe 
technical staff; they assure the authenticity of the rules 
for the play situations filmed'. 

KNOW YOUR BASEBALI^What is an appeal, a 
charged conference, a baJk, runner interference? These 
and many other questions are answered in KNOW 
YOUR BASEBALL. Modern photographic techniques, 
such as: stop-action, split-screen, and insitant replay are 
combined with colorful play situations to provide a truly 
outstanding presentation of the rules of baseball. The 
interesting and informative film will add a great deal 
to the understanding and enjoyment of the great Ameri- 
can pastime, baseball. 

L., 0-1-0-0: Schlich. Paul E.. 6-16-0-3: Schlickman, Steve, 
0-2-0-0: Schneider. Phillip T.. 2-1-0-0; Sears, Wilson, 16-9-3-1: 
Seavers, Joe, 3-3-1-0 : Selvy, Curt, 13-8-2-0 ; Sexton. Steven C, 
4-3-4-1 : Sharp, Lloyd, 1-7-1-0 : Shartzer. Phillip E.. 12-21-2-2 ; 
Shaw, Earl, 25-20-7-0 ; Shewmaker, Wayne, 3-2-1-1 : Shields. 
Neil. 0-1-0-0 : Shope. Lowell M., 0-2-0-0 : Showalter, John. 
3-1-2-0; Shuck. Thomas G., 14-20-4-3: Simpson, Fred C 5-14- 
1-0 : Sims, Frank D.. 19-24-2-0 : Sims, Tom M., 5-3-0-0 : Single- 
ton, Bobby. 11-11-5-2: Singleton. Jerry, 1-2-0-0: Sizemore, 
Aster. 1-8-1-0 : Skaggs. Billy C, 0-0-0-1 : Skaggs, L. Robert, 
6-0-1-0 : Skidmore. Richard Lynn. 1-0-0-0 : Slinker, Dennis R., 
0-0-1-1 ; Small, Bill, 6-13-0-3 : Smith, Gary U., 0-1-0-0 : Smith, 
James H., 1-1-1-0: Smith. Richard R., 2-0-0-0: Smith, Roy 
M.. 11-19-7-0 : Smith, Thomas W., 0-2-0-0 ; Smith. Wayne N., 
36-29-9-1 : Smith, Willard N., 37-28-9-1 : Smith, V.'illiam E., 
8-7-2-1 ; Smith, Wyatt Jack, 12-25-12-5 : Smithson. Richard A.. 
32-20-2-5 : Sparks, Keith E., 2-3-0-0 ; Speck, Michael E., 14- 
24-0-2 : Speed. Walter J., 0-1-0-0 : Spencer. Irv., 27-7-4-2 ; 
Spiceland, S. E., 1-8-2-1 : Spoonamore. Jim. 4-24-6-2 : Spradlin. 
Robert, 0-2-1-0 : Stafford, Everett. 0-1-0-0 : Stanko. Edward 
A.. 0-1-0-0 : Starling, Edward, 0-1-0-0 : Steenken. William R.. 
4-8-2-0 : Stephens, Herbert D., 0-2-0-0 : Stephenson, Harry S.. 
11-6-2-2 : Stethen, Jim, 2-9-1-3 : Stewart, Buddy, 1-0-0-0 : Stiff. 
Maurice. 13-21-4-5 : Stikeleather. Clyde L., 38-21-9-4 : Stinson, 
Charles L., 2-0-1-1 : Stoess, Henry L.. 3-14-3-1 : Stovall, Terry, 
0-1-0-0 : Stovall, Tom. 5-5-2-4 : Strain, Richard, 14-32-3-1 : 
Strong. Arnett, 17-23-2-1 : Sucietto, Richard, 1-1-1-0 : Sullivan, 
Dan L., 8-4-1-0: Sullivan, Don Chris, 26-11-0-0: Sumner, Carl 
H., 7-8-5-1: Switzer, David L., 1-2-0-0: Switzer, Richard, 0-1-3-2; 

Tarlton, Thomas O.. 1-1-1-0 ; Tarry, William R., 0-2-1-0 : 
Tate, Harold, 1-3-1-0 : Taylor, Ed, 20-8-1-5 : Taylor. Frank. 
3-0-0-0 : Taylor, Jesse, 0-2-0-0 : Thomas, Billy G., 0-6-0-1 : Thom- 
as. Patrick H., 2-0-0-0 ; Thomas, Paul Ed.. 1-2-1-0 : Thompson, 
Houston C, 0-0-1-0 : Thompson, Jack, 0-1-0-0 : Thompson, 
Kenneth E., 9-5-0-0 : Thompson. Larry, 0-3-0-0 : Thompson, 
Thomas A., 16-7-3-2 : Thompson, Thomas D., 0-0-2-2 ; Thornton, 
Daniel A.. 0-2-0-0 : Tillery, James Carl, 4-15-3-1 : Tillery, 
William E., 0-1-1-1 : Tinslev. Marion P.. 14-20-8-4 ; Tremaine, 
Darrell, 0-0-0-1 : Trent, William W., 0-0-1-0 ; Triplett, Herbert 
W., 60-28-4-0: Turner. Aaron, 2-9-3-5: Tyre. Donald. 5-17-6-0: 

Uhl. Ronald K., 0-0-0-1; Ulrey. William R., 1-0-0-0; Urlage. 
Richard, 11-23-2-0; 

VanHook, Samuel, 0-1-0-0 ; Van Meter, Kay Don, 2-3-1-1 : 
Van Meter, McNeill, 0-3-1-1 ; Vannerson, Duke, 0-0-0-1 ; Van- 
over, J. W., 2-15-0-0 : Vanover. Wiley G., 4-18-0-0 ; Van Zant. 
Jim. 12-15-0-0; Varble, William, 2-11-2-2: Vaughan, Ronald. 



0-1-0-0 : Vaughn. Ronald B., 0-1-0-0 ; Vaughn, Teddy Ray, 
0-4-0-1 ; Vermillion. C. D., 8-7-0-0 : Vescovi. Raymond B., 
0-7-4-0 ; Vest, Thomas, 0-2-0-0 ; Vipperman. Albert, 2-5-0-0 ; 
Vittatoe, David, 0-1-0-0 ; Voorhis, Ken, 0-2-2-0 : Vories, Dick, 
3-10-1-1 : 

Walker, Paul R.. 0-2-0-0 ; Wallace, Curt, 2-0-1-0 ; Waller, 
Bobbie E., 10-16-3-0 : Walsh, Bernard N., 0-1-1-0 : Walton, Roy. 
4-10-6-5 ; Ward, Robert L.. 2-15-5-0 ; Warrix, Lewis H.. 2-11- 
2-4 ; Watts. Leon, 1-0-0-0 : Way. James, 2-0-0-0 ; Weaver. 
Clyde Ivan. 0-1-0-0 ; Weaver, Ray, 6-11-2-0 ; Weihe, Robert J., 
0-7-0-1 : Weiner. Dick. 1-5-2-0 : Wells, Glenn, 4-5-2-4 : Wesche, 
James A., 2-9-4-0 : West. John, 0-14-3-2 : Westerfield, Thomas 
W., 0-3-3-6 : Weyer, James, 6-5-0-0 : Whaley. Ronald Joe, 
0-3-2-0 ; Wheeler, Joe H., 1-5-0-1 : Whitaker, James, 0-1-0-1 ; 
White, David B., 1-3-4-3; Wickham, James R., 11-15-6-1: Wil- 
cox, Ursal R.. 0-1-0-0 ; Williams. Benny, 0-1-0-0 : Williams. 
David. 0-1-0-0 : Williams. Jack A., 2-5-2-0 : Williams. James 
H., 0-1-2-0 : Williams, Larry H.. 0-1-1-0 ; Williams, Paul W.. 
8-3-1-0 ; Williams, Roger. 25-21-2-0 : Williams. S. Jack. 2-6-1-0 ; 
Williamson. Fred, 0-1-0-0 ; Winchester. Roy L., 20-32-9-3 : Win- 
frey. Shelby. 34-18-5-0 ; Wingfield, Felix G., 9-6-1-1 : Wirtz, 
Howard A.. 0-2-2-1 ; Wise. Billy V., 31-15-2-1 : Wise, Jack. 
45-12-2-1 : Wise. Larry. 0-1-0-0 : Withrow. Rov D.. 7-10-2-1 : 
Witten, Clifford, 0-0-0-1 : Wolfe. Jack. 1-3-1-0 : Wolfe, Paul 
Allen. 4-5-1-0 : Wolfe, Roger Dean, 0-0-1-0 : Wood, James 
Randall. 0-7-1-0: Woods. Gene B., 1-10-2-0; Woosley, Travis. 
1-15-3-3 ; Wooten. George B., 1-4-1-1 ; Woprice. Ronald J.. 
3-16-2-1 : Wray. Robert F., 0-3-0-0 ; Wright. H. W.. 0-3-1-3 : 
Wi-ight, James Lloyd. 3-3-1-0 : 

Yelton. Gene B., 2-1-0-0 ; Yewell. Morgan R.. 0-1-0-2 ; York. 
Jim, 3-14-3-1 ; Young, Dannv, 2-1-1-4. 



Registered Football Officials 
of the K.H.S.A.A. -1968 

(List Compiled September 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed it is 
the home phone unless otherwise designated. If two numbers are 
given the first number is that of the home phone. 

Adams. Calvin K.. 5891-B Adams St.. Fort Knox, 624-8287, 

624-4128 
Adams. Charles David, 4800 Andrea Way, Louisville, 964-5419 
Adams, Michael Lynn. 509 Brockton, Richmond, 623-4787 
Adams. Richard W.. 20 Bartlett Ave., Madisonville, 821-1381, 

821-5246 
Ahrens, James, 112 Ward, Bellevue, 261-3304, 831-7166 
Albright. James R., Route 3, Highland Manor, Shelbyville, 

633-4614 
Allen. Arthur. Route 6, Franklin, 586-6836. 686-3231 
Allen. Clyde E., Jr., 5216 Coolbrook Road, Louisville. 239-0190, 

372-6969 
Allender. Raymond L., Route 1, Coxs Creek, 348-9386 
Allison, Roy, 1111 Entrada, Frankfort, 875-1871, 564-3740 
Anders, Raleigh A., Route 5, Box 73-A, London. 864-6217, Cor. 

bin 528-1837 
Anderson. Glenn S.. Jr.. P. O. Box 286, Prestonsburg, 886-3929, 

886-3552 
Anderson, John Grant, P. O. Box 244. Prestonsburg, 886-2278, 

886-3652 
Ashworth, Paul, 1044 Belvoir Lane, Cincinnati. Ohio. 251-5461, 

421-5700. ext. 485 
Ayres, Edward L., 625 Laramie Drive, Lexington, 277-2333. 

277-1161. ext. 44 
Back, Phillip A., P. O. Box 155, Whitesburg, 633-7190, 855-4001 
Baisden, Leo E., Jr., 2131 Seventh St., Portsmouth, Ohio, 

353-2391 
Ballaban, Tom, 1103 Archland Drive, Cincinnati. Ohio, 522-3024, 

761-7600 
Bartels, John. 423 Third St.. Dayton, 581-4250 
Bates. Bob. 1120 Meadow Lane. Portsmouth. Ohio. 354-21G8, 

353-1161 
Batterton, Keith, 340 N. College, Harrodsburg, 734-9624 
Battisti, Edward A., 510 Brockton, Richmond, 623-2457 
Beatty. David E., 2338 Dixon St.. Ashland, 324-2663. 324-1155, 

ext. 360 
Beheler, Donard Stuardt, 218 Doyle Ave., Paris, 987-1728, Le.x- 

ington 233-2000, ext. 3236 
Bell. Clarence T., 3812 Meadow Haven Road. Louisville. 239-0782, 

582-5573 
Bellissemo. Frank J., 3524 McHenery Road, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

662-6636 
Bennett, Howard, Route 6. Mayfield, 247-3309, 247-3510 
Bennett, John S., 1310 Olive Blvd., Murray, 753-5689 
Benzinger, Joseph, Jr., 3602 Behymer Road, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

752-3932, 742-2193 
Bero, James, P. O. Box 968, Williamson, W. Va. 
Berry, Layman T., Jr., 5 Steiner Blvd., Bai-boursville, W. Va. 
Bewley, Harry G., 306 Estate Drive, Elizabethtown, 765-5018, 

769-2311 
Blackburn. Adrian, 407 Scott Court. Prestonsburg, 886-2401 
Blackburn, Tennyson R., P. O. Box 2167. Williamson, W. Va. 
Blair. Ray, P. O. Box 249, Route 3. Proctorville, Ohio, 886-6632, 

629-1311 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 



1968 



Page Nine 



Blake, Jease L., 503 Tennessee Ave.. Pineville, 337-6272 
Blanton, Homer, 138 New Hampshire, Ashland, 324-1730, 

324-1730 
Blosser, Kermit A.. 80 Maplewood Drive, Athena, Ohio, 593-3007, 

694-6452 
Bocook, Earl, 1102 Beech St., Kenova, W. Va. 
Boemker, Bob, 69 Thompson, Fort Mitchell, 331-1708, 721-2700, 

ext. 350, 398 
Bordy. Phil, 3308 Stratford. Louisville, 468-7005, 582-3994 
Boswell, Martin, Route 1, Providence, 667-5143, 249-3132 
Boyles, Jerry, 2700 Algonquin, Ashland, 324-6995. 324-1111, 
ext. 5443 „, ,„,, 

Bradford, Robert L., 76 Southview, Fort Thomas, 781-1^17, 
733-5600 . ,,„„,„- 

Bramble, James L., 153 Manitoba Lane, Lexington, 277-9477, 

255-1461, ext. 212 
Brashear, Loy Bay, Route 1, C.lendale, 854-2921, 361-3147 
Branch, Charles J., 117 Westview Drive, Bardstown, 348-3218, 

348-3991, ext, 10 
Brizendine. Vic, 2711 Lakeside Drive. Louisville. 464-6843, 

589-9111 
Brock, Alben, Kettle Island, 337-3848 
Brock, John H,, 228 Madison Ave.. Richmond. 623-4833, 

623-4969 
Brown, Bill, 2553 Dell Road, Louisville, 458-4857, 583-0681 
Brown, Herman G., Route 2, Shelbyville, 633-2516. Louisville 

689-9180 
Brown, J. W. "Scoop," 975 Waverly Drive, Lexington, 262-09u4, 

252-3212 
Bullock, Ted, 2622 Clays Mill Road, Lexington, 277-0145, 256-1060 
Bunn, Gary L., 2718 First Ave.. Huntington. W. Va. 
Bunnell. John, 3206 Carriage Lane. Humboldt. Tenn.. 784-1655. 

784-9614 
Burgess, Marvin C, 612 Lynnwood, Bowling Green. 842-5561, 

842-2411, ext. 32 
Burgess, Oley, Sr,, 1708 Syc St., Kenova, W. Va. 
Burke. David D., 533 Broom St., Ashland, 324-3047, 324-2144, 

ext. 276 
Burke, Harry R., 328 Arnold Ave., Prestonsburg, 886-2796, 

886-2385 
Burkhart, James G., P. O. Box 169, Loyall, 573-1437, 664-3444 
Burton, James, 401 Barbour St., Providence. 667-2296, 667-5360 
Byars, Michael Kirk, 3531 Lansdowne Drive, Lexington, 

278-3530, 255-0802 
Cain, Paul D.. 3196 Lookout Circle, Cincinnati, Ohio, 321-7246, 

871-6103 
Calitri, Don, Union College, Baibourville, 646-3775, 646-4151, 

ext. 133 
Canaday, Jacy Glenn, 503 Brown St., Vine Grove, 877-5637, 

877-6387 
Canady, Ray B., Court Square, Barbourville, 546-4766, 646-3801 
Canter, John, 2826 Esther Blvd.. Louisville. 461-8218, 687-8862 
Carlberg, John H., P. O. Box 234, Muldraugh, 942-2723, 

942-2730 
Carlberg, Ralph C, 1501 Elm, West Point, 922-4456 
Carlson, David A., 2916 Washington St,, Padueah, 444-7943, 

444-6311, ext. 408 
Carr, Billy Wilson, 411 Longview Drive, Franklin, 586-6356 
Carr, John Leonard, 607 Chinn St., Raceland, 836-8949 
Carrico, John, 3831 Chatham Road, Louisville, 458-4007, 

582-4625 
Cecil, A. Morris, 14 Shaw Lane, Fort Thomas, 441-8427, 

381-1480 
Chinn, Ralph, 3205 Hampton St„ Ashland, 324-0683 
Cisco, Robert N., 403 Highland Ave., Vine Grove, 877-6548, 

624-7724 
Clark, John E., P. O. Box 341, Cynthiana. 234-4605, 234-1035 
Clark, Lou, 2315 Brighton Drive, Louisville, 459-3540 
Clark, Owen B.. 137 Showalter Drive. Georgetown 
Clark, Robert L.. 303 Southern Drive, Clarksville, Tenn., 

647-2196 
Clemmons. Sam. 635 Central, Lexington, 255-7566, 255-7986 
demons. Glen C, 90 Allison Lane, Jeffersonville, Ind., 282-7498, 

636-3711 
Cochran, Roy H., Jr., 609 Master, Corbin, 528-1697, 864-4330 
Collins, Ronald K., 2590 Old Buttermilk, Villa Hills, 341-0578, 

431-9964 
Cook, Richard, 50 Forest Ave., Fort Thomas, 441-9269, 243-3531 
Copley, Sidney M., P. O. Box 362, Delbarton, W. Va. 
Cornwell, James, 506 S. Main St., Franklin, 686-4327, 586-4451 
Cowan. B. L.. Sr.. 9615 Walnutwood Way. Jeffersontown. 

267-6224. 587-1121. ext. 387 
Craft. Albert B.. 346 Glendale Ave.. Lexington, 264-6365, 254-0764 
Creekmore, Les, 316 Walnut St., Bellevue, 431-5259. 421-2283 
Crider, Ray, 1120 Franelm Road, Louisville, 368-1196, 774-7379 
CuUen, Charles "Bud," 3010 Don Dee Drive, Louisville, 451-3322. 

895-0523 
Curnutte. James R.. 201 E. 8th Ave.. Huntington, W. Va. 
Current, Ellis Ray, 1933 Bellefonte Drive, Lexington, 277-1049, 

278-5463 
Dallman, James W., 12 Center St., Jeffersonville. Ind., 

283-7255 
Daniel. Ernest H., 2317 Bath Ave., Ashland, 324-2785, 324-1155, 

ext. 262 
Daniels, Robert M., 18 Beechwood Road, Fort Mitchell, 331-4155, 
331-4165 



Davis, A. J., P. O. Box 688, Hazard, 436-5665, 436-2138 

Davis, Curt. 1119 E. Burnett. Louisville, 634-4969, JU 2-3611, 

ext. 471 
Davis, Ralph C, :326 S. 7th St., Ironton, Ohio, 532-8606, 

632-8143 
Deaton, Daniel E., P. O. Box 362, Matewan, W. Va. 
Dennedy. Bob, 5083 Orangelawn Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

922-8362, 922-2300 
Dent, Donald, 1746 Dixdale Ave.. Louisville, 776-3573, 366-4561 
Denton, Charles, 127 Hubbard Lane, Henderson, 826-4020, 

826-9533 , . .,, .,.., ,,„., 

Denton. William J.. 303 Bakers Court, Louisville, .,63-0361, 

684-9271 
Detenber, Gene, 229 Tyne Road, Louisville, 895-7058 
Devine, Edward, 1413 Bluegrass, Louisville. 368-3757 
Dial. Charles R.. 3300 Monel Ave.. Huntington. W. Va. 
Dial Jack W., 3179 Sumner Ave.. Huntington. W. Va. 
Dizney. Alan. 206 Fourth St.. Corbin. 528-3313. 528-4606 
Dorsey James. 4062 Vinedale, Cincinnati, Ohio, 471-8050 
Douthwaite. Donald Dennis. 6616 Menvin Ave.. Cincinnati. 

Ohio. 661-0916. 662-0891 
Downey. Robert F.. 327 26th St.. Dunbar. W. Va. „,„„„„, 

Downs. Joseph W.. 829 Bartley. Bardstown. 348-5123. 348-3991 
Drake. Richard R.. 72 Donnelley Drive. Fort Thomas. ''''1-4235 
Draud. Jon E.. 2441 Alex. Park. Southgate. 441-0223. 431-6157 
Dryden. Wallace Lee. 163 E. Maxwell. 3A. Lexington. 262-2733. 

254-4017 
Due. Larry E.. 514 Edgar Court. Erianger. 341-4155 
Duff. Earl. P. O. Box 841. Hazard. 436-2725 
Duff. William Curtis. Jr.. 1905 Cambridge Drive. Lexington. 
255-6057. 265-0716 ^„ .,,, 

Duncan. Gilbert F.. 3110 Commander. Louisville. 458-6144, 

366-9661, ext. 537 
Durbin, Roy, 2911 Dale Ann Drive, Louisville, 452-1730, 587-1121, 

ext. 265 
Dwelle. Ray S., 4404 Jonlyn Court, Louisville, 893-2008, 

582-2621, ext. 207 
Edwards, Sonny. 508 Jeff., Milton. W. Va.. 743-6622 
Egan. Joseph P., 2036 Deauville Drive, Lexington, 233-1667, 

255-3612. ext. 66 
Eldridge- Wavne R.. Science Hill. 423-3496. 678-8161 
Elliott, Carroil L.. 307 College, Elizabethtown, 765-4007, 765-6118 
Ellis. Johnny, P. O. Box 331. Prestonsburg. 886-2751, 886-3080 
Elovitz, Carl,' 1920 Spring Grove Ave., Lexington. 277-3994, 

873-4901 
Engle. Orville. 128 Oak St.. Pineville. 337-''916 
Edwards. Ernest S., Jr.. 823 S. 39th St.. Louisville. 774-5496, 

584-0201 
Ernst. Edward R.. P. O. Box 76040. Cincinnati. Ohio. 689-7181 
Fain. George, 234 Barham Drive Milan, Tenn.. 686-7557. 686-1537 
Fallon, Robert J., 142 Pear. Hazard. 436-4528. 436-2161 
Farina. Lawrence. 3802 E. Heatherbrae, Phoenix, Ariz.. 

956-2287. 267-3126 
Faust Jack. 2427 Concord Drive. Louisville. 634-4204, 584-6236 
Fay John C. 319 C. Street. Price Road Lexington.. 233-1982 
Feck. Richard A.. 418 Noithside Drive. Lexington. 299-8025 
Fenimore Clarke E.. 3943 Kennison Ave., Louisville, 896-4716, 

282-1301 
Ferguson. Roy F.. Route 3, Barbourville. 546-3893. 546-4007 
Fields. Rickey P.. 209 Long Ave.. Wh'tesbin-g 
Fields. Ronald Mac. 1673 Country Club Road, Henderson, 

826-9859. 826-8381 
Pish, Leland G., 826 Oak Hill. Lexington. 255-7156 
Fitznatrick, Kenneth L.. 104 Wooton, Hazard. 436-4125. 436-2212 
Fletcher. John L.. 5723 B. B'-own. Fort Knox. 624-2079. 624-5851 
Flynn Robert D.. 428 McKenna Court. Lexington. 299-5002, 

255-2481 
Fortnev- Robert Lee. 2817 Breck. Lane. Louisville, 468-1079. 

582-3511. ext. 472 
Fostev. Pevryman E., 927 Waverly Drive. Lexington. 255-7374. 

252-2312 
Foster. .J. W. 292 Winn Way Drive, Lexington, 277-8636, 

256-6666 
Fralev. Bill. 1604 Lee Drive, Henderson, VA 7-3232 
Frankel, Louis S., 3723 Stanton Blvd., Louisville, 454-6519, 

454-6519 
Franklin Clifford. 10162 Zig Zag Road, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

891-3667. 261-4828 
Franklin. James A.. 2913 Hackworth St.. Ashland. 325-3934, 

324-1111, ext. 5528 
Prazer, Tom Roe. Route 1. Sturgis. 333-4412, 333-4672 
Freese, OUie, 5518 Mapleridge, Cincinnati, Ohio, 661-5398, 

351-7010 
Fritsch, Bill. Route 4. Milan. Tenn.. 686-1764. 686-7401. ext. 48 
Fryrear. Bill P., 204 Lanark Dell, Middletown, 245-0334, 

454-7611, ext. 4846 
Fucci. Dom. 752 Wellington, Lexington, 277-6327. 254-8555 
Fugate. E. Hugh, 1115 Louisville Road, Frankfort, 223-1340, 

564-3990 
Fuller, Wilton. 633 Hill'-n-Dale. Lexington. 277-6654. 266-0115 
Gallaher, Jack, 2947 Adams Ave.. Ashland. 326-'.420. 324-2142 
Gallion. Arlie, Jr., 2656 Riverside Drive. St. Albans. W. Va. 
Galuk. Walter M.. 1619 Bath Ave.. A.shlnnd. 325-3305. 326-1751 
Garrett. Richard A.. P. O. Box 37. Simpaonville. 722-8868, 
722-8995 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1968 



Gentry, Dale J., 4945 Determine, Louisville. 447-5981, 585-5814 
George, Boyce D., 2203 Wrocklage. Louisville, 454-4993 
Gettler, John F., 705 Providence Road. Lexington 
Gfell, George V.. 3319 Coldstream, Lexington, 269-1218 
Gilbert. Gerald L.. 508 Highland. Vine Grove. 877-5094. Fort 

Knox, 4-7719 
Gilkerson, Pat H.. Route 1. Box 38. Prichard. W. Va. 
Gilligan. John W., 1146 Tassie Lane. Cincinnati. Ohio, 522-2042 
Gilman. Ronald, Route 1, Box 183, Delbarton, W. Va. 
Gish, James. 128 N. Ingram St.. Henderson 
Gore. Bailey, Murray State University, Murray, 753-5809, 

762-6286 
Gorham, Harry C, 117 Hamilton Park. Lexington. 255-4165, 

252-2011 
Gour, Bob. 218 S. Lee, Bowling Green. 843-9582. 842-0316 
Grace, Charles K., Cypress Street, Pineville, 337-3331, 337-2348 
Grace, Hickory. Middlesboro. 248-1290, Pineville 337-3320 
Graham. Jim. 2569 Bradley Drive, Ashland, 324-8169, 324-1163, 

ext. 376 
Greene. Therman R.. USA Equipt. Mtn. GP.. Fort Knox 
Grieco. Joseph R., 2703 Shaffer. Cincinnati. Ohio, 661-3346 
Giffey. Richard, P. O. Box 1425, Williamson. W. Va. 
Guinn. Bill, 4600 Country Club Blvd., South Charleston, W. Va. 
Hadden, Newell P.. Jr., 942 Wolf Run Road, Lexington 
Hagan, Joe, 3000 Sherbrooke Road, Louisville, 458-1325, 451-7424 
Hagerman, Bart, 1912 Ashland Ave., Ashland. 325-4227, 

324-1111. ext. 6462 
Hall, Charles E., 425 Yale, Lexington, 278-3995, 299-6212 
Hall. Dale L., 31 Candy Lane, Chesapeake, Ohio, 867-3370, 

529-7191, ext. 249 
Hall. Richard T., 2960 Rio Rita, Louisville, 458-6611, 585-5893 
Hall. William C, Route 2, Eminence. 845-5628, 582-2658 
Hall, William W.. 474 South Highland. Prestonsburg. 886-3415, 

886-3648 
Hamilton. Vernon K,. 4213 Kirby Ave.. Cincinnati, Ohio. 

681-4284. 481-7310 
Hammock. Don L-. 1512 Audubon Pkwy., Louisville, 636-7111, 

683-5604 
Hammons, J. S..107 Sycamore, Barbourville, 546-4720 
Hancock. Norb, 3823 Mamaroneck. Louisville, 451-7368 
Hansel. John T.. Jr.. 711 Maryland Drive. Whitesburg, 633-2646 
Harding, Artell, 309 Fonville. Martin, Tenn., 587-3363 
Harmon. H. Clay, Jr.. Dewitt. 642-2201 

Harris, David L.. 505 N. 4th St., Bardstown. 348-5733, 348-3311 
Harris, Russell, 368 Boiling Spring, Lexington. 264-6526, 252-0284 
Harris. Tom. Jr., 230 Barham. Milan. Tenn.. 686-3325, 686-3731 
Harrison, William H., HQ. Co. Com. Gp. USATCA, Fort Knox, 

624-6123. 624-7911 
Harsh, Ronald B.. 211 Oxford Place. Louisville. 893-2335 
Hawkins. Don, Route 1. Ekron. 828-3631. 828-2447 
Heaberlin. Bill. Washington Avenue. Flatwoods. 836-6915 
Hedge. David William, 321 Mockingbird Drive, Jeffersonville, 

Ind., 283-3962. 283-3155 
Heinichen, Carl C, 1941 Shollenberger Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

931-7997. 931-7997 
Heinze, Frank. 204 Maple Ave.. Prestonsburg, 886-2436. 377-2481 
Heinze. John G., 39 Highlond Ave., Prestonsburg, 886-2196, 

886-2708 
Hendon, L. J.. 228 S. 15th. Murray. 753-3668. 753-2825 
Hensley. Larry, 226 E. High St.. Lexington, 252-2493, 299-1221, 

ext. 2117 
Herrick. Calvin P.. Jr., 200 S. Arnold Ave., Prestonsburg, 

886-3494, 886-2311 
Hicks, Lloyd, 6253 Springmever Drive, Cincinnati. Ohio, 

662-5103, 771-6360, ext, 452 
Hill, Earl P., Route 6. P. O. Box 141, London, 864-2521, 
Hina. Charles W., Route 1, Box 202, Sturgis, 333-4409 

864-2128 
Hofstetter, Joe, P. O. Box 1815. Williamson. W. Va. 
Holland, David W.. 303 Court Drive, Fulton. 472-3666. 472-3626 
Holman. Joseph B.. 2101 St. Teresa Drive, Lexington, 266-7046, 

256-6812. ext. 446 
Holman. S. T.. 207 Second St., Corbin, 528-5197, 528-3213 
Holthouser, Terry W., 5322 Georgia Lane, Louisville, 964-2950, 

239-3267 
Horsman, Bill, 2902 S. 5th St., Louisville, 637-1201, 583-7621 
Houchin. Thomas, 8105 Arnoldtown Road, Louisville, 937-0254, 

774-7379 
Howard. Robert E., Kettle Island. 337-6368, 337-5260 
Huber, Carl W., 126 N. 37th St.. Louisville. 774-3387 
Huber, Jerry, 2873 W. McMicken, Cincinnati, Ohio. 681-0897, 

431-5723 
Hughes. Paul P.. 520 Riverside Drive. Prestonsburg 886-6471, 

886-2170 
Humphrey, Joe. 2937 Montgomery Ave.. Ashland, 324-7523, 

324-4111 
Hunter, Charles. P. O. Box 443. Evarts. 837-2817, 837-2327 
Hunter, James, 4219 Naneen Drive, Louisville, 367-1361 
Hurley. K. E., 3205 Christie Place, Owensboro 

Huston. Roderick J., 7482 Apt. H.. Fort Knox. 4-4485. 4-2838 
Idol, Billy Joe, 124 Leafwood Road, Middlesboro. 248-2837 
Idol. Lloyd. Jr.. 116 Leafwood Road. Middlesboro. 248-6761 
Ingram. William, Det. C 12th MP Gp. (Cl. Fort Knox. 4-7455, 

4-7457 
Isaacs. Jack. Bellefonte Road, Flatwoods, 836-5490, Ashland 

324-1155, ext. 374 
Isaacs. John Frederick. 259 Argonne Circle, Lexington, 277-2498, 

233-2000, ext. 3874 



Isaacs. Marvin D., 3229 Deborah Lane. Cincinnati, Ohio, 

622-0988, 771-3100, e.xt. 33 
Ishmael. Stephen A., 1203 Gallant Fox Run, Louisville, 426-2597 
Jacoby, Ben, 127 Showalter Drive, Georgetown, 863-0508, 

265-6812, ext. 12 
James. Gene, 1607 S. 3rd St., Ironton, Ohio, 532-6976, 632-6224 
Jarrell, Frank W., P. O. Box 46, Ceredo, W. Va. 
Jenkins. Beryl, 2326 S. 11th St., Ironton, Ohio, 532-5216 
Jenkins, Kean, P. O. Box 432, Elizabethtown 
Johnson, Bernard M.. 322 Blueberry Lane, Lexington 
Johnson. Charles Larry, 9124 Kenlock. Louisville, 425-0531, 

637-8786 
Johnson, Gordon M., 1011 Garred St.. Pikeville, 347-4758, 

437-6126 
Johnson. Harry A.. Jr.. 348 Friedman Ave.. Paducah, 443-1767, 

444-6311, ext. 462 
Johnson. Robert F., 3310 Springhaven. Catlettsburg. 739-4028, 

324-1155. ext. 667 
Johnson. Stan W., 3500 Ashlawn. Owensboro, 684-2167 
Jones. George W., 6207 Pine Drive, Huntington. W. Va. 
Jones. J. Carl. 1904 Goodwin Ave., Corbin, 528-2349. 628-2450 
Jones, John H., Route 1. Adolphus. SeottsvlUe. 62^2-6200 
Jones. Paul. 1166 Ojibwa. Frankfort, 227-6648. 564-4718 
Jones. Paul D., 421 Torrence Court, Cincinnati, Ohio, 871-2950, 

475-2737 
Jump, Frank E.. 200 Elizabeth, Bowling Green. 842-8060, 

843-4707 
Junker. Edwin G.. 1045 W. Seymour, Cincinnati. Ohio. 821-4117 
Kallaher. James E.. 2503 Morehouse Ave.. Elkhart. Ind., 

293-4263, CO 4-8609 
Kasperski. Harry W., 3662-B Fincastle Road. Louisville, 

461-1065. 682-5215 
Kathman. Bernie, 3060 Elmwood Drive, Fort Mitchell. 341-7369. 

621-7541 
Kaufman, Alvin R., 8215 St. Anthony Ch. Road. Louisville, 

366-0126. 587-0871 
Kellv, John Joseph, 216 N. 1st St., Danville. 236-6194. 236-4370 
Kelly, William G., 421-A "A" Street, Fort Knox. 624-7887, 

624-1957 
Kemper, Russ, 5732 Lauderdale, Cincinnati, Ohio. 931-6222, 

621-4380 
Kerr, Kenneth, 10806 Grafton Hall, Valley Station. 937-3008, 

585-4000 
Kimble. Frank, P. O. Box 2173. Williamson, W. Va. 
King, Allen. Route 1, Box 482, Hendei-son, 826-9647, 826-3321 
Kirk. Charles Floyd, Main Street, Benham. 848-2039 
Kirkhart. David R.. 928 Glenway Drive, South Charleston, 

W. Va. 
Kiser. Larry L.. 10.000 Thinton Lane, Fern Creek. 239-0648, 

969-1321 
Kr-aft, H. Nellis. 2606 Delor Ave., Louisville, 637-8195, 584-4253 
Kratzenberg. Ralph. 2412 South 10, Ironton. Ohio. 523-6741 
Lally. James J.. 1210 Ross Ave., Cincinnati. Ohio. 471-3644, 

421-5700. ext. 624 
Lambert. Irvin, 5110 Rural Way, Louisville 
Landers, John F., 32 Charlemagne, Clarksville. Tenn.. 647-2656, 

798-3320 
Lange, William E., Jr., 5515 Ken Lane, Louisville. 935-4710. 

368-2681 
Law, William J., 1072 Pamela Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio, 231-2479, 

441-0068 
Lawson. Leiand, 949 Deporres. Lexington. 254-1009. 264-8074 
Leahy. Pat. 2907 Cromarty Way, Louisville. 459-2066. 687-1121. 

ext. 472 
Lefevers. Colman J.. Kettle Island, 337-3808 
Lehkamp, Kenneth H.. 41 Dale Ave.. Fort Thomas. 441-1476, 

635-2191 
Lenaham, Thomas. 4309 Retreat Road. Louisville. 964-4636, 

582-8696 
Levy. Arthur E.. Route 2. Box 74-A. Williamson, W. Va. 
Lewis. Johnnie D.. 807 White St., Cumberland. 589-4418 
Lewis, Lae V.. 103A Fifth Ave., Cumberland, 689-4196 
Ley. Jack, 17 N. Shannon Avenue. Athens. Ohio. 693-3629, 

694-7467 
Liebert. Gil. 230 Clover Lane. Louisville. 895-9167 
Lillie, William Westly. 3018 Tayloi-sville Road. Louisville, 

451-0662. 582-2668 
Lindon. Bob, 2208 Jasmine, Lexington. 278-2439. Frankfort 

664-3070 
Lingo. Henrv E., 424 W. Main St.. Vine Grove. 877-2345. 

877-5637 
Linkes. Clifford, Science Hill, 423-2171. 678-8111 
Litton, John Lilburn. 3128 Calvin St., Ashland. 324-5200 
Lloyd. Birt Leonard. 4223 Auburn Road. Huntington. W. Va. 
Logan, Eli, 421 Poplar, Hazard. 436-5018. 436-2151 
Long. James E.. P. O. Box 73, Baskett, VA 7-5000. VA 7-1867 
Lotz. Robert W.. 10.3 Buttercup, Louisville. 239-3976. 634-9491 
Lowe. Gene T., Route 6, Box 28, London, 864-5724, 864-2207 
Lowe, Stan. P. O. Box 337. Russellville, 726-6647. Nashville. 

Tenn.. 242-6431 
Lusby, George, 615 Pueblo Trail. Georgetown. 863-1440. 863-1170 
Lykins, James O.. 90 Allison Drive. Florence. 371-9531 
McComas, Mike. 6183 Rosalind Road. Huntington. W. Va., 

736-6892. 625-0311 
McConachie. Bud. 2816 Coleen Court, Louisville, 895-1537, 

361-1266 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1968 



Page Eleven 



Way. Frankfort, 223-581)7. 
Helm St., Henderson, 



223-'..S..7 
826-6314, 



r>lS0, 



Court. Cincinnati. Ohio. 



Pinevill 



337-213 



I'^rank- 



McCormick, Don R.. Vicki 
McCoi-mick. Donald, 1413 

827-1792 
McCowan, Connell, Route 1, Box 251. Corbin, 528-4932 
McCoy. Harold T.. 2994 Penn. Ave. Charleston. W. Va. 
McCoy, Larry, 503 Wilderness Road, Louisville, 36 

634-3611 
McDaniel. Alan Curtis, 507 Brockton, Richmond, 623-2457 
McDougal, Alf, 144 Southland Blvd., Louisville, 363-5292, 

282-8961 
McFadden, Jimmie, 649 Northside Drive, Lexington. 299-1635. 

264-9366 
McGehee. Gordon, 733 Forest Lane, Covington, 261-6880 
McGuire. Jack, 6421 Six Mile Lane, Louisville, 469-4031 
McKenzie, Robert L., 1809 Chestnut St., Kenova, W. Va. 
McLane. Albert I.. Route 1, Glendale, 862-4579, 862-3924 
McLemore. Jack T., 217 Merriman Road, Louisville, 893-5232, 

684-1211 
McMiUen, J. N., 1354 Carter, Ashland. 836-8054. 324-6191 
McNabb. Edsar. 16 Beechwood. Fort Mitchell, 331-3113. 331-1220 
McNamee. Jack. 3616 Muddycreek. Cincinnati. Ohio, 922-5207 
McPeek, Talmadge. 600 Beth Ann Drive. Flatwoods. 836-4540. 

836-5201 
Mahan. James R., 7 Columbine 

522-4788, 475-2635 
Madon. Robert L., Catalpa Street. 

fort 664-4890 
Malone, James F, 
Maioney, Ross H, 

895-2020 
Marcum. Bruce, 1250 College Ave.. Barboursville, W. Va. 
Markham. James R.. 2069 F'ontaine. Lexington. 266-3892 
Martin, Thomas F., 142 Park St.. Pikeville, 437-7994. 437-4527 
Matarazzo, S. M., 1602 Keenland Drive, Murray. 763-8354. 

762-2447 
Mattingly, Charles "Pete." 3813 Poplar Level Road. Louisville. 

459-6085 
May. E. B.. Jr.. Box 185. Prestonsburg. 886-3414. 886-8661 
Mayhew. William M.. 906 Pawnee Drive, Elizabethtown, 

766-2706. Fort Knox 4-6953 
Maynard. William D., 651 Indian Branch Road, Kenova. W. Va. 
Melmige. James. Jr.. P. O. Box 2117. Williamson. W. Va. 
Mercke. Frank R.. 417 Lotis Way. Louisville. 896-8460. 634-9491 
Mercker. George E.. 803 Republic Bldg.. Louisville. 451-8399. 

6X2-1645 
Metcalf. Ken. Route 3. Munfordville, 524-9704, 624-4661 
Metzger. Donald R., 9312 Cloverwood Lane, Fern Creek, 239-9813 
Meyer. Bud, 5319 Lilibet Court, Cincinnati, Ohio, 922-3453, 

381-4S0O 

, 6262 Rosalid Road, Huntington, W. Va. 
Woodlawn. Cincinnati, Ohio, 471-8467, 



200 Padgett, Corbin, 528-2424, 528-9019 
6871 Greenmeadow C, Louisville, 893-2348. 



iller, Edward D. 


. Jr 


illerhaus. Bill. 


530 


921-9722 




iller. Donald R. 


49 


iller. Phillip E.. 


100 



Henry St., Franklin, 686-4989, 
Bravington Way, Lexington. 277-6663, 



Ave.. Erlanger. 
Edgewood Ave. 



341-6827. 563-1100 
Ashland. 324-7741. 



Va. 
864-5114 
Va. 
W. Va. 



Ohio Ave.. Newport, 781-0635 
Raintree Drive, Florence, 371-6526 
Minta, John H., 326 W. Carter Ave., Clarksville. Ind., 283-8553, 

582-3671. ext, 313 
Mitchell. Emmett D.. Ash Grove Pike. Nicholasville. 266-3071, 

254-3871 
Moody. William R.. 2032 Oleander Drive, Lexington, 277-9622, 

265-6612 
Mooneyhan, James H.. 810 

686-4451 
Moore. James A., 754 

277-6116. ext. 365 
Moore. Robert. 441 Forest 
Mordica. William A.. 800 

324-7741 
Morgan. Jimmie Lee. 190 Oney Ave.. Huntington. W 
Morgan. Richard. Route 6, Box 64, London, 864-6511, 
Morris, Gene L., 302 Wilson Court, Huntington, W. 
Morrison. Clifton Darrell. 1209 Balls Gap Boad. Milton 
Morrissey, Rockne, 2012 Trentwood, Dayton. Ohio, 885-2283 
Morse, Richard K.. 163 N. Deepwood. Radcliff, 351-3748, 624-4454 
Moser, Tommy G., 707 Miller St.. Stanford. 365-2596, 365-2159 
Moss. Howard, P. O. Box 1042. Paducah 
Murray, Thomas, 26 Ashton, Fort Mitchell, 331-1891 
Nassida, Frank R., 108 Buckwood Drive, Richmond, 623-9209, 

623-2412 
Nickell. Duane "Red," 2009 Broad. Paducah. 444-6095. Joppa. 

III.. 543-7434 
Niday. Paul. Route 1. Lavalette. Huntington. W. Va. 
Nolan, Michael Bruce. 36 W. Morgantown Road. Bowling 

Green. 842-8978 
Noland, Douglas, Stanford, 366-2609, 365-2619 
Nolly. Thomas Edward, 824 Maple Drive, Sissonville, W, Va. 
Nord. Bertrand J.. 4206 Naomi Drive, Louisville. 969-336D, 

JU 7-7571 
Nord. Gilbert. 6315 Krause. Louisville 

ext. 343 
Norwood, Donald V., Route 6, Franklin 
Norwood, Thomas R., 811 Henry St. 

586-3541 
Odil. William Randall. Route 6. Bowling Green, 843-3633. 

843-1171 
Oldham, Ben Richard, 3360 High Hope Road, Lexington. 

269-1563. 266-0115 
Omer. Billy W., 250 Reed, Madisonville, 821-2833 



447-3133. JU 7-7671. 



586-5119, 586-4636 
Franklin, 686-36U, 



Box 806, Lexington, 266-6152, 266-6162 
602 Meadowbrook Court, Louisville, 368-9631, 



Omer, Harold G., 150 N. Crestmoor, Louisville, 896-4170 
O'Nan. Norman, Route 1, Box 305, Henderson, 7-3968, 6-9578 
O'Neal, Bud, 3628 Kelly Way. Louisville, 468-7940 
Odem, Dale Linton. 409 Chippewa, Jeffersonville, 283-8225, 

584-0371 
Osborne, Ted G., 
Osting, James E.. 

582-3356 
Pace. Donald. 2023 Deauville. Lexington. 262-6535, 255-0398 
Padgett, R. K.. 202i^ College St.. Somerset. 678-6485. 678-4141 
Page. James Neal. 308 Catalpa St.. Pineville. 337-3814. 
Palmer. Carl A.. 10151/.. s. Sixth St., Ironton, Ohio. 
Israel. 1906 S. 28th St., Louisville. 772-2488. 
Bob L.. 8602 Honor Ave.. Louisville, 969-9090, 
586 
, Clyde E., Route 2, Providence. 667-2624, 821-9004 
Gary R.. Route 2, Versailles Road, Lexington. 252-0670. 



Pai*due, 
Parker. 

ext. 
Parsley. 
Paxton. 

252-0570 
Pate. Lloyd W., 

895-5472 
Paulk, John R.. 

924-5602 
Pawley. James 

684-5201. ext 
Peeno. Harry. 124 

331-1981. AX 1 



337-3814 
532-0291 
774-6431 
527-1121. 



608 Ronnie Road, Madist 



Tenn.. 896-3622. 



1711 College Farm Road. Murray. 753-3078. 
6000 Jessamine, Louisville. 936-2126. 



L 
364 

Morris 

4307 



Road. Lookout 
E., Terrace Drive, 



Heights, Covington. 

Mayfield. 247-5932. 

Oak St.. Dyersburg, Tenn.. 



621 Brentmoor Drive. Bowling Green. 842-7894 
Route 3, Barbourville. 546-5261. 546-4007 
Route 3. Box 767. South Point. Ohio. 377-2289 
3510 Barclay Drive. Jeffersontown, 267-5513, 



Pegausch, William 

247-2267 
Palham. William Peter, 214 

286-6649, 285-2323 
Pennington. Mel. 902 Main Ave., Nitro. W. Va. 
Perry. James W.. 708 Spring St.. St. Albans. W. Va. 
Perry, Tom. Route 2. Mt. Sterling. 498-3827 
Phipps, James M., Heidrick, 646-6344. 528-3611 
Pietrowski. Paul. 108 Bishop St.. Corbin. 628-6391 
Pittman. Spencer. Science Hill, 423-3115, 678-5712 
Plate, Arthur C, 6213 Kenwood Hills. Cincinnati. Ohio. 661-4106. 

891-9091 
Porco. Kenneth J.. 3924 Layside Drive. Louisville. 459-3455. 

458-3281 
Potter. Nat D.. 
Powers. Elmer, 
Priode. Charles, 
Pugh, Roy D., 

964-5996 
(Juisenberry, James M.. 1900 Farnsley Road. Louisville. 448-6152. 

366-0940 
Raines. Russell, 1907 Washington Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Ramey. Roy. 312 Central Ave., Prestonsburg, 886-2208. 886-2284 
Randall. Leroy "Lee." U. S. 27, Alexandria, 694-6446, 636-2191 
Rapp, Lowell D.. 1416 S. Fourth St.. Ironton, Ohio, 632-9576 
Rapp, William C. 1836 Woodland. Ironton. Ohio. 632-1983. 

532-7245 
Raque, Ron, 5300 Ronwood, Louisville, 964-2360, 637-9171 
Ray, Bob, 407 Leyton Ave.. Louisville, 425-7654, 426-7654 
Ray, Collis Randle. 809 N. 32nd St.. Paducah, 442-2146 
Ray, Shirley G.. 227 Byron Court. Owensboro. 684-8963, 

684-0104 
Read, Frederick K., 1338 Greenup St.. Covington. 431-6197 
Reddington. Jim, 3824 Glenside Place, Louisville. 462-9689 
Reece. Fred. 149 Elm St.. Versailles 
Reece. Jerry T.. 1992 Spring Station Drive. Lexington. 299-8800, 

564-3070 
Reed, Gordon, 22 Riverside Parkway, Fort Thomas, 441-4946. 

631-5760 
Reeves, Bob, 3318 Camvic Terrace, Cheviot, Ohio. 

(Bus.) 
Renfro, James H.. 4035 Court Ave.. Paducah. 

444-6311. ext. 398 
Rhodes. Cecil. P. O. Box 291, Barbourville. 
Richardson, William H.. 205 Fields Cliff 

633-7217, 633-2339 
Riggins, Jason M.. Jr.. P. O. Box 417, Man. 
Riggs. C. Dennis. 3131 Sudbury. Louisville. 
Riggs, William T.. Route 1. Morganfield, 



481-1377 



443-6611, 

646-4777 

Drive, Whitesburg. 

W. Va. 

461-1278. 897-1767 
389-2210. 389-2210 



Rookwuod Parkway, Lexington, 299-7089. 



928-8800 
Crestwood. 



Va. 



Ring, Bill, 481 

26.5-8492 
Roberson. Ronnie K.. Route 3, Box 329. Ashland. 
Roberts. Kenneth Gary, Route 1, Box 186, 

279-5166, 279-5165 
Robinson. Don L.. 2012 Poplar St.. Kenova. W. Va. 
Robinson, James M., 2517 Lakeview Drive, St. Albans. W. 
Robinson, J. Ward. 3802 Nanz Ave.. Louisville, 895-0631 
Rodgers. Tom H., 327 Scott St., Madisonville, 821-7312, 338-3800 
Roe, Doyle, Jr., "Buddy." Isom. 633-2058. 633-2339 
Rolph, Harold J.. 915 S. 7th St.. Ironton, Ohio. 532-4036. 

532-3231 
Russell. Gary E.. 2112 Gregory Drive. Henderson. 827-2437 
Russell. Joe. Box 109. Russellville. 726-6983. 726-9531 
Russman, Godfrey F., Jr.. 1041 Goss Ave., Louisville, 969-2175, 

636-7420 
Sagers, Robert M.. 494 Morrvue. Cincinnati. Ohio. 922-8230, 

721-6240, ext. 33 
St. Clair. James, 1600 Fifth Ave., Huntington. W. Va. 
Sammons. Terry L., 4308 Burnt Cedar, Louisville, 964-0852. 

587-1121. ext. 252 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1968 



Sanders. Mel, 4300 Kimberly Court, Paducah. 442-3650, Illinois, 

564-4081 
Sapp, Edward, 2806 DcU Brooke, Louisville, 468-8989, 454-7511 
Sauer. Georee E., Jr., 7017 Old Heady Road, Louisville, 267-9715, 

774-2353 
Sayloi-s. Carlee, Route 6, Murray, 753-7979, 924-5602 
Schad, Jim, 816 Yorkhaven Road, Springdale, Ohio, 825-3343, 

825-8844 
Schmidt. Henry R., 410 Kilmory Ave., Louisville, EM 8-5534, 

JU 3-3885 
Schmitt. Paul E.. 3864 Darlene Drive, Louisville, 778-5356, 

772-3656 
Schuble. Charles E.. 2352 Ashwood, Louisville, 459-1774. 

636-1431 
Sconce. John. P. O. Box 903. Lynch. 848-2260 
Scott. W. L.. 1816 McDonald Road, Lexington. 278-2844. 

254-1313 
Seale, Frank E.. 1001 Tates Creek Road. Lexington 
Scale. W. E.. Tates Creek, Lexington, 266-5695. 233-5000. .-xt. 

6725 
Seavers. Joe. 2517 Ann St.. Ludlow, 341-0213. 291-8925 
Selvy. Curt. 118 Earl. Corbin, 628-4677. 528-4677 
Sexton. Steven Carroll, P. O. Box 354. Whitesburg. 633-7114, 

832-4220 
Shanks. Thomas E., 3113 Vogue Ave., Louisville, 454-4203, 

682-5514 
Shaughnessy, Bernard E.. 2129 East Lane. Shively 16. 448-4923. 

583-4854. ext. 21 
Shaw. John H., Terrace Drive. Mayfield. 247-1907 
Shewmaker, Wayne, 206 W. Meadow Drive, Clarksville. Tenn., 

647-7361, 645-5931 
Shields. Neil. Cumberland Avenue, Barbourville. 546-3778, 

546-9945 
Showalter. John. 116 Military. Georgetown. 863-1892 
Simms. Clarence. 610 Linden Ave., Newport. 261-0735 
Sligh. Jim. 607 Sherwood Road. Cynthiana. 234-4345. Mt. Olivet 

724-2301 
Sloan. Wallace. 419 Oread Road. Louisville, 895-1126. 683-0621 
Slone. Earl D.. Route 1. Box 10-D. Corbin. 628-4197, 528-903K 
Small. David E., 2216 Janlyn Road. Louisville. 267-5360. 

896-6176 
Smith. Robert Eugene. 1900 Bashtord Manor Lane. Apt. 93. 

Louisville. 468-3723 
Smith. William E.. 4122 St. John's Terrace. Cincinnati, Ohio. 

791-3082. 731-2341. ext. 268 
Somerville. Robert J.. 6862 Greenmeadow Circle. Louisville. 

895-8003. 583-3859 
South. Stanley P.. Route 3, Winchester. 842-6132. 744-4812 
Spaulding. William E.. 7646 Old Third St., Louisville, 366-1753 
Spath. William J., 4019 Rosemont Ave.. Louisville. 452-9637. 

584-5209 
Spaulding. Johnny !{., 131 McKnight. West Wood, 324-1155. 

ext. 326 (Bus.) 
Speaks. Carl V., 118 Main. Stanford, 366-2109, 365-2109 
Staley. Jerry, 1117 Inca Trail, Georgetown. 863-2775. 863-3321, 

ext. 35 
Staples. Jerry D.. Route 1. Box 203. Henderson. 827-3663. 

826-9085 
Starling. Edward, 819 Vinson St.. Williamson, W. Va. 
Staten, Joe. 4303 Wyola Court, Louisville. 458-7454 
Stephens. Herbert D.. 133 First St.. West Ceredo, W. Va. 
Stevens. William D.. 1033 Claiborne Way, Lexington 266-2678. 

299-1221, ext. 2106 



Stephenson. Harr 
233-8310 



S.. 1612 Hawthorn. Lexington. 299-1767. 
P. O. Box 472, Radeliff, 351-4306 Fort 



Strain, Richard P, 

Knox 624-1231 

Strong. Arnett, 116 Kentucky Blvd.. Hazard. 436-3938. 436-2141 
Stumbo, Jack, 1146 Riverview Lane, Prestonsburg, 886-3363. 

886-3080 

Sucietto, Richard, 6572 Gaines Road, Cincinnati. Ohio. 521-7495. 
761-4130, ext. 310 

Sullivan. A. G., 1921 Goodwin Ave., Corbin, 628-1282. 528-9035 

Sullivan. Don Chris. 2083 Old Nassau Road, Lexington, 

277-6963. 277-6953 
Swarts. Joseph, 135 Lane St., Coal Grove, Ohio. 532-9349 
Swinford. John, 106 S. Elmarch, Cythiana, 234-2562. 234-5821 
Tackett. Jay. Route 2, Stamping Ground. 535-6663 
Talbot. William G.. III. Route 1, Paris, 465-4981, 987-2961 
Taylor, James R., 1901 Ballard St.. Ashland. 324-4841, 324-2175 
Thomas, Bill, 3418 Burrell Drive, Louisville. 447-7521 
Thomas, Frank M., 629i/j S. 44th St., Louisville. 774-2624 
Thomas. Paul E.. P. O. Box 436-A, Franklin Furnace. Ohio. 

574-6111, 574-5111 

Thomas. Raymond E., 1106 Main St., Sturgis, 333-2161, 826-6231 
Thomp.son. Jack. 2347 Saratoga Drive, Louisville, 462-9255, 
454-4685 

Thompson. John Paul. P. O. Box 44, Falling Rock. W. Va. 

Thompson. Tom D.. 97 Carran Drive, Fort Mitchell, 341-1809. 
581-1322, ext. 211 



Thornton, Daniel A.. 119 Stacker Drive. Clarksville, Tenn., 

798-3098, 647-2234 
Timmering, George E., 4109 Manner Gate Drive, Louisville, 

459-2706. 459-2706 
Treas, Joe W.. 609 Green St., Fulton, 472-1604. 472-1836 
Treibly, Charles E.. 2015 Terril Lane. Louisville. 451-8443, 

461-9301 
Troutman. Doyle, P. O. Box 304. Harlan. 673-1349, 837-2502 
Tussey. George, Jr.. Route 2, Box 100-B, Catlettsburg. 739-4617 
Urlage. Richard. 822 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas. 441-5513, 

471-8120 
Van Zant. Jim. P. O. Box 602, Williamson. W. Va. 
Varner, Gene. 612 E. Pike. Cynthiana. 234-2030, 234-1631 
Varner. Bay G.. 737 Kingston Road. Lexington. 299-4145 
Vennell. Robert H.. 2055 Donald Ave.. Huntington. W. Va. 
Vinciguerra. Phillip. Matewan. W. Va. 
Vissman, Charles. 3926 Graf Drive. Louisville 
Wagner, Jim, 3018 Dale Ann Drive. Louisville. 458-9060, 

637-2561 
Waide, Harry D.. 973 Skyline Drive, Madisonville, 821-1139, 

821-3870 
Walker, Julian R.. 670 Hill 'n Dale Road. Lexington. 277-7283. 

Frankfort 564-4840 
Walker. Paul R., 10th and High Streets. Bowling Green, 

843-8893, 843-3249 
Waller, Bobbie E., 309 Strathmore. Lexington. 299-6123, 

299-6123 
Wanchic, Nicholas, 1511 Forbes Road. Lexington. 256-1233, 

265-6812 
Warren. Bige Reynold. Walker, 642-2224 
Warren, Buist "Buzz," 4043 Park Road. Fort Knox. 624-2098. 

624-1231 
Warren. Kenneth A., 46 Meadow View Drive. Louisville. 

464-5001. 634-1551. ext. 260 
Washi'leski, Tom, 3914 DelSi, Fay, Louisville, 964-6920. 

361-1256 
Washer, James P.. 4119 Sunflower. Louisville. 447-6817. 969-2391 
Washer. Stan, 3205 Huberta Drive. Louisville. 447-3078. 774-2341 
Watts. Shirley. 228 St. Ann. Lexington. 266-1749. 264-4017 
Weaver, Clyde Ivan, P. O. Box 254, Williamson. W. Va. 
Weaver, Ray. 3117 Bernard Drive. Fort Mitchell. 341-2610. 

341-8066 
Webb, Keaton. P. O. Box 73. Atwood, Tenn., 662-2067 
Webb. Ralph Dudley. 1646 Maywick. Lexington. 278-2904. 

278-2904 
Weber. Thomas C. 3707 St. Germaine. Louisville, 896-4298 
Webner, J. Randall, 607 Wallace Ave.. Louisville. 895-5036, 

969-9363 
Werkowitz. Jack. 4614 Miller, Blue Ash, Ohio, 791-5382 
Wheeler. Mellington A., 1019 Poplar St.. Kenova. W. Va. 
Whittemore. Paul F.. 2153A Swift Road. Fort Bliss. Texas 
Wickham. James R.. Jr.. 311 Cathedral Manor, Bardstown, 

348-5282, 833-4611 
Wilbert. Donald A., 3904 Tuesday Way, Louisville. 969-8733, 

448-2761. ext. 222 
Wilbert, Louis, 3504 Terrier Lane, Louisville, 458-4092, 368-2559 
Willey, Harold L.. 2214 Inwood Drive. Huntington, W. Va. 
Williams, James H., Elmwood Drive. South Shore. 932-4372, 

363-7440 
Willis, Donald A.. P. O. Box 5. Allen, 874-2485, 28.5-3407 
Willis. Jim, P. O. Box 1332, Logan, W. Va. 
Wilson. John Pope, 812 E. Main St.. Louisville, 586-4591, 

245-4121 
Wilson. Louis O.. 728 Wellington Way. Lexington. 277-6374, 

252-7685 
Wise, Billy V.. 240 St. Ann Drive, Lexington, 266-7449. 264-4017 
Wise. Jack, 209 Pocahontas, Georgetown. 863-3948. 863-1393 
Witskcn. Roger L., 4321 St. Dominic. Cincinnati. Ohio. 471-6312, 

421-6100 
Wray, Robert F., 29 Belle Monte, Fort Mitchell. 341-1778, 

431-3200, ext. 76 
Wright, James L., 121 Showalter Drive. Georgetown. 863-3628. 

233-2000. ext. 3280 
Wulfeck, James Andrew. Jr.. Ill Burdsall Ave.. Fort Mitchell. 

331-3599, 341-5800 
Wurtz, Emil, 18 E. Fourth St.. Cincinnati. Ohio. 471-0526, 

381-1232 
Yanity, Joseph, 42 Utah Place. Athens. Ohio. 693-6464. 593-7771 
Yates, William H.. 324 Eastin Road. Lexington. 299-2473, Rich- 
mond 623-3424 
Yost, Carl, P. O. Box 421, Brandenburg, 422-2661, 422-2101 
Young, Jack. 121 Smith Ballard, Richmond, 623-4589, 623-2334 
Zaranka, Benny J.. 165 St. William Drive. Lexington. 266-6435, 

265-6666 
Zehnder, Mel, 6889 Green Meadow Circle. Louisville. 893-2071 
Zimmer, Thomas, 114 Summit Drive, Fort Mitchell. 341-4566 
ZlamaJ. Raymond K., 541 Johnson Ave.. Lynch. 848-6966 



AS WE BEGIN OUR SIXTEENTH YEAR OF 
PROVIDING STUDENT AND ATHLETIC IN- 
SURANCE COVERAGE AND SERVICE TO 
KENTUCKY SCHOOLS, WE WANT TO EX- 
PRESS OUR THANKS TO YOU, OUR VALUED 
CUSTOMERS, AND WISH YOU A SUCCESS- 
FUL SCHOOL YEAR. WE APPRECIATE 
YOUR CONFIDENCE AND THE FINE JOB 
YOU ARE DOING FOR THE CHILDREN OF 
OUR STATE. KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK! 



^Ue> KiH4^de4t Qo4nfia4Uf> 



GENERAL AGENT 



W. E. KINGSLEY J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. CHARLES C. PRICE 

Life Department 

121-123 LAFAYETTE AVENUE LEXINGTON, KY. 40502 PHONE 254-4095 

P. O. BOX 7100 



50 YEARS 
FOR ATHLETES 

In August, 1918, our founder, Bill Hunt, was asked to help secure some 
uniforms for a football team so they could tell the spectators from the 
players. 

For 50 years we at Hunt's have tried to serve the athletes by finding for 
them the best available equipment to serve their needs. 

Today we feature and can supply immediate delivery on merchandise for 
any athletic or physical education need from our warehouse. 

We have complete stock of the following items. 

Football Shoes sizes 1 to 14 

Basketball Shoes sizes 1 to 17 

Football Pants sizes 22 to 52 

Football Jerseys sizes 4 to 50 

Football Shoulder Pads sizes Little League to 50 

Basketball Jerseys sizes 10 to 50 

Basketball Pants sizes Little League to College 

Athletic Socks oizes 6 to 16 

Football Helmets sizes Boys Extra Small to 8 

Football — Rubber or Leather — Little League to Pro 

Basketballs — Indoor or Outdoor — Biddy to Pro 

Fair Play Scoreboards — Grade School to College 

First Aid for prevention or treatment 

We specialize in your problems. 

Next day delivery to any school in Kentucky. 

Call on our experience and service with your problems. 

In Mayfield, 247-1941 COLLECT, or Louisville 459-6366. 

One of us can help you. i^ 

C. A. BYRN, Jr. — ROY BOYD — JIM MITCHELL 

WADE BURLESON — BILLIE FARMER — JENNY SIMPSON 

ELIZABETH RULE — NANNY LOU USERY — SONDRA POTTS 

HENRY BOMAR 



HUNTS ATHLETIC GOODS CO., Inc. 

CH 7-1941 — PHONES — CH 7-1942 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 




^he i^po^tsmans LAeed 



The Player . . . 



1. He lives clean and plays hard. He plays for the love of the game. 

2. He wins without boasting, he loses without excuses and he never 
quits. 

3. He respects officials and accepts their decisions without question. 

4. He never forgets that he represents his school. 

The Coach ... 

1. He inspires in his boys a love for the game and the desire to win. 

2. He teaches them that it is better to lose fairly than to win unfairly. 

3. He leads players and spectators to respect officials by setting them a 
good example. 

4. He is the type man he wants his boys to be. 

The Official . . . 

1. He knows the rules. 

2. He is fair and firm in all decisions. He calls them as he sees them. 

3. He treats players and coaches courteously and demands the same 
treatment for himself. 

4. He knows the game is for the boys, and lets them have the spotlight. 



The Spectator . . . 



1. He never boos a player or official. 

2. He appreciates a good play, no matter who makes it. 

3. H« knows the school gets the blame or the praise for his conduct. 

4. He recognizes the need for more sportsmen and fewer "sports." 



Official Organ of the 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

October, 1968 



K.H.S.A.A. Football Schools 

(Asterisks Indicate 8 man Football Schools) 

Schooi Address Coach 



Allen County 

Anderson 

Atherton 

Bardstown 

Bath County 

Beechwood 

Belfry 

Bell County 

Bellevue 

Rerea Community 

Bishop David 

Boone County 

Bourbon County 

Bowling Geeen 

Boyd County 

Boyle County 

Breckinridge County 

Bryan Station 

Burgin 

Butler 

Butler County 

Caldwell County 

Campbell County 

Campbellsville 

Carroll County 

Catlettsburg 

Caverna 

Central 

Christian County 

Corbin 

Covington Catholic 

Crittenden County 

Cumberland 

Cumberland County 

Danville 
Daviess County 
Dayton 
De Sales 
Dixie Heights 
duPont Manual 
Durrett 

Eastern 
Elizabethtown 
Elkhorn City 
Eminence 
Evarts 

Fairdale 

Fern Creek 

Flaget 

Fleming County 

Fleming-Neon 

Fort Knox 

Fort Campbell 

Frankfort 

Franklin County 

Franklin-Simpson 

Fulton 

Fulton County 

Gamaliel* 
Garrard County 
George Rogers Clark 
Georgetown 
Glasgow 
Gx'eensburg 

Harlan 

Harrison County 

Harrodsburg 

Hazard 

Hazel Green 

Henderson 

Henderson County 

Henry Clay 

HeniT County 

Highlands 

Hiseville* 

Holmes 

Hopkinsvllle 

Iroquois 

James A. Cawood 
Jeffersontown 
Jenkins 

Jessamine County 
Johns Creek 



Scottsville 

Lawrenceburg 

Louisville 

Bardstown 

Owingsville 

Fort Mitchell 

Belfry 

Pineville 

Bellevue 

Berea 

Louisville 

Florence 

Paris 

Bowling Green 

Route 2, Ashland 

Danville 

Harned 

Lexington 

Burgin 

Louisville 

Morgantown 

Princeton 

Alexandria 

Campbellsville 

Carrollton 

Catlettsburg 

Horse Cave 

Louisville 

Hopkinsville 

Corb'n 

Covington 

Marion 

Cumberland 

Burkesville 

Danville 

Owensboro 

Dayton 

Louisville 

Fort Mitchell 

Louisville 

Louisville 

Louisville 
Elizabethtown 
Elkhorn City 
Eminence 
Evarts 

Fairdale 

Fern Creek 

Louisville 

Flemingsburg 

Fleming 

Fort Knox 

Fort Campbell 

Frankfort 

Frankfort 

Franklin 

Fulton 

Hickman 

Gamaliel 

Lancaster 

Winchester 

Georgetown 

Glasgow 

Greensburg 

Harlan 

Cynthiana 

Harrodsburg 

Hazard 

East Bernstadt 

Henderson 

Henderson 

Lexington 

New Castle 

Fort Thomas 

Hiseville 

Covington 

Hopkinsville 

Louisville 

Harlan 

Jeffersontown 

Jenkins 

Nicholasville 

Pikeville 



Ky. Military Inst. Lyndon 
Ky. School for Deaf Danville 
Knox Central Barbour ville 



Jim Meyer 
Ray Hager 
Jack Kleier 

Garnis Martin 
Bill Baldridge 
Roger Walz 
Albert Vipperman 
Timothy Sowders 
Richard Powell 
Dick Cruciotti 
Denny Nash 
Jack Turner 
Chester Greynolds 
Jody Ellis 
Tom Scott 
Jim Greer 
Stan Napper 
Dan Haley 
Gilbert Shely, Jr. 
Elmer CoUina 
Don Smith 

Fred R. Clayton 
Bob Miller 
Carl Pike 
Ron Menne 
Jerry Klaiber 
Jerome Ramsey 
John R. Rhodes 
Vic Waggoner 
John Warfield 
Tony Lanham 
Frank Parker 
Kenneth Green 
Roy Petett 

Pat Dale 
Waymond Morris 
Raymond King 
Tom Ososkie 
Charles Fugitt 
Charles Bentley 
William C. Wyatt 

John Young 
Vince Hancock 
Jack Hall 
Woody Barwick 
Charles Hunter 

Garland Miller 
Ed Orick 
Norman Mackin 
Ben Pumphrey 
Paul Stewart 
Bobby Westmoreland 
Marshall Patterson 
O. C. Leathers 
Sonny Adkins 
Clarkie Mayfield 
Larry Shanks 
D. J. Moore 

Jerome Taylor 
Coy Dyehouse 
Lloyd Hodge 
Jerry Green wald 
Lawrence Gilbert 
Coy Pigman 

Dan Beasley 
Bill McKee 
Harold Wood 
Newt Green 
Hughes Bennett 
William Dawson 
Pascal Benson 
Andy Honkina 
Harry Rief 
Mike Murphy 
P'-q W"'lon 
Bob White 
Fleming Thornton 

Dave Fry rear 

Wendall Wheeler 
James Hughee 
Tom Brush 
Elmer Stephenson 
John O'Brien 

Dudley Berthold 
James Morrison 
Charles D. Black 



Layfayette 

LaRue County 

Lebanon 

Leslie County 

Lewis County 

Lily 

Lloyd 

London 

Lone Oak 

Louisa 

L'ville Country Day 

Louisville Male 

Ludlow 

Lynch 

Lynn Camp 

McKell 

Madisonville 

Mayfield 

Mays ville 

M. C. Napier 

Madison 

Madison Central 

Meade County 

Mercer 

Met-'alfe County 

Middlesboro 

Millersburg Mil. Inst. 

Montgomery County 

Morgan County 

Mt. Sterling 

Mt. Vernon 

Mullins 

Murray 

Newport 

N'ewport Catholic 
Nicholas County 
North Hardin 
North Marshall 
North Warren 



Lexington 

Hodgenville 

Lebanon 

Hyden 

Vanceburg 

Lily 

Erlanger 

London 

Paducah 

Louisa 

Louisville 

Louisville 

Ludlow 

Lynch 

Corbin 

South Shore 

Madisonville 

Mayfield 

Maysville 

Hazard 

Richmond 

Richmond 

Brandenburg 

Harrodsburg 

Edmonton 

Middlesboro 

Millersburg 

Mt. Sterling 

West Liberty 

Mt. Sterling 

Mt. Vernon 

Pikeville 

Murray 

Newport 
Newport 
Carlisle 
Vine Grove 
Calvert City 
Smiths Grove 



Ohio County Hartford 

Old Kentucky Home Bardstown 
Oldham County LaGrange 

Owen County Owenton 

Owensboro Owensboro 

Owensboro Catholic Owensboro 



Paducah Tilghman 

Paintsville 

Paris 

Park City* 

Paul G. Blazer 

Pikeville 

Pineville 

Pleasure Ridge Park 

Prestonsburg 

Raceland 

Rowan County 

Russell 

Russell County 

Russellville 

St. Xav"?r 

Sayre 

Scott County 

Seneca 

Shawnee 

Shelby County 

Shelbyville 

Shepherdsville 

Simon Kenton 

Somerset 

Southern 

Stanford 

Tates Creek 
Temple Hill* 
Thomas Jefferson 
Todd Central 
Tompkinsville 
Trigg County 
Trinity 

Union County 

Valley 
Virgie 

Waggener 
Warren County 
Washington County 
Wayne County 
Western 
Westport 
Wheelwright 
Whitesburg 
Whitley County 
Williamsburg 
Woodford County 
Wurtland 



Paducah 

Paintsville 

Paris 

Park City 

Ashland 

Pikeville 

Pineville 

Louisville 

Prestonsburg 

Raceland 

Morehead 

Russell 

Russell Springs 

Russellville 

Louisville 

Lexington 

Georgetown 

Louisville 

Louisville 

Shelbyville 

Shelbyville 

Shepherdsville 

Independence 

Somerset 

Louisville 

Stanford 

Lexington 

Glasgow 

Louisville 

Elkton 

Tompkinsville 

Cadiz 

Louisville 

Morganfield 

Valley Station 
Virgie 

Louisville 

Bowling Green 

Springfield 

Monticello 

Louisville 

Louisville 

Wheelwright 

Whitesburg 

Williamsburg 

Williamsburg 

Versailles 

Wurtland 



Virgil Chambers 
Ollie Howard 
Tom Simpson 
Floyd Hines 
Nick Diachenko 
Roy Cochran 
Roy Lucas 
Mike Rhode 
Charles Akers 
Bob Prichard 
Dudley Hoffman 
John Conn 
Steve Kiefer 
Ed Miracle 
Robert Igo 

Jim Hastings 
Dennis Sexton 
Virgil Rains 
Tom Becherer 
Charles Hall 
Melvin Chandler 
To:ti Sims 
Wilson Sears 
Amos Black 
Harold Chambers 
Rill Cricillis 
Eugene Correll 
Clayton Taylor 
Ron McGuire 
Chailes Ishmael 
Lawrence Travis 
Joe Steele 
Preston Holland 

Al Neville 
Bob Schneider 
Jack Massie 
Wiiiard Rice 
Dave Holt 
Ralph Baker 

Richaid Berry 
Joe K. Jaggers 
Paul Finneseth 
David Hood 
Gerald Poynter 
Terry Clark 

Ralph Colby 
Walter Brugh 
Bernard Correll 
Blbridge Oliphant 
Herb Conley 
H-ni Lockhart 
William Adams 
Bob Williams 
George McClellan 

Charles Sammons 
Paul Owsley 
Heulyn Bishop 
W. S. Wilmoth 
Clarence Baker 

John MeihauB 
Gerald Walton 
Bill Wilson 
Ron Cain 
Lee Murray 
Gene Foster 
Richard Greenwell 
Henry Powell 
James Jenkins 
Jarrell Johns 
Henderson Wilson 
William Ed Leedy 

Roy Walton 
Jim Faulkner 
James Gray 
Michael Mace 
Frank Petett 
Ken Barrett 
James Kennedy 

Roy Hina 

Irv Spencer 
James Clay 

John Stoll 
Jim Morton 
Charles Kolasa 
Billy Jewell 
Preston Young 
Earl E. Browning 
Wilbur JamersoH 
Walter Thomai 
Don Rains 
Mickey Bowden 
John Snowden 
Bill Robinson 



3726 Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXXI— No. 3 



OCTOBER, 1968 



51.00 Per Year 



Early Season Football Questions 

coverage which previously applied the principle to tihe 
administration of penalties resulting from: (a) a foul 
before or after a touchdown; (b) a foul during or after 
a try-for-paint ; and (c) a live ball foul occurring after 
a change of possession and which was followed by a 
dead ball foul by the opponents. The rule has been 
expanded to now cover the situation which involves a 
foul during a live ball followed by an opponent's foul 
after the ball has become dead. In these cases, both the 
live ball and dead ball fouls must be considered totally 
separate from each other. The decision of acceptance 
or declination for the first penalty must not be affected 
by the second foul. Decisions must be made in the order 
of foul occurrence. Attempts to associate the penalties 
cannot be justified. The philosophy upon which the auto- 
matic principle is based, is that the penalty for the 
first foul (live ball) is either accepted or declined before 
the dead ball foul occurred. Hence, there must be no 
attempt to relate the two fouls in administration of 
their penalties. In general, the following six factors 
must be noted by the referee (to the same extent the 
offended captain would consider them) in making a 
determination as to whether it is most advantageous 
for <the offended team to accept or to decline the penalty 
for the live ball foul. These criteria, listed in the usual 
order of consideration, are as follows: (II Is a score 
involved? (2) What is the score of the game? (3) Does 
acceptance or declination of the penalty affect posses- 
sion of the ball? (4) Does acceptance or declination of 
the penalty involve a 1st down? (5) What is the time 
remaining to be played in the game? and (6) Does the 
wind have a bearing on the decision? 

For example, a situation Which requires the consid- 
eration of the foregoing criteria is as follows: Play: 4th 
and 7 with only 30 seconds playing time remaining and 
team K leading by 8 points. A strong wind is at the back 
of team R. R has a good forward passer. The ball is 
snapped from K's 5. K2 holds in the end zone. Rl catches 
the punt and advances across the goal line of K. Con- 
sideration: The automatic provision is in effect because 
the foul by K was before a touchdown. If the penalty 
were declined for the holding by K2, the score, provid- 
ing the point after touch<Sc>wn were successful, would 
be K8, R7. K would then have the choice of kicking off 
or receiving and undoubtedly would receive, thereby 
greatly reducing the possibility of R's regaining the ball 
in the 30 seconds remaining. If R accepted the penalty, 
it would result in a safety, making the score 8-2 in K's 
favor. K would be required to free-kick from its 20 
yardline into a strong wind, thereby giving R the ball 
with a fair opportunity to score and win the game in 
the approximately 30 seconds remaining. 



EDITOR'S NOTE: These interprerations of the 1968 
National Alliance Football Rules do not set aside nor 
modify any rule. They are made and published by the 
National Federation of State High School Athletic 
Associations in response to situations presented. 

1968 FOOTBALL PUBLICATIONS CORRECTIONS 
CASE BOOK: 

Page 5-3. Play— Strike the sentence: "The offending 
team shall be penahzed 15 yards." 

Page 11-20. Play— Change the last word from "play" 
to "flight." 
SIMPLIFIED AND ILLUSTRATED: 

Page 3 (top) — Delete caption. Center is in legal posi- 
tion. 

Page 9 (top) — Strike the words "False start." 

Page 35 (top) — ^Revise caption to read: "The ball 
became dead When it touched anything in the end zone. 
The foul by No. 12 is for contacting an opponent eifter the 
down has ended." 

Page 56 (top) — Change the caption to read: "Double 
foul 'and the piling on is penalized. The down will be 
replayed and A wiU be penalized 15 yards from the 
previous spot." 

Page 128 (bottom)— Item 1, Change the word "de- 
fense" to "offense." 
IMEETING FOLDER: 

Page 6 — Item I in second column should read: "No 
foul causes the ball to become dead." 

Page 10, second colunrn — The last sentence in Item 7 
should read: "An ineligible is prohibited from touch- 
ing . . ." 



1. Play: 1st and 10 on the 50 yardline. Al is offside. 
Team A's forward pass in intercepted by Bl on B's 35 
yardline. Bl advances the baU to the 20 yardline of 
team A, where he is tackled. Bl crawls. 

Ruling: The penalty for the offside by Al is auto- 
matically declined. The penalty for crawling by B is 
automatically accepted by team A. The crawling by Bl 
is a dead ball foul. Thus the ball will belong to team B 
on the 25 yardline of A, where it will be 1st down, 15 
yards to go. 

2. Play: 1st and 10 on the 50 yardline. Bl is offside. 
Team A's forward pass is intercepted by Bl on the 35 
yardline of B. Bl advances to the 20 yardline of team 
A, where he is tackled. A2 piles on. 

Ruling: The penalty for the offside by Bl is automati- 
cally accepted by team A. Measurement is from the 
previous spot and places the ball on the 45 yardline of 
team B. "The penalty for the piling on by A2 is also 
automatically accepted and is measured from the 45 
yardline of A, 15 yards, which will place the ball on the 
40 yardline of team A, 1st and 20 yards to go for A. 

Comment: The principle of automatic penalty ac- 
ceptance and declination is based entirely on the phi- 
losopihy of providing the maximum advantage to the 
offended' team. This year's rules change merely extends 



3. Play: Representatives of visiting team B request 
permission to use the top of the press box as a vantage 
point for filming the game. Tiiis courtesy has been 
granted them in the past, but they are denied thi^ on the 

(Continued on Page Five) 



Page Two THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1968 

OCTOBER, 1968 VOL. XXXI— No. 3 Florence, Robert H. Nord, Gilbert 
— — - — ; ; — - — : — ; Flynn, Bobby Omer, Harold G. 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky TTnrtnPV Rnhprt T Oshnrnp Tpri 

High School Athletic Association J^ortney, KODert L,. USOOrne, lea 

Office of Publication. Lexington, Ky. 40501 Foster, J. W. Parker, Bob L. 

Second class postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky. Fpalpv 'Rill "Parcloi/ n-t7rIo 'W 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 1, ,V. .: . i-aisiey v^iyoe £.. 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD Franklin, James A. Peeno, Harry R. 

Lexington, Ky. Frazer, Tom Roe Raque, Ron 

BOARD OF CONTROL Garrett, Richard A. Ray, Bob 

President Preston Holland (1905-69), Murray Gour, Bob Reddington. Jim 

Vice-President Ralph C. Dorsey (1966-70), Horse Cave (^ranp Charlp'^ K Rpppp FrpH "Rnpk" 

Directors— Alvin Almond (1967-71), Bowling Green; Morton iJidLe, (^Udlies, r^. neece, !< rea ^OLK 

Combs (1968-72). Carr Creek: Don Davis (1967-71). Independ- Grace, H. t., Jr. Reed, Goraon Moe 

ence: James T. Dotson (1968-72), Johns Creek; Don R. Rawlings Graham JameS RiSES William T 

(1965-69), Danville; Foster J. Sanders (1966-70). Louisville. rT„rlHpn ' NpwpH RiSS'Rni 

Subscription Rate $1.00 per Year Haoaen, INCWeU King, HAi 

Hagan, Joseph E. Russell, Gary E. 

^-^ . ^ J /SMIL) Hagerman, Bart Sapp, Edward 

zJt^iom the Commissione>i s Office "^l'- ^'^^^a':^ ,,^ Sdhmitt, Paui e. 

'■' Hedge, David Wm. Sohuble, Charles 

Heinze, Frank Scott, W. L. "Bill" 

Employment Bureaus Heinze. John G. Seale, William E. 

Sixteen employment bureaus for officials have been ^^^^^' ^^^ ^- Shanks Thomas E. 

established. Each registered official should file at once Jenfcns, Kean Shaw, John H 

with his nearest bureau head his schedule of games and ^J^^'^'h '^f™'"'^ Showalter, John 

list of dates on which the official will be available to p^^;,' ^- ^eUis ,Sloan, Wallace 

call games. The names of the bureau heads, with the i^^™°'^'^',^- .jf.^" „ ^ Maten, Joe 

residence and business phone numbers (residence num- f^^^ip' S^iUiam E., Jr. Stephens(>n Harry 

bers given first), are as follows: ^^^^^ ^^1, ^ ^-^r""' ^'"'""^ °- 

Rex Alexander, 1320 Wells Blvd., Murray, 753-3579, ^T^'^^''™^ ^- ^ulbvan^ Don C. 

Yg9 g3gg Lotz, Robert W. Swinford, John 

"Charlie Irwin, Route 1, Hopkinsville, TU 6-4820, TU ^"^J?^; George Thompson, Jack F., Jr. 

g^§20 t- . . McGehee, Gordon Varner, Ray 

Jerry Kinimel, Beechmont, 476-2656, 476-2656 ^'^^uuX^''''^ '^- Vissman, Charles F. 

Bob Gour, 218 S. Lee, Bowling Green, 843-9582, ^cNabb, Edgar Wagner, Jim 

842 0316 , b , , jyjjjy^ g -Q jj. Waide, Harry D. 

Howard Gardner. 529 McCullum. Elizabe«own, Mayhevv^ Wm M. Walker, Paul R. 

765-6273 Mayo, Henry L. Waller, Bobbie E. 

aaude Ricketts, 1.506 Larchmont, Louisville, 635-6536, ^'^'^'^!'^' ^^'''^'^ ^- Wanchic, Nick 

634-1551 Mercker, George E. Warren, Kenneth A. 

Hubert Louden, 4815 Red Start Road, LouisviUe, ^J^^f^^"; P°" Z''t''\3^T^% 

964 '639 584-4141 Minta, John H. Watts, Shirley R. 

Bob Mmer. 197 Holiday Lane, Fort Thomas, 441-5885, ^^^'^J' \^{. , Wilson Louis 

635 2191 Moraica, Wiluam A. Wise, BiUy V. 

Roy Winchester, Bethlehem, 878-4102 (PleasureviUe), ^f^'",'"^^' '^'^''"^ ,^'^^' ^^""^ ^ ^ 

346-8761 (New Castle) Neal, Gene Wray, Robert F. 

Howard Rogers, 17 Maiyland Ave., Winchester, 744- ^°^f\ °°"S Zmimer, Tom 

1785, 299-1221 ext. 4152 (Lexington) ^"""^^ Bertrand J. 

254^^7"^'''' ''' ^' ^ '*•' '^™"^''"' '''"''''• Approved Football Officials 

Bob Foster, Science Hill, 423-3313, 678-8161 Allison, Roy Jacoby, Ben 

BiUy Joe GoltJen, 436 E. Main St., Lynch, 848-2512 Clemmons, Sam Kaufman, Alvin R. 

Goebel Ritter, 415 CorneUa Ave., Whitesburg, 633- Collins, Ronald K. McCoy, Larry 

7164, 6334455 Cook, Richard Maloney, Ross H. 

E. B. May, Jr., P. O. Box 45, Prestonsburg, 686-3414, Crider, Ray Mattingly, Charles 

886-8661 Dent, Donald L. Morse, Richard K. 

Ernie Chattin, 2147 Central, Ashland, 324-2665, 324-6191 Denton. WiUiam J. Oldham, Ben 

' — Dentenber, Gene H. Reece, Jerry 

Certified Football Officials Devine, Edward J. Reeves, Bob 

„ ,, „, r^ T, ,. -i T Drake, Riohar(J Ray Riggs, C. Dennis 

Bell, Clarence T. Cowan, Robert L. „ , ' ^ . „ •^ d / t u 

Blanton, Homer Craft, Albert B. Frankel, Loms S. Rodgers, Tom H. 

Bordy, Philip Craft, Bill Fryrear, Wm. P. Russman, Godfrey F., Jr. 

Boyles, Jerry F. Cullen, Charles E. Gentry, Dale J. Sammons, Terry L. 

Brizendine, Vic Gulp, Willard E. Gettler, John F. Shaughnessy, Bernard E. 

Z^'ubT'"'' mCan, Sies W. Hammock, Don L. Shewmaker, Wayne 

Brown, Herman Davis, W. Cui-tis Hancock, Norb Talbot, Wm. G., in 

Brown, John W. "Scoop" Denton, Charles Harrison, William H. Thomas, Bill 

Bullock, Ted Durkin, Jack H. Harsh, Ronald B. Thompson, Tom D. 

Burke, Hariy R. Elliott, Carroll L. Horsman, Bill Washer, James 

Burton, John Elovitz, Carl ' . ^u o 

Canady, Ray Blair Faust, Jack Houdim, Thomas L. Weber, Thomas C. 

Canter, John Fish, Leland G. Hughes, Paul P. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1968 



Page Three 



Cross Country Assi^ments 

Cross Country regul^itions adopted by fhe Board of 
Control provide that Che state shall be divided into 
classes and regions by tihe Comnriissioner who will 
assign the schools to the reginoal sites. The 1968 assign- 
ments are as follows: 

Cross Country — Class AA 

Paducah Region — Christian County, Crittenden County, Hop- 
kinsville, Murray, Paducah Tilghman, Trigg County. 

Owensboro Region — Davieas County, Henderson County, Ow- 
ensboro. Providence. 

Bowling Green Region^BowlinK Green. Cub Run, Glasgow, 
Greensburg, Hart Central. North Warren, University. 

Clarkson Region— Caneyville, Clarkson, Elizabethtown, Flah- 
erty, Fort Knox. Leitchfield, Meade County. North Hardin, St. 
Romuald, West Hardin. 

Bardstown Region— Bardstown, LaRue County, Louisville 
Country Day. Portland Christian, Shelby County. Taylor 
County. 

Lexington Region — Bourbon County. Bryan Station, Frank- 
fort, Lafayette. Lexington Catholic, Lincoln School, Madison 
Central. Millersburg Military Institute. Tates Creek. 

Bellevue Region — Boone County. Covington Catholic, Dixie 
Heights, Highlands, Holmes Lloyd Memorial. Newport Catholic. 
Simon Kenton. 

Somerset Region — Danville. Knox Central, Lee County. Mon- 
ticello. Somerset, Pulaski County. Wayne County. W lliamsburg. 

Paintsville Region — Boyd County, Johnson Central, Johns 
Creek, Jenkins. Paul G. Blazer. 

Cross Country — Class AAA 

Flaget Region — Ahrens. Butler, Central. duPont Manual, 
Flaget, Male. Shawnee. 

DeSales Region — Atherton. DeSales, Durrett, St, Xavier. 
Southern . Thomas Jefferson . 

Iroquois Region — Bishop David, Fairdale, Iroquois, Pleasure 
Ridge Park, Val ley. Western. 

Waggener Region — Eastern. Fern Creek. Jeffersontown, Sen- 
eca, Trinity, Waggener, Westport. 



In Memoriam 



Correction 

In the September ATHLETE, the Madisonville High 
School was listed incorrectly in *he football classifica- 
tion as being in District 1, Region 1, of Qass AA. MaxJi- 
sonviUe High School is now in Ddstnict 2 of the same 
region and class. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 

REGISTERED FOOTBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled October 1) 

If one telephone number is ^ven for an official listed it is 
the home phone unless otherwise designated. If two numbers 
are fiven the first number is that of the home phone. 
Ahrens, Dou?, Anderson Hall. Georgetown, Louisville 425-3996. 

863-1208 
Bash Charles R., Ill D. St., Ceredo. W. Va. 

Bostie, Tim C. Route 2. Box 6, Salyersville, 349-2243, 349-2915 
Brotzge, Maurice J.. 3029 Real Branch Louisville, 893-7206, 

896-4461 
Brown. Bix, 1013 Darley Drive, Lexington 
Burnett, Duke, Route 3, Commanche Drive, Elizabethtown, 

766-6542, 765-6247 
Burton, John, 1316 Central. Ashland, 324-5964. 324-1111. ext. 5609 
Cecil, Don J., Route 1, Rineyville. 877-5877 

Chattin Ernie, 615 Seventeenth St., Ashland, 324-2665. 324-6191 
Clusky, Joe, P. O. Box 296, Red Jacket, W. Va. 
Cooper. Norris E., 218 Dean St., Bowling Green, 842-3619. 

842-8131 
Craft, Bill, 140 Vanderbilt Drive, Lexington, 277-4843 277-3737 
Gulp, Willard E.. 318 Skyline Parkway, Hopkinsville, 886-7967 
Davis Charlie, Loyal, 573-1640, 573-5027 
Delaney, William, 17 West Ridge Ave., Newport, 431-4410. 

771-6610 
Dierolf, Col. William H., Jr., Forest Drive Applewood Manor, 

Dallas. Pa., 675-5S3, 632-1056 
Dixie, C. P., 608 So. Clay Louisville, 683-2656. 366-9561, ext. 501 
Donald, Edward W., Co. C, 19th Maint., APO New York 
Duckworth, Johnny, 1430 Frederica Owensboro, 685-2206 
Durkin, Jack, 291 Burke Road, Lexington, 254-0146, 265-0716 
English, P. T. Box 217. Union City, Tenn., 885-5960, 885-1414 
Florence, Robert H., 308 N. 36th St., Paducah, 444-7489, 444-9691 
Gentry, William R., Jr. 108 Oakley Bldg.. Bardstown, 348-8903, 

348-3767 
Glass. K. L.. 108 Adkins St.. Clarksville. Tenn.. 648-2066, 

798-6791 
Goforth, Bob. Box 648, Loyall, 673-4666 
Graham. Ronald E.. Box 218. Lynch. 848-6446 
Griggs, John M.. 3045 Dartmouth, Lexington, 278-2422, 252-4471 
Guy. Newton S., Mound Street, Harlan 278-6679, 573-1598 
Hall. John R., 2610 Central Parkway, Ashland, 325-7806, 324-1111 




Alvin L. Almond 

Alvin L. ALmond, atihletic director and former coach 
at Western Kentucky University High School and a 
member of the Board of Control of the Kentucky High 
Sdhool Athletic Association, died in Bowling Green on 
August 31, 1%8. He was 41. 

Mr. Almond was a graduate of Bowling Green High 
School and Western Kentucky University. While at 
Western he served as manager of the Hilltoppers bas- 
ketball team. His career as coach and teacher began in 
1950, when he accepted a position at the Alvaton High 
School, where he remained until 1956. In that year he 
became supervising teacher of Physical Education. He 
coached basketball and baseball at College High, giving 
up coaching in these sports following the 1963-64 sdhool 
year in order to concentrate on his duties as athletic 
driector. He was currently listed in K.H.S.A.A. records 
as coach in goU and tennis. 

An active member of the Mt. Olivet Cumberland 
Presbyterian Church, Mr. Almond had served as Sunday 
School superintendent and teacher. He had been a mem- 
ber of the Bowling Green Optimist Qub for many 
years, and was active in working with the Bowling 
Green Boys Club, He had been a member of the 
K.H.S.A.A. Board of Control since July 1, 1967. 

Mr. Almond is survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
J. T. Almond of Bowling Green, and a brother, T. R. 
Almond of Louisville. 



Hamilton James E., Jr., 6910 Conn Drive, No. 1, Louisville. 

968-1201, 454-7511, ext. 3486 
Heaberlin, Gerald, 965 Greenup St., Catlettsburg. 739-6656 
Heinold, Thomas, 6702 Plantation Cincinnati, Ohio, 622-7834, 

861-3220 
Howard, Jasper B.. 1306 Glouchester. Middlesboro, 248-3388. 

337-3093 
Hubbard. John Douglas 215 W. Beall, Bardstown, 348-3067. 

348-8040 
Hughes, Robert E., 610 E. 8th St., Russellville, 726-6334, 726-6335 
Hunter, Thurman, Box 172 Pineville, 337-2321 /'Bus.) 
Johns, Charles R., Route 3, Fulton, 479-1819, 479-1819 
Jones, William L. 814 McCullum Ave., Elizabethtown, 765-6061, 

765-6247 
Karr, Don, 1503 Woodwind Court, Corbin. B28-6466, 528-6466 
Kratzenberg, Richard, 2535 So. 8th Ironton, Ohio 
Kratzenberg, Robert R.. 2420 So. 11th St., Ironton. Ohio 
Kuhl, Lawrence, Houser Lane London 

Laird, Ronald E., 607 Wells Ave., Fulton, 472-9044, 472-9000 
Lee, Charles J. 315 Scott Ave., Lexington, 265-5232, 254-2791 
Lowe. James Lawrence. 520 Brockton. Richmond 

(Continued on Page Six) 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1968 



The Flying Dutchman 

It is only a few days until liie Dutdhman starts his 
last series of clinics for the K.H.S.A.A. Since announc- 
ing his retirement from his post of rules interpreter, 
many wonderful letters have come from friends which 
make the "End of ithe Rainbow" very beautiful. 

Cliff Fagan wrote from Chicago, Ernie Chattin from 
Ashland, and Al Gustafson called from Louisville to say 
things wMch make the EKitchman's cup to run over. 
There's nothing which has the value of true friendship. 
So it is that the friends who have written or called from 
all over Kentucky make ithis writer a rich man. 

In the long run it's people doing things unselfishly 
for others who make life happier and easier, and 
Louisville's George E. Gans is one of those people. Over 
more than four decades George has been working for the 
improvement of his community and for progress. 

In the micJdle forties George Gans was a leader in 
bringing fine operettas to L^ouisville's Ampitheatre and 
more recently he has given his leadership and energy 
to bringing one of the naition's finest zoological gardens 
to Louisville. Because of his lifetime of unselfish serv- 
ice, George Gans is 'the winner of the Corn Cob Pipe of 
Honor for September. It couldn't be awarded to a finer 
gentleman. 

Perhaps your community is already using your 
school building for an indoor recreation center and the 
acreage on which it stands for a summer playground? 
Kentucky has a law which not only states that recrea- 
tion is a proper municipal purpose of all cities and 
counties, but also permits our Boards of Education to 
discharge their recreational responsibilities to the tax- 
payers. 

Recreation is a function of education. As far back as 
1948, the Peabody College Survey of 'the Jefferson County 
Educational System commended that Board of Educa- 
tion for its forward move in opening all school bmlddngs 
for recreational use alter sdiool hours — under profes- 
sional supervision. School buildings belong to the people 
and they have every right to their maximum usage. 
This practice means service to the public in the king- 
size package — educational and recreational facilities for 
one cost. 

For a long time the school building has occupied a 
strange position in too many of our communities. What 
other tax-supported building is used only partially for 
nine months and allowed to stand idle the.frther three? 
And, most of ithese unused facilities lie in the midst of 
communities badly in need of dubrooms, meeting 
plajces, recreation grounds and gymnasiums, all of 
which are available in school buildings. 

Education and recreation are co-functional. It is 
hard to tell where one starts and the other leaves off. 
An educational activity iJuring school hours may be- 
come recreational for the adult working men and wom- 
en at night. A boy is educated in manual arts in the 
shop during the day. His dad, who works at a desk all 
day, re-creates himself by building a chair in that same 
shop at night. The same principle appHes to other activ- 
ities. 

Our national leaders are greatly concerned about 
the physical fitness of our youth^and rightly so. Our 
boys and girls get a good start in a program of body 
building in school gymnasiums and on playgrounds 
While they are students. Is there sound logic for denying 
them the same facilities for continuing their physical 
fitness programs after graduation? 

A basketball coach once told me that gymnasiums 
exclusively are for the school teams. As taxpayers we 




George Gans 

have every rdight to reject this philosophy. Sudi practice 
constitutes less than maximum usage of a pubUc build- 
ing. As more homes are built, there is less open space 
for play. This demands complete usage of the schools' 
playgrounds. No community would be without a church 
or school. In the development of the whole child, no 
community can afford to be without facilities for rec- 
reation — ^and your community already has these in 
your school buildings. 

The old horizon has changed! As this new trend of 
thought presents itself on the new horizon, it will be 
accompanied by objections. Rarely will these objections 
come from the more progressive school leaders who 
have kept pace with the changing times. Usually, objec- 
tions to mul'tiple usage of the school buildings originate 
with those who would like for things to remain as they 
are. Our Changing time will not permit this. It demands 
that we gear oursdves to adjust to changing conditions- 
when the automobile replaced the horse and buggy, 
there were objections — but times were changing, and 
we changed with them. The result was progress. 



1968-69 Wrestling Rules Changes 

Rule 3, Section 1: Two 1-inch lines, 3 feet long and 
12 inches ai,art, shall be placed in the center of the 
drcle on the mat. 

Section 2a: Defines the specifications of the shirt 
requirements to comply with the illustration in the book. 

Section 2d: Requires the contestants to be clean 
shaven and well groomed. Indudes a xecommendation 
that long hair be discouraged in the interest of safety 
and good health habits. 

Section 3: Requires the use of headgear in all com- 
petition beginning with the 1969-70 season. 

Rule 4, Section 1. Provides for twelve mandatory 
wdghts as foUows: 95, 103, 112, 120, 127, 133, 138, 145, 
154, 165. 175, unlimited. Before a boy is permitted to 
wresUe in the unlimited cla^, he must weigh a mini- 
mum of 175 pounds. 

Section 2: Strongly recommended by the rules com- 
mittee that in<2vidual state assodations utUize an effec- 
tive weight control program which wUl involve the par- 
ents, family physidan, competitor and ooadi. 

Rule 6: Conduct of tournaments. Tnis section is re- 
written and rearrcuiged to indude tournament guidelines 
for those charged with the duties of administering tour- 
naments. Spedfic situations are covered in this section. 

Rule 7, Section 5: All consolation matches during 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1968 



Page Five 



interscholastic tournaments shall be 5 minutes in length, 
consisting of one 1-minute and two 2-minute periods. 

Rule 8, Section 1: The starting position on the mat 
has been revised. The new starting position of the offen- 
sive wrestler requires only one knee be on the mat. The 
new start is similar to the traditional position, but does 
give the offensive man more mobility. Pictures of the 
new position wUl be included in the 1969 edition of the 
rules book. 

Section 2: Provides that the use of time advantage 
will be optional (by state association adoption) during 
the 1968-69 season. 

Rule 9, Section 3: Includes a recommended tourna- 
ment scoring chart indica'lLng the point values given 
for scoring different places during tournaments. 

Rule 10, Section 2: Provides the penalty for flagrant 
unsportsmanlike conduct shall be removal from the 
premises for the duration of a dual meet or for a 
tournament session. 

Section 5: Stipulates that the time used in searching 
for contact lenses shall be coimted as part of the time 
allowed for injury. 

Section 7a: Whenever a defensive wrestler stands up 
while the offensive wrestler has a scissors hold, wres- 
tling wiU continue. The situation is considered poten 
tiaUy dangerous. 

Section 9d: Provides that the contestant in the advan- 
tage position on the mat shall make an honest attempt 
to wrestle aggressively in maintaining control and at- 
tempting to secure a fall. 

Rule 11: The penalty chart has been completely re- 
vised to indicate that penalties for all violations are 
acciunulative throughout the match. 

Rule 13, Section Ic: The officials' uniforms shall 
include black gym shoes. 

Interpretation: The procedure was adopted for recti- 
fying an incorrect start of the third period. It provides 
that all points earned or time advantage gained during 
the third period will be discounted. Following a 1-minute 
rest, the third period will be restarted correctly and the 
period win be wrestled in its entirety. The correction 
must be made prior to the contestants leaving the mat. 



In Memoriam 



FOOTBALL QUESTIONS 

(Continued from Page One) 

basis Uiat a movie camera constitutes a meohanical 
visual aid. 

Ruling: Rule 1-3-5 is not intended to restrict the 
privilege of taking movies during a ball game for show- 
mg after the game is completed. The restriction applies 
only to the use of video tape (or similar media) for the 
purpose of monitoring or replaying during the course of 
the game. The intermission is included as part of the 
restricted period. Taking movies, even through the use 
of video tape for the purpose of later showing for coach- 
ing or other purposes is not denied. 

4. Play: Specialized kicker Kl comes onto the field 
equipped with: (a) ballet slippers; )b) slipper socks; 
(c) heavy socks with laces inserted; or (d) tennis shoes 
cut so ithat protection is nU. 

Ruling: Illegal equipment in (a), (b), (c) and (d). 
The National Alliance football rules require that all 
players wear shoes. The definition of a shoe is that it 
shall be made of a material which covers the foot 
(c£mvas, leather or plastic) attached to a firm sole of 
leather, rubber, or composition materisd which may or 
may not have cleats. FYotection for the foot is required. 

5. Play: Rl signals for a fair catch and muffs the 
kick. As the ball is rolUng loose, he uses his hand or 





Russell E. Bridges 

Russell E. Bridges, 73, who served the Fort Thomas 
school system for thirty-four years and who was a mem- 
ber of the K.H.S.A.A. Board of Control during the 1937- 
47 period, died at the Baptist Home of Northern Ken- 
tucky, Newport, on September 17, 1968. 

A native of Kenton Coimty, Mr. Bridges had degrees 
from Eastern Kentucky University and the University 
of Kentucky. He itaught at Simon Kenton High School 
early in ihis career, later teaching and coaching football 
at the Highlands High School, Fort Thomas. He became 
assistant principal in 1927, principal in 1941, and super- 
intendent of schools dn 1943. He retired in June of 1956 
because of ill health. 

In 1937 Mr. Bridges was elected to membership on 
the Board of Control, a position which he filled with 
distinction. He was President of the Board during the 
1941-47 period. 

Mr. Bridges was a member of nimierous educational 
groups. He was a past president of the Kentucky Asso- 
ciation of School Administrators. He had taught a Sun- 
day School class at the First Baptist Church of Fort 
Thomas. He was a Charter member of the Fort Thomas 
Lions Club, and was active in many civic affairs. The 
Physical Education building at Highlands was named 
for him in 1955. 

Surviving Mr. Bridges are two brothers, Lloyd, De- 
Mossville, and Hobart, Momingview; a sister, Mrs. 
Blanche Hanker, Fort Thomas; four grandchildren, and 
two great-grandcbUdren. 

hands to push or puU Kl in an attempt to gain posses- 
sion of the loose ball. 

Ruling: Legal. Rl may attempt to gain possession 
of the loose ball. A player from either team may use 
his hands in an attempt to get to the loose ball. Thds 
action differs from a player who signals for a fair catch 
and subsequently blocks an opponent. 

6. Play: The kick-off by Kl from his 40: (a) goes 
out-of-bounds on R's 35 without having been touched; or 
(b) is touched by Rl on his 21 and then goes out-of- 
bounds; or (c) is touched by K2 on his 46 yardhne 
where it goes out-of-bounds; or (d) is touched by KS^on 
has 48 yardline and is recovered by R2 on K's 45. 

Ruling: In (a), the clock does not start, the ball 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1968 



belongs to R at the inbounds spot. In (b) the clock 
starts when the kick is touched by Rl and is stopped 
when the ball goes out-of-bounds. The ball will be put 
in play by R at the inboimds spot. In (c), the clock does 
not start. The ball will be awarded to R at the spot ol 
first touching and placed ready-for-play. In (d), the 
clock will not start when .the ball is first touched by 
K2, but it will be started when the kick is recovered 
by R2. 

7. Play: The kick-off by Kl from his 40 is first 
touched by K2 at his 48 and: (a) it is recovered by Rl 
but it is noted that R2 left the 5 yard zone before the 
ball was kicked; or (b) recovered and advanced by Rl, 
whose fumble was recovered and downed by K3. but 
during the advance by Rl, R2 chpped; or (c) K3 held 
and the kick is returned by R2, who advanced to K's 
40 where he fumbled and it is recovered by K3. 

Ruling: In (a), K would accept the penalty for illegal 
procedure by Rl which would be enforced from the spot 
of the kick and K would kick again from his 45. In (b), 
the rig'ht of R to take the ball at the spot of first 
touching was cancelled by the foul by R2. It would be 
K's ball at the spot of recovery. In (c), R could decline 
the penalty for the holding by K3 and take the ball at 
the spot of first touching on K's 48. 

Comment: When any member of the kicking team 
first touches a free-kick or scrimmage-kick, the receiv- 
ers may take the ball at the spot of first touc?hing or 
they may take the result of the play. R's right to take 
the ball at the spot of first touching is always cancelled 
if the penalty for any foul during the down is accepted 
or if, aifter first toudhing by the kickers, a memba- of 
the receiving team touches the kicked ball and there- 
after an R player commits a foul, regardless of whether 
the penalty is accepted or declined. It is not possible to 
enforce a penalty for a foul during the d'owTi and at the 
same time give 'the ball to the receiving team at the 
spot of first touching. If the penalty for a foul commit- 
ted during the down is declined, R may take the ball at 
the spot of first touching, or any other spot to which 
it is entitled', unless the foul is by a receiver after a 
member of the receiving team has touched the kick. 

8. Play: FoUowing a safety, a free-kick by Kl is 
first touched' by K2 at K's 28 yardline. It is recov- 
ered by Rl, who advEinces to K's 25 where he 
fumbles and the fumble is recovered and advanced by 
K3 to his 32. During the advance by Rl, R2 dipped. 

Rul'ing: The right of R to take the ball at the spot 
of first touching was cancelled when R2 chpped. K will 
dedine the penalty and retain possession of the ball at 
his 32. 

9. Play: During a pass which is completed behind 
the Hne, Interior lineman Al contacts Bl on the line-of- 
scrimmage and drives him 5 yards into the defensive 
secondary. 

Ruling: Legal. 

10. Play: During a pass which (a) is completed be- 
hind the line; or (b) crosses the Hne-of-scrimmage, an 
interior lineman (A6) charges through the neutral zone 
and contacts linebacker Bl, who is near but behind the 
defensive line-of-scrimmage at the time of the snap. 

Ruling: In (a) , the block is legal since the pass did 
not cross ithe line-of-scrimmage. In (b), it is pass inter- 
ference. 

11. Play: With 2nd and 4 from the 35 yardhne of 
A, Al is illegally in motion and Bl is offside. Ball car- 
rier A3 advances to his 45 where B2 poles on. 

Ruling: The illegal motion by Al and the offside by 
Bl combine to make a double foul and the down will be 
replayed. The penalties for both of these fouls offset 



each other. The penalty for the dead ball foul by B2 
wiU be administered from the succeeding spot, which 
is A's 35. This will result in a 1st and 10 for A at the 50. 

12. Play; Team A appears on the field ready for 
play with: (a) 6-inch numerals of contrasting color on 
the front of the jersey and 8-inch numerals on the back 
of the jersey; or (b) script numerals with a l-'inch-wide 
stroke of contrasting color; or (c) white Arabic block 
numerals shaded with green or gold jerseys; or (d) blue 
H^-inch stroke Arabic block numerals with a gold bor- 
der ol V2 inch on a blue jersey. 

Ruling: In (a), (b), (c), and (d), the numerals con- 
stitute illegal equipment. Before partidpating the play- 
ers must be equipped as prescribed by the rules. Nu- 
merals are required equipment and must be of a single 
color in contrast to the jersey color with ithe strokes 
about iy2 inches wide. They must be Arabic block 6 and 
10 inches high, front and back respectively. 

13. Play: With the ball on his 2 yardline, Al receives 
the snap with his foot touching the end hne. Bl was off- 
side. 

Ruling: If A accepts the penalty, A may put the bail 
in play from its 7 yardline. If A refuses the penalty, it 
is a safety. There is no automatic acceptance or decli- 
nation since there is ndther a touchdown, point after 
touchdown attempt, nor live and dead ball foul by 
opponents involved. 

14. Play: Kl punts and Rl partially blocks the kick. 
R2 does not touCh the ball but firmly contacts Kl. 

Ruling: If Rl partially blocked the kick near the 
kicker and R2 was near the kicker at the time the kick 
was touched, there would be no foul as the result of 
contact by R2, unless the contact was intentionally 
rough. 

Comment: The defense is obhgated to avoid the 
kicker whenever possible. In any situation, if the de- 
fense is to be excused for contacting the kicker as the 
result of touching the kick, the ball must be touched 
near the spot of the kick. No member of the defense 
can touch the ball in the line-of-scrimmage and then 
charge into the kicker an*, be exempt from the foul for 
roughness. Another guideline, the defensive player may 
not, even after the bcdl has been touched, stop and then 
renew 'his charge inip the kicker, nor may he change his 
direction after the baU lis touched' so he charges into the 
kicker. Touching the ball is, in itself, not a Mcense to 
charge the kicker. The rule governing this situation has 
been written so as not to penaHze the defensive player 
who has made an 'honest endeavor to block the kick and 
who has either succeeded or very nearly succeeded in 
doing so and finds himself in such a position that he 
cannot avoid the kicker as the result of his efforts. 
The rule does not specify that only the player who 
blocks the kick is excused from contacting the kicker, 
rather the rule states: "When the defense blocks . . ." 



FOOTBALL OFFICIALS 

(Continued from Page Three) 

McCamish, Dan L., Route 6. Locustwood Estates, Lexington 

264-2209. 258-9000, ext. 2B17 
McKinney. Adelle. 5th Fid. Hospital APO San Francisco 
McLauBhlin. Calvin, B653-B Corley, Fort Knox, 4-6B64. 4-7223 
Magruder, Earl C. 6911 Oakview Court, Louisville, 239-1015 
Mathis. Mike, 8447 Foxcroft Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio, 622-9010, 

562-6626 
Mayo, Henry L., Jr., B81 College St., Paintsville, 789-3157, 

789-4001 
Mitchell, Vyron W. P. O. Box 327, Fulton 
Moore, Franklin, 902 Walnut, Dayton, AX 1-6000. 221-4262 
Mounts. David G., 217 Marlene Drive, Evansville, Ind., 423-6930, 

423-7832 
Neal, Gene. Route 1, Batavia, Ohio 

Osting, Lawrence J., 1221 Bates Court, Louisville, 451-2070 
Peecher, W. Lloyd, 5928 Woodland Ave. Sciotoville, Ohio, 

776-6167, 776-6167 



THE KENTUC3CY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1968 



Page Seven 



Perkins, Ronnie L., Upton, 369-2439, 769-2311 
Pinson Eugene 3208 Hackworth St.. Ashland. 324-6,')48. 324-3101 
Powers'. Clark, P. O. Box 550, Baxter. 987-5513, 573-4683 
Quick, Russell V., 4215 Foreman Lane Louisville, 964-8061, 

637-4741 
Rawls, Townes, 

254-8862 
Redmon, Michael, 
Renfro, John E. 
Reynolds, Robert 
Roemele, Juett F.. 
Robinson. D. Blak 



1832 Darien Drive. Lexington, 278-4966, 



4409 So. Ridge Drive. Valley Station 
Box 298 WillianisburQT 54fl-3fi02 

C. Jr., 3332 Condit St., Ashland. 
, P. O. Box 244, Russellville. 726-9443 
, P. O. Box 2462, Pikeville. 432-3267 



937-8750 
549-0366 
325-2339 



Rudolph. Fred, Jr., 5600 Jeanine Drive, Louisville. 969-3019, 

635-7441, ext. 38 
Schutte. Joe. 1828 Appleton Lane. Louisville. 44R-7.'ifl5. 584-7' 36 
Sizemore. Aster, 29 Sunvalley Terrace, Hazard, 436-3402 

436-2107 
Snyder, Bernard L., 1263 E. Burnett Ave.. Louisville. 637-6989 
Stanley Paul J., Route 2, Box 33A, Proctorville, Ohio 
Stark. Dennis W.. 158 Ponnie Brae. Lexington. 252-2933 
Stuart. Joe G., II, 153 Pennsylvania Ave., Louisville, 897-1045, 

584-4221 
Sullivan, Thomas E., 6104 Woodhill Lane, Louisville. 969-2927. 

361-1256 
Taylor. Dennis H.. 1406 Hughes Murray, 753-4825, 753-5022 
Thigpen, Martin E., 163 Maple Drive, Hendersonville, Tenn., 

824-2711 
Thompson, Jack F. Jr., 1310 Rammers Ave., Louisville, 

634-3517, JU 4-6311 
Thompson, Thomas B., Route 2, Box 166, Belle Center, Ohio. 

464-3410 464-2751 
Thrasher, Phillip, 1105 Westwood Lane, Nevp Albany, Ind., 

944-3434, 944-2216 
Turner, Charles W., 6516 Jeanine Drive Louisville, 968-301J 
Whitt, Hobert E., Jr.. 168 Robin Road, Russell, 836-3676. 

836-4212 
Yarbrough Roy Dean. Jr., 2069 Fontaine Road, Lexington, 

266-3892, 258-9000, ext. 2617 



Registered Basketball Officials 
of the K.H.S. A.A — 1968 - 1969 



(List Compiled October 1) 



If the telephone nnmber is given for an official. It is the home 
phone nnmber unless otherwise designated. If two numbers are 
given, the first nnmber is that of the home phone. 

Adams, James C, Route 2, Box 39A, Nicholasville 886-3471 
Addington, David G., Route 3, Roman Meadows, Owensboro 

683-3987 
Akers. Curtis A., 277 High St., Pikeville, 432-1505 
Alderdice, Michael, Farthing Mayfield. 274-5054, 247-3610 
Alexander, Howard, Crittenden, 823-5621. 824-4325 
Alexander Rex E., 1320 Wells Blvd., Murray, 753-3679 762-6286 
Allen, James D.. P. O. Box 64. Martin, BU 5-3442 
Allen Thomas E., Route 1, Vine Grove, 828-3669 
Allen, Willard, Route 1, Box 32. Jackson. 666-2833 
Allender, Raymond L., Route 1 Coxs Creek 348-9386 
Allgood, Russell L.. Route 3. Elizabethown, 765-5361, 769-2311 
Aired Robert Damon, P. O. Box 68, Loyall, 673-1938 
Amos, Jerry, Route 2, Centra] City, 764-1990 
Anders, Raleigh A., Route 6, Box 73-A, London, 

628-1837 (Corbin) 
Anderson, George, 102 Third St., Manchester, 698-2719 
Anderson, Glenn S.. Jr.. Box 286, Prestonsburg 

886-3652 
Anderson, Luther, 

233-2000, ext. 



864-6217, 



B98-2778 
886-3929. 



Route 2, Liberty Heights, Carlisle, 289-2364, 
2548 
Arnold. Bill W., 3919 Tracy Ave.. Covington. 681-7420. 291-6030 
Ash, Robert C, 8316 Aspen, Pleasure Ridge Park, 937-8971 
Asher. Tony J. 807 Main, Sturgis, 333-2637, 389-1464 
Ayres, Terry E., East 8th St,. Manchester, 649-6635, Morehead 

784-9906 
Back, Phillip A., P. O. Box 155. Whitesburg. 633-7190. 855-4001 
Bailey, SGM. Frank. HHC USAREUR. APO New York 09102 
Baker, Ralph E., Smiths Grove, 563-2041 (Bus.) 
Baker Robert M.. Jr., 521 Barbee Way, Danville, 236-2092, 

236-2792 
Baldwin, Ron L., 2437 Madison, Covington, 581-4203 
Ballaban, Tom, 1103 Archland Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio 622-3024, 

761-7600 
Bankemper, Thomas. 317 E. 7th St.. Newport. B81-B047 
Barker Bob R., 2701 Jackson. Ashland, 324-6369, 324-9232 
Barker, Walter D.. P. O. Box 1411, Friendship. Ohio. 858-5064. 

353-0190 
Barnette, Jerry, Route 1, Box 456, Pikeville, 432-2328 
Bates. Bob. 1120 Meadow Lane, Portsmouth, Ohio, 354-2168, 

353-1161 
Beam Joseph F., Jr., First Street, New Haven, 649-3162 
Beasley, Danny, Route 1, Manchester. Ohio. 699-2734 
Beck, Robert E., 7530 Merlyn Circle. Louisville, 368-1966 
Beck, Ronald D., 118 Kennedy Ave.. Louisville. 896-4978 
Begley. Jack. 1602 Florence, Middletown. Ohio 



In Memoriam 




Charles R. Hord, Sr. 

Former Eastern High School football coaoh Charles 
R. Hord, Sr., died of a heart attack at his home in 
Louisville on August 26, 1968. He was 48. 

Mr. Hord, a World War II Army Air Corps veteran, 
went to Louisville in 1954 as an assistant coach at 
Atherton High School. He was a native of CampbeUs- 
ville, Kentucky, and had been a head coach at Lebanon, 
Kentucky, and Celina, Tennessee. He became Eastern's 
head football coach in 1961, which position he held for 
five seasons. His record during (that period was 34-13-1. 
His 1964 squad won the Class AAA County Region 
championship. 

In recent years Mr. Hord' had served the ocyunty 
schools as an administrative assistant in the division of 
pupil personnel and in administrative problems. 

Survivors include his widow, the former Jessae Boles, 
two sons, Alien Henry and Charles R. Hord, Jr.; and 
his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Hulet Herd of Greensburg, 
Kentucky. 



Bell, Clarence T., 3812 Meadow Haven Road, Louisville. 

239-0782, 682-6573 
Bell, Robert Jacob, 1580 Alexandria Drive, Lexington, 278-6736, 

299-1842 
Bennett, Gene, Van Dyke Avenue, Wheelersburg, Ohio, 574-2941, 

456-4191 
Benson, Shirley F., Route 3, Sturgis. 333-4047 
Benzinger, Joseph, Jr.. 3502 Behymer Road, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

752-3932. 742-2193 
Bergman, Harry W.. Jr., P. O. Box 691, South Shore, 932-4298, 

353-6869 
Bero. James. P. O. Box 968. Williamson. W. Va. 
Beth. Howard L.. Route 1. Gilbertsville. 362-8090 
Biddle. Robert Lane, 126 East 6th St., Maysville, 664-4674. 

564-3952 
Bingham. Bennie, P. O. Box 88. Worthington. 836-4208 
Bingham. Rodger W.. Violette Road, Crittenden, 824-2771 
Blackburn, Tennyson R.. P. O. Box 2157, Williamson, W. Va. 
Blackwood. Thomas. 3402. Hastings Cr., Louisville, 426-9760, 

682-1920 
Blair, Ivan, P. O. Box 11, Jeremiah, 633-7552, 633-2991 
Bleidt, John J., 3305 Thrush Road, Louisville, 634-0760 
Blevins, Boone, Jr., Staffordsville. 297-3336 
Blount, Richard E.. 329 Laurel. Hazard, 436-2874, 436-2044 
Bocook, Earl, 1102 Beech St., Kenova. W. Va. 
Bowling, Roy, Box 17. Fields Lane, London, 864-5006, 864-6240 
Boyd. Marcus F., 3130 Riggs Ave., Erlanger, 341-0219, 684-3273 
Branham, Larry G., Austin. 434-2867 " 

Brannon, William Russell, P. O. Box 3, Hyden. 672-2336 
Brashear. Loy Ray. Route 1, Glendale, 864-2921, 351-3147 
Brauch, Charles J.. 117 Westview Drive. Bardstown, 348-3218, 

348-3991, ext. 10 
Bray, Lonnie, P, O. Box 272, Hyden, 672-2274 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1968 



Breeden. Bill, P. O. Box 296. Mt. Washington, 538-4897, 564-3750 
Brennenstuhl, Jim, P. O. Box 269, Williamsburg, 549-2148 
Briscoe. Hubert, Route 3. Shelbyville, 633-4669. 633-2543 
Brizendine. Vic, 2711 Lakeside Drive, Louisville, 454-6843, 

689-9111 
Brock. Alben, Kettle Island, 337-3848 

Brock, John D., 1291/, Cherry, Pineville, 337-3512 (Bus.) 
Brock, John H., 228 Madison Ave., Richmond, 623-4S33. 623-4959 
Brown, Billy C, 105 Bluebird Ave.. Berea, 986-8235, 623-3541 
Brown, E. C, Liberty, 787-7275. 787-7191 
Browning, Earl E., 8715 Blossom Lane, Louisville, 425-2937. 

425-2541 
Browning, John T.. 1138 Mitchell St., Catlettsburg. 739-6416 
Brummett. Lloyd, 109 Portman, Stanford, 365-7862 
Bruner, Jack C. Route 5. Box 93. London, 864-4322. 864-2701 
Bugg, James. Route 2. Box 421. Hendei-son. 533-6347 
Buis. Nathaniel. Fair Street. Liberty, 787-6714. 787-6151 
Bunn. Harold, 2523i,l' Collis Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Bunnell. Rouaeau. P. O. Box 116. Hardyville. 528-2144 
Burch, B. W.. 2421 Adams St.. Ashland. 324-8397 
Burchett, Dwight. P. O. Box 406. Paintsville. 297-3158. 789-3881 
Burke, Harry R., 328 Arnold Ave., Prestonsburg. 886-2796. 

886-2385 
Burnutt, Duke, Route 3, Commanche Drive. Elizabethtown, 

765-6542, 765-6247 
Burkhart, James G., P. O. Box 169. Loyall. 673-1437. 664-3444 
Bush, Karmen B., 3642 Windward Way. Louisville, 485-5465 
Butcher, Douglas, P. O. Box 14. Meally. 789-5553 
Butler, Jack K., 2604 Fourth Ave.. Huntington. W. Va. 
Butler, Robert, 157 Whittier Drive, Owensboro, 684-7016, 

684-4226 
Butner, Billy M., P. O. Box 616, Lancaster, 792-3505. 925-2711 
Byars. Michael Kirk, 3531 Lansdowne Drive. Lexington. 

278-3530. 256-0802 
Cain. William R., 3040 Wedgewood. Louisville, 459-6837. 451-4330 
Caldwell, James A.. 162 Clover Ridge, Fort Thomas. 441-1626. 

397-4736 
Calitri, Don. Box 481, Union College, Barbourville. 546-3775, 

646-4151, ext. 133 
Callahan Thomas J., 4346 Ridgeview, Cincinnati. 471-0768, 

721-4787 
Campbell, George H., 116 Winchester, Middlesboro, 248-5882. 

248-5643 
Campbell, William. Jr.. Route 2. Manchester. 698-3472 
Canaday. Jacy Glenn. 603 Brown St., Vine Grove, 877-5537. 

877-6387 
Canady, Ray B.. Court Square. Barbourville. 646-4765. 646-3801 
Canter. John, 2826 Easter Blvd.. Louisville. 451-8218. 587-8862 
Cantrall. James R., 1810 Hounz Lane, Anchorage. 245-8760. 

682-5683 
Carlberg, John H., P. O. Box 234. Muldraugh. 942-2723. 

942-2730 
Carlberg. Ralph C, 1601 Elm, West Point, 922-4456 
Carr, Billy Wilson. 411 Longview Drive, Franklin. 586-6356 
Carr. John Leonard. 607 Chinn St.. Raceland. 836-8949 
Carson. Mike, 1044 Alta Vista. Louisville 
Cash. Charles C, 616 Hemlock. Calvert City, 395-4709 
Cassity. Gordon. Route 2, Box 136K, Catlettsburg. 739-6200. 

324-1111, ext. 8266 
Castle, Jack T.. Route 1. Box 305. Shelbiana, 432-3475, 764-8186 
Gates, Billy C, 130 Jacobs Drive, Princeton, 365-2585, 424-7741, 

ext. 682 
Cawood. Tommy L., Ivy Hill, Harlan. 673-2396. 573-3711 
Cecil. Donnie, Route 1, Rineyville. 877-5877, 4-7352 
Chattin. Ernie, 616 Seventeenth St.. Ashland. 324-2665. 324-6191 
Chambers, Virgil. 1809 Gayle. Lexington. 299-5962. 277-5122 
Cisco. Robert N., 403 Highland Ave.. Vine Grove. 877-5648. 

624-7724 
Chesnut. Lowell, Route 2. Box 141. London. 864-4453 
Clair, Cecil. Star Route 1. Box 144 Jackson, 666-5717, 666-9223 
Clark, Kenneth R.. Route 2. Hartford, 298-3293 
Clark. Lou. 2316 Brighton Drive. Lonisville. 469-3540 
Clardy, Barry D., Route 2. Box 188-C. Greenville. 338-3510, 

338-3036 
Clark, Robert L.. 303 Southern Drive. Clarksville. Tenn.. 

647-2196 
Clark. Tom, Spalding Avenue, Lebanon. 692-2034, Springfield 

336-3734 
Clem, Hobart, Gray's Knob. 673-3222 

Clemmons. Sam, 636 Central. Lexington. 255-7666. 255-7986 
Clevinger. Terry W.. Route 1. Box 180 Elkhorn City. 764-8378 
Clemens. Glen C., 90 Allison Lane. Jeffersonville. Ind.. 282-7498. 

636-3711 
Cloud. Ralph L.. P. O. Box 635. Harlan. 837-3157. 573-1950 
Cobb, Charles E., P. O. Box 393. Smithland. 928-2712 
Cochran, Roy H.. Jr.. 509 Master. Corbin. 628-1697. 864-4330 
Coffey. Marion L.. 2503 Savannah. Louisville. 425-0289, 

969-3271 
Coffey, Robert A.. P. O. Box 511, London, 864-6824, 864-4106 
Coffman, C. Morris, P. O. Box 200, Madisonville. 821-2600, 

821-5150 
Coleman. Daniel L., 641 Grand Ave., Covington, 261-2388, 

431-3207 
Coleman, Duke, 614 Pasadena Drive, Lexington. 277-3672 
Coleman, James F., Phelps, 4B6-3691 



Colley, Lynn W., 411 E. 23rd St., Hopkinsville, 885-9538. 

886-4463 
Collier, Burnard, Sidney, 353-4111 
Collins, Hubert, Wittensville. 297-3152. 789-3663 
Collins, Ronald K., 2590 Old Buttermilk. Villa Hills, Covington. 

341-0578, 431-9964 
Colvin, Jack, 3605 N. Evans, Evansville, Ind., HA 3-1696, 

HA 6-2314 
Combs, Keith A., 4619 Covert Ave., Evansville, Ind., 477-2869, 

476-3051 
Combs, W. Engene. Route 2. Box 239, Hazard, 251-3310. 436-6441 
Conley, Gary D.. Route 1. Box 310. Ashland, 928-6678 
Conley, Merritt, Leburn, 785-6714 

Conlin, Martin T., 464 Hazen St.. Ludlow, 291-8570 
Cooksey. Marvin. 6905 Orville, Louisville, 969-3585 
Copley, Sidney M., P. O. Box 352, Delbarton, W. Va. 
Cornett, Ray, Gilley, 589-4407 

Cornwell, James, 506 S. Main St., Franklin. 686-4237. 686-4451 
Cotton, Carl W.. 616 Central Ave.. Wurtland. 836-6803, 836-5033 
Covington, Roy C, 4405 Rockwood Drive, Louisville, 458-3926. 

368-2534 
Cox, Alva J., 706 Bryan Road. Evansville. Ind.. 426-8793, 

422-4356 
Cox, Kenny. Box 667. Corbin, 628-2444 
Coy. Charlie S., Boston 

Cracraft, Kenny, Route 2, Mayslick, 763-3694 
Cravens, Richard F., 2713 Rodman Ave.. Louisville. 637-1906 
Cravens. Robert L., 2707 So. 6th St.. Louisville. 637-2361 
Crawford. Gordon, 2609 Kings Highway Louisville, 461-5906. 

778-5531 
Crisp, Don E., Route 3, Box 273, Ashland, 928-6868. 928-8183 
Crump, David E.. 645-A Rosewood Drive. Lexington. 229-9103 
Cullum, Harold P.. 3943 Rhodes Ave.. New Boston. Ohio, 

456-6229, 466-4669 
Culp. Ronald D., 317 Walnut. Bellevue. 261-7834. 243-6663 
Gulp. Willard E., 318 Skyline Park Drive. Hopkinsville, 

886-7967 
Cummins. Ray E., P. O. Box 428. Mt. Vernon, 266-4376, 

256-2922 
Cundiff. Curt, Dry Creek Road, Clearfield. 784-4516 
Curtis. Douglas E., 475 Florence Ave.. Fairborn. Ohio. 879-1604 
Curtis. Robert Roy. 202 Chattanooga Ave., Louisville, 367-6582, 

361-1371 
Dalton. John P., P. O. Box 254, Morgantown, 626-4633 
Dame, L. J., 2925 McAlister Place, Owensboro, 684-5681, 

683-2401, ext. 238 
Daniel, Roger T., Inez Road, Paintsville, 789-3372, Prestonsburg 

886-2311 
Daniels, Robert A.. P. O. Box 2. Van Lear, 789-3931 
Dann, Nick, 160 Main St.. Morehead, 784-5696, 784-6040 
Daum, Charles A.. 216 Christ Road. Evansville. Ind.. 424-0217 
Davenport. James E., 9810 Dawson Hill, Jeffersontown, 

239-5667, 454-7511. ext. 3765 
Davis. Ralph C. 1326 So. 7th St.. Ironton. Ohio, 632-8606. 

532-8143 
Dovis, Lornie Joe, 503 Apperson Drive, Mt. Sterling, 498-3300, 

498-2250 
Davis, Ralph E., Sr., 1007 Front, Vanceburg. 796-4601, 796-2621 
Dawson, Alby Lewis, 636 22nd St.. Dunbar, W. Va., 768-9247, 

768-3981, ext. 323 
Dawson. Jerry Thomas, Route 4. Cynthiana. 234-5316, 234-1001 
Day. Bill, 1128 Hopi Trail, Frankfort. 227-7634. 664-3106 
Day. Jack L.. 605 Morehead St.. Central City, 754-4700, 764-2272 
Dean, Jerry W., McKee, 287-7301, 287-7161 
Dennedy. Bob. 5083 Orangelawn Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

922-8352, 922-2300 
Denton, Charles, 127 Hubbard Lane, Henderson, 826-4020, 

826-9533 
Denton. William D., 127 Hubbard Lane, Henderson, VA 6-4020 
Derrickson, Richard, 621 Cardinal Lane, Lexington, 278-6360, 

252-2312 
DeVary, Bill, 2929 Brigadoon, Lexington, 277-7237. 233-2000, 

ext. 3830 
Dickison. Ruddie. Route 6, Box 180, Olive Hill. 286-2194 
Dierolf. Col. William H., Jr.. Forest Drive, Applewood Manor, 

Dallas, Pa., 675-663 632-1056 
Dills, Bernie. 6616 Craigland. Cincinnati. Ohio, 231-4027, 

421-6700, ext. 591 
Disken, Jim, 2930 Vine St.. Cincinnati, Ohio, 281-0136, 281-9264 
Divine. Wayne L., 400 West 4th St., Central City, 764-2783, 

764-2272 
Dixon, Billy M.. Airport Gardens, Hazard. 436-4606, 436-3423 
Dockery, Donald, 3631 Rodenberg, Evansville, Ind., 424-6589 
Donald. Edward W., Co. C. 19th Maint.. APO New York 09146 
Dorsey. James. 4062 Vinedale Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, 471-8050 
Dotson, John B.. Ill Beech St., Vincennes. Ind.. 882-8095 
Douthwaite. Donald Dennis, 6616 Merwin Ave., Cincinnati, 

Ohio, 661-0916, 662-0891 
Driskell, Earl, Jr., 3311 Moulton Lane, Louisville, 459-4856, 

684-7105 
Downs, Joseph W., 829 Bartley. Bardstown. 348-5123. 348-3991 
Duckworth, Johnny, 1430 Frederica. Owensboro, 685-2206 
Drake, Richard R.. 72 Donnelly Drive, Fort Thomas, 441-4235 
Duerson. William Robert, Route 2. Paint Lick, 92B-23B7, 

792-2.459 
Duff. Birchell. P. O. Box 41. Garrett. 368-9391 (Bus.) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1968 



Page Nine 



Duff. Earl, 202 Leimaur Drive. Richmond. 436-2725 
Dunagan, Leon. 8219 Delido. Louisville. 969-3921. 636-2525 
Duncan, Gilbert F.. 3110 Commander. Louisville. 458-5144, 

3S6-9661, ext. 637 
Duncil. Charles. P. O. Box 151. Beattyville, 464-8708 
Durbin, Hade. Jr., 303 Morningside Drive, Elizabethtown, 

765-7893. 765-5237 
Durbin, Roy. 2911 Dale Ann Drive. Louisville, 452-1730, 587-1121. 

ext. 265 
Durden, John B.. 501 Apache Drive. Hopkinsville. 886-6062 
Duvall. Thomas Jay, Sr.. 4924 Cedarbrook Court, Louisville. 

368-1064. 896-0383 
Eastridge. Bobby A.. 229 Jan St.. Campbellsville. 465-6942. 

466-8121 
Eblen, John. Route 2, Corydon. VA 7-5004 
Edgington, Fred. 312 Ninth St.. Manchester. 549-5062 
Edwards. Ernest S.. Jr., 823 S. 39th St.. Louisville, 774-5496, 

684-0201 
Edwards, High Richard. Route 2, Hardyville. 628-2013. 765-6217 
Elliott. Billy. 5500 Maryman Road, Pleasure Ridge Park, 

937-4343, 937-4343 
Elliott, Carroll L.. 307 College. Elizabethtown. 765-4007. 765-6118 
Ellis. Johnny. P. O. Box 331, Prestonsburg. 6-2751, 6-3080 
Emery. George, 234 Clay, New Albany, Ind.. 944-5257, 283-3511. 

ext. 242 
Engle. Orville, 128 Oak St.. Pineville. 337-2916 
Farley. Jimmy. West Jefferson. Berea. 986-3929. 623-1310 
Farmer. Billie L.. 203 S. 16th. Mayfield, 247-7189. 247-1941 
Farris. Willard H.. 303 N. Third. Williamsburg, 549-0809 
Faulk. Terry Wayne. Shop Street, Mortons Gap, BL 8-6497, 

BL 8-6497 
Feher, Al, 142 E. Main, Lynch. 848-2547. 848-5431 
Feix, Al, Box 520, Henderson. 826-3331, 826-9051 
Ferguson, Roy F., Route 3. Barbourville. 546-3893. 546-4007 
Ferrell, Jimmy, 236 Kelley Drive. Glasgow, 651-8460 
Fields. Mickey Joe. Box 28 Morehead State University. More- 
head, 784-7798. 784-4181. ext. 342 
Fields. Rufus. Jr., 210 Moren Road, London, 864-2207 (Bus.) 
Finley. Albert R.. 114 Millbrooke Drive. Hopkinsville. 886-4108. 

886-8335 
Fish, Leland Gilbert, 826 Oak Hill. Lexington. 255-7156 
Fletcher. Curtis. Borderland. W. Va. 

Fletcher, John, 807 Barbourville St., Corbin. 528-2291. 628-3902 
Flowers. Randal B.. Route 1, Cecilia, 862-4275. 769-1356 
Floyd, Richard, Route 1. Bagdad. 747-8751. 747-8751 
Flynn. Reynolds, 1414 Sleepy Hollow, Park Hills, Covington, 

581-9837, 431-1128 
Flynn. Robert D., 428 MoKenna Court, Lexington, 299-5902. 

256-2481 
Ford, Ronald Kenneth. 208-B Main. Falmouth, 664-3756, 664-3365 
Foster, Berryman. 927 Waverly Drive, Lexington, 255-7374. 

252-2312 
Foster. Bob. P. O. Box 94. Science Hill. 423-3313. 678-8161 
Fox. David G., Beattyville. 464-8536 
Frady, Claude Wesley, P. O. Box 88, Wayland. 358-2332. 

368-2332 
Fraley. Bill. 1604 Lee Drive. Henderson. VA 7-3232 
Fraley. Joe. 1704 E. Main St.. Greenup. 473-7075 
Frankel. Louis S.. 3723 Stanton Blvd.. Louisville, 454-6519, 

464-6619 
Frazer, Tom Roe. Route 1. Sturgis. 333-4412, 333-4672 
Freese, OUie, 6518 Mapleridge, Cincinnati, Ohio, 661-5398, 

361-7010 
Freppon, Tom, 37 Towanda, Highland Height, 781-0683, 421-1800, 

ext. 676 
Frey. William R.. 236 Eidgeway. Southgate. 441-1286 
Fugate. E. Hugh. 115 Louisville Road. Frankfort. 223-1340, 

664-3990 
Fulkerson. Bob. 1121 Minors Lane, Louisville. 964-1360. GL 

4-7611, ext. 4438 
Fuller. John R., Jr.. 4836 Epperson Road. Paducah, 898-3116. 

443-6626 
Fultz, Andrew (Jack), P. O. Box 536, Olive Hill, 286-2303, 

286-2481 
Gabbard, Donald Lee, P. O. Box 203. Booneville. 593-6522. 

593-6680 
Gabbard, John B., P. O. Box 85. London. 864-6082. 864-2863 
Galuk, Walter M., 1619 Bath Ave.. Ashland. 325-3305. 326-1751 
Gardner. Gary. Route 3. Magnolia. 628-2947, 528-2947 
Gardner. Howard E.. 829 McCullem. Elizabethtown 
Gentry. Bobby Gene. 3420 Candy Drive. Hopkinsville. 886-62i9. 

886-2515 
Gentry Dale J., 4945 Determine Lane, Louisville, 447-5981, 

686-6814 
Gettler, John F., 706 Providence Road. Lexington. 266-4801. 

264-4017 
Gibbs. Harold. 1116 Oaklawn Drive. Jeffersonville. Ind., 282-7865 
Gibbs. C. Richard. 2OV2 Boone, Winchester. 744-7584. 252-0361 

(Lexington) 
Gibson, Carl. P. O. Box 271. Mousie. 946-2390 
Gibson. Gary Lee, Wayland. 358-4580 
Gilbert. Gerald L.. 608 Highland, Vine Grove, 877-6094, 

4-7719 (Fort Knox 
Gilman, Ronald, Route 1, Box 183. Delbarton. W. Va. 
Giordano, Al. 107 Ratliff. Princeton, 366-6680, 366-5616 
Goebel, N. Glen, P. O. Box 236. Taylorsville. 477-8562. 477-2226 



Goheen. Larry. 819 Franz Court. Ashland. 324-8203. 622-0366 

(Huntington, W. Va.) 
Golden. Billy Joe. 436 E. Main. Lynch. 848-2612. 848-2512 
Goldey. William H.. 866 Lamont Lane. Henderson. 827-3622. 

826-3931 
Goley. Jim, 85 Allison Drive, Florence. 371-5177, 431-8335 
Goodin, Shirley G., P. O. Box 143. Pineville, 337-3982, 337-2436 
Goodman, Jack. 514 Springdale Road. Brandenburg. 422-2072', 

422-3363 
Goodman, Richard, P. O. Box 404, Pikeville. 437-4947. 437-9126 
Gordon. Levi J., 108 Eminence Terrace. Eminence. 846-5866. 

776-1501 
Gordon. Ronald F.. 346 S. Main, Eminence. 722-8811 (Bus.) 
Gour. Bob. 218 S. Lee. Bowling Green, 843-9582. 842-0316 
Grace. Charles K., Cypress Street, Pineville, 337-3331. 337-2348 
Grace. Hickory. Middlesboro, 248-1290. 337-3320 (Pineville) 
Grace. Lucian. 116 E. Broadway. Winchester, 744-5564 
Graham, Bruce E.. 430 N. Main St.. Greenville. 338-2295, 

476-2435 
Graves, J. Kenneth. Route 2. Mt. Olivet. 724-2441. 724-2861 
Gray. Kenneth E.. 2819 Thistlewood Drive. Louisville. 896-1202, 

464-0404 
Green, Donald, 832 Brand, Mayfield. 247-6038 
Greene. Therman R., 3814th Equipt. Maint. Gp.. APO New 

York 09184 
Greer, Richard Mack, V-1 Seminary Village, Louisville, 893-2796 
Griffey, Richard. P. O. Box 1425. Williamson, W. Va. 
Grigsby, Pete. Jr.. McDowell, 377-2356. 377-6202 
Grundy, Sammy. P. O. Box 2. Powderly, 338-4126 
Grunkemeyer, Michael, 3138 Willis. Cincinnati. Ohio, 321-7619 
Gustafson. Al "Gus." 248 Lincoln-Federal Bldg., Louisville, 

454-6151, 587-8102 
Haas. Tom, 51 Holly Woods. Fort Thomas. 441-9570. 635-2196 
Hagan. Joe. 3000 Sherbrooke Road. Louisville. 458-1326, 451-7424 
Hall, Richard Gary, 1122 Cooper Drive, Lexington. 266-3768 
Hall. Tommy D.. 117 Brockton. Richmond. 623-9299 
Hall. William C, Route 2, Eminence, 845-5528. 582-2658 
Ham. Ronald. 3008 Broadway. Evansville, Ind., 422-3371, 

424-2434 
Hamilton, Dallas A.. P. O. Box 62, Inez, 298-3465 
Hamilton. Walter F.. 3404 Bryan Way. Louisville. 459-6432, 

587-1121, ext. 265 
Hamm. Gerald, 1616 Oliver, Bowling Green. 842-6396, 842-5396 
Hamm, Harold D.. Route 6. Frankfort. 227-9800 
Hammock. Don L., 1512 Audubon Parkway, Louisville. 636-7111, 

683-6604 
Hancock. Norb. 3823 Mamaroneck, Louisville, 461-7368 
Haney, Raymond, Milo, 298-3308 
Hardin, Carl Ray. 34 Calumet Drive. Southland Mobile Manor, 

Louisville. 366-8923. 366-9611. ext. 279 
Hardin, Jack H.. 1105 B St.. Ceredo, W. Va. 
Hargis. Keith Noel. Route 1. Box 91. Science Hill. 423-3456 
Harmon. Glenn, 232 Madison, Danville, 236-6748, 236-2431 
Harney, Wayne, Route 6, Paris, 987-4442 
Harper, Randall H.. 11806 Dearing Woods Drive, Valley Station, 

937-6319. 772-3661, ext. 492 
Harper, Robie, P. O. Box 61. Beechmont. 476-8084. 476-8411 
Harris. Richard H.. Route 4, Nancy. 871-3221 
Harrison. Danny. P. O. Box 182. Vanceburg. 796-6541 
Harrison. John L., Webster Ext.. Cynthiana. 234-3333. 234-5721 
Harrison. William H., HQ. Co. Com. Gp., USATCA, Fort Knox, 

624-6123. 624-7911 
Harrod. Charles David, 2333 Sycamore, Louisville, 896-0160, 

684-4361 
Hartman. Robert E., 3647 Concerto Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

663-6647, 891-7133 
Hatfield. Cecil E., 1726 W. 6th St.. Williamson, W. Va. 
Hatfield. Dennis G., 4653 Virginia Ave.. Covington, 291-8542, 

431-3207 
Hawkins. Will A.. 407 Grace St.. Springfield, Tenn.. 384-8978, 

384-6683 
Hayden. Samuel J.. Fancy Farm. 623-8414. 623-8102 
Hazelwood. Howard P., 1211 Devonport. Lexington, 262-5112, 

264-8031, ext. 386 
Heath. Robert. Hardinsburg. 766-2387. 765-6058 
Heinichen. Carl C. 1941 Shollenberger Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

931-7997, 931-7997 
Heldman, John, Jr., 140 Seneca Trail, Louisville, 363-2181, 

636-4463 
Helton, Lewis W.. 334 Knox, Barbourville, 646-4746, 646-3920 
Henderson, Jesse C, Route 1, Box 26-A, Butler, 472-6691, 

472-6691 
Hensley, Larry O.. 226 E. High St., Lexington, 252-2493, 

299-1221, ext. 2117 
Hensley. Spencer D.. 4540 Broadway. Louisville 
Hess. Charles R.. 3425 Glendale. Louisville, 368-2397, 361-2661 
Hewitt. R. T. "Buddy," College Station, Murray, 753-6436, 

762-4391 
Hicks, Floyd E.. 43 New Uri. Florence 

Hicks, Harold Dane. Route 2. Cecilia. 862-4331. 862-3924 
Hicks. Lloyd. 6253 Springmeyer Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio,* 

662-5103. 771-6360. ext. 452 
Highbaugh. Ottis. P. O. Box 136. Bonnieville. 631-1876, 631-1200 
Hill, Earl F.. Route 6, Box 141, London, 864-2621, 864-2128 
Hilton, Billy, 323 Maplewood Ave., Springfield, 336-7694 
Hina, Roy D., Route 1, Wynn Addition, Sturgis, 333-2770, 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1968 



389-1454 
Hinton. Henry, 210 Witawanga, Lyndon. 425-7627. GL 4-7511 
Hisle, Charlie R., 21 Locust Drive, Winchester. 744-5754. 

299-1211. ext. 3233 (Lexingtoni 
Hitt. Billy D., Route 2. Maysville, 759-7707, 664-9156 
Hoffmeier. Paul C. 3468 Tangent Drive. Cheviot, Ohio, 

481-6573. 742-2262 
Hofatetter. Joe. P. O. Box 1816, Williamson. W, Va. 
Holeman. Bill R.. 103 Locust. Manchester. 598-2999 
Hollan, Raymond William. Main Street. Bea.ttyville. 464-2566 
Holmes. Roe D., 2501 Penix, Ashland. 324-3065 
Holt, Larry K.. P. O. Box 384. Jamestown. 343-2983 (Bus.) 
Holt, Robert E., 3303 Southgate. Hopkinsville, 885-3405, 

886-1207 
Holthouser. Terry W., 6322 Georgia Lane, Louisville. 964-2960, 

239-3267 
Hook, B. B., Jr., 801 Minerva. Murray. 753-2387. 924-5677 
Hook. Don, Cunningham, 642-2891 
Hopper, Lester Alan, Route 1, Crofton 
Hopper, Marion W.. 406 Pennsylvania Ave., Elizabethtown, 

769-1598. 765-5877 
Hord, Tracy. 318 East High, Lebanon. 692-3612 
Horn, Everett. Jr.. P. O. Box 466, Inez. 298-3423. 298-3217 
Horsman, Bill, 2902 S. 6th St., Louisville, 637-1201, 683-7621 
Houchens, Joe Danny, Route 4. Glasgow. 678-2317. 651-8371 
Houchin. Douglas M., 1026 Phillips Lane, Louisville, 366-7338, 

EM 6-7620 
Howard. Henry D., IIII/2 Chester Ave., Middlesboro, 248-1115, 

248-2366 
Hubbard. David. 236 Sycamore. Jackson. 666-6436, 666-7181 
Hubbs, Cletus, 221 Sherwood, Hopkinsville, 885-8578, 886-3384 
Huber. Jerry. 2873 W. McMicken, Cincinnati, Ohio, 681-0897, 

431-6723 
Hudnall. William E.. 13 Woodmont Court. Paris. 987-1641. 

987-4700 
Hudson, Oscar, P. O. Box 32. Sassafras. 476-2567. 436-2141 
Hughes, Paul P., 620 Riverside Drive, Prestonsburg. 886-6471, 

886-2170 
Hulette, Walter D., 82 Bullittsburg Church Road, Burlington, 
689-7463, 689-7453 

Hunley, Neil P.. 672 Main St., West Liberty. 743-4311, 743-4613 
Hunter, Charles, P. O. Box 443. Evarts, 837-2817. 837-2327 
Hunter, Thurman, P. O. Box 172, Pineville, 337-2321 (Bus.) 
Hurt. Thomas C. 122 Hamilton Ave.. Lancaster. 792-3067, 

792-2312 
Hyatt, Bob, 323 E. Court St., L^wrenceburg, 278-6421 <Bus.) 
Hyland, Frank D., P. O. Box 466, South Webster. Ohio, 

778-2401. 466-4161 
Hyman. Alan, 2340 Brookside Drive, Louisville, 454-3119, 

464-3119 
Ingraham, Gary J.. 9706 Lanesboro Way. Louisville, 425-6216, 

897-2815 
Jackson. Arthur E., c/o Whitesburg Hospital, Whitesburg. 

633-2958. 633-2211 
Jackson, Robert H.. P. O. Box 827, Grayson, 474-5306 
Jacobs, Dorris R., 254 Seminole, Paducah. 442-5233, 443-2461 
Jamison, Mark C. 9100 Aristides Drive, Louisville. 937-6923 
Jent, Richard. 9303 Wilcox Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio 
Johns, Jerry. P. O. Box 308. Somerset. 678-6610. 678-4721 
Johnson. Gayle W.. 722 Warrendale Court. Georgetown. 863-0154 
Johnson. Harry B.. 3024 Stanford Drive. Lexington, 277-2889, 

266-0532 
Johnson, James M., 174 Pinehurst Drive, Frankfort, 223-2822. 

876-1636 
Johnson. Jerry Lee. 313 Kentucky Ave.. Georgetown. 863-0333, 

233-2000. ext. 2516 
Johnson. Walter. Route 2. Box 203. Grayson. 474-5908. 474-6721 
Johnson. W. Bernard. Route 7. Box 286. Hopkinsville. 269-2208. 

886-6161 
Joiner. D. Russell. P. O. Box 213. Smithland. 928-2253. 928-2492 
Jones. Boyer, 427 Jackson. Campbellsville. 466-5953. 465-8880 
Jones. Carson G.. 713 N. Main. Evansville. Ind.. 422-3069. 

424-7741. ext. 360 
Jones. Denver. Highland Avenue, Apt. 11-A. Hazard. 436-2666, 

436-6771 
Jones. Frank. P. O. Box 718. Manchester 598-2706 
Jones. Joe S.. 203 Green St.. Manchester. 698-3793. 698-2129 
Jones. Robert L.. Jr., 829 Old Ekron Road, Brandenburg, 

422-3484, 422-2101 
Jones, William L., 814 McCullum Ave.. Elizabethtown, 765-6061, 

765-6247 
Justice. Monty D., Jr., 8608 Perry R>oad. Louisville, 897-2693. 

774-6515 
Kasinger. W. D.. 1221 Girvin Court. Owensboro. 686-2340. 

684-3234 
Kays. Herbert S.. 1801 Spring Drive. Louisville 
Kazee. Allan J.. P. O. Box 364. Irvington. 547-6293, 624-7252 
Keeling, Joe, 1944 Monroe. Paducah. 443-2653. 442-8227 
Keeling. Reuben. 3767 Ramona Drive, Paducah, 442-4190 
Kelly. Charles R., 4206 Greenwell Lane, Louisville. 447-2666. 

684-1341. ext. 204 
Kelsch. Bon, 8899 Balboa, Cincinnati, Ohio, 931-3902, 243-3696 
Kcmplin, Frank. Route 2. California. 472-2651 
Kidd, Frank. Jr.. Dana 

Kidwell. James S.. 1112 Parkway. Covington. 291-6856 
Kimmel, Jerry. Beechmont. 476-2666. 476-266* 



Kinder. Robert A.. 626 Anniston Drive. Lexington 299-6793, 

264-3746 
King, James A.. 6000 Clarmar Road, Jeffersontown, 239-8016, 

778-2791 
King, Raymond H., 216 Blossom Lane. Southgate. 441-6309, 

261-4357 
Kinney. Charles L.. P. O. Box 36. McKinney. 346-3761. 346-2101 
Kinney. Dale, 411 E. Pleasant, Cynthiana. 234-1042, 234-1100, 

ext. 248 
Kiser. Arvle, 1102 Gainesway Drive, Lexington, 266-5171, 

254-6143 
Knight, Bill. 752 N. 36th. Paducah. 443-2775, 443-2776 
Knight, Rodney, Route 1, Box 282-A, Greenville, 338-3536 
Koehne, Charles, 1826 Sherman, Norwood, Ohio, 631-1179, 

941-2400, ext. 304 
Kuhl, Lawrence. Houser Lane. London, 864-6235, 864-4182 
Lacer. Albert Hay. P. O. Box 51. Spottsville. VA 7-1407. VA 

6-9673 
Lacer. Wayne. 3003 Palmer Circle. Henderson. VA 7-1407 
Lamastus. James R., 700 Reynolds, Central City, 764-3962, 

338-3911 
Lambert, R. E. (Bob). Ohio River Road, Greenup, 473-9510 
Lancaster. Glenn, 1506 Porter Drive, Henderson, 826-4364, 

826-9022 
Larsen, George. 7864 A. Estrada. Fort Knox. 4-6987. 4-1664 
Laskey, George O.. P. O. Box M. Beattyville, 464-2609 
Laugherty. Kenneth Ray, 2100 Peabody Lane, Louisville. 

451-1706. 584-1211 
Lawson. Rondell. Garrett, 358-3631 
Layne. Bert. Manton 
Lee, Robert L.. 6810 Dartmoor Drive. Louisville. 426-3863, 

895-2431 
Leigh, Eugene F., 606 17th St.. Corbin. 628-1601. 528-1212, ext. 

35 
Letcher. Ronnie. Route 2. Carlisle, 289-5573, 289-2208 
Lewis, Johnnie D.. 807 White St.. Cumberland 
Lightfoot, Terry. 67 Rossford. Fort Thomas. 441-5327. 261-4028 
Lile. Clyde F.. 429 Henderson Drive. Hopkinsville, 886-5584, 

886-4463 
Lindsey, Jack, Blackey, 633-6353, 436-4897 
Linette. James M.. 1601 Newburg Road. Louisville. 461-2894. 

451-2894 
List. Frank A.. Route 3. Owensboro. 683-6669. 684-528B 
Lloyd. David. 615 Elm St.. Ludlow. 681-1119. 441-7100 
Lockard. Lando. 88 Roselawn Drive. Independence. 356-6325 
Logan, Donald E., Route 4. Falmouth. 654-3683. 664-3683 
Long. Bill, 1515 Tyler Park Drive. Louisville. 458-4989 
Long, Robert F.. 664 Lombardy Drive, Lexington. 299-7226, 

262-2626 
Loudy, Kenneth. Slemp. 675-4278. 675-4278 

Lovell. Monty Joe. 429 Oak St.. Richmond. 623-1304. 623-4959 
Lovely. Johnny, Elsie, FI 9-2649 
Lowe, James D., Jr.. 119 Valleybrook Road, Bowling Green. 

842-3734. 842-6515 
Lucas. Jack G.. 612 Elsmere Pk.. Lexington. 255-3744. 254-6412 
McCargo. Frank. 1713 E. 9th St.. Hopkinsville. 886-1948. 

885-9400 
McClain. Gerald L.. Star Route, Mayfield. 247-2662, 247-3101 
McCoy. Hayse. P. O. Box 265. Inez. 298-3417. 298-3417 
McDannold. Lewis, 340 Ridgewood, Versailles, 873-6134. 266-1167 
McEtonald, Legon. 208 York. Greenville. 338-4574. 754-3000 
McGlasson, Galen, 212 N. Bend Road, Hebron, 689-7330, 689-7342 
McGlone, Maurice B., 213 Western Ave.. Cynthiana. 234-2716. 

234-3763 
McKinney, Adelle, 6th Fid. Hospital, APO San Francisco 96346 
McL"»n. Gordon, Cody, 642-3326 

McLeod, Robert, Box 520, Somerset, 678-5636, 678-8766 
McMillian, Terry L., 3064 Percy, Cincinnati, Ohio. 662-9106. 

381-6101 
McNeely. Albert T.. 301 N. Wilson, Morehead. 784-6814, 784-7628 
McPike, Ray S.. Jr.. 407 Theatre Bldg.. 629 S. 4th St.. Louis- 
ville. 451-3832. 586-2832 
Madden. McEIroy. 463 Lindberg Drive. Lexington, 266-6504. 

255-6504 
Marlette. Ronald L.. 1004 Delia Drive. Lexington. 278-6374 
Marshall. T. N.. 901 Comanche Court. Ashland. 324-0113. 

324-1155. ext. 376 
Martin. Billy. P. O. Box 172. Sharpsburg. 247-2771. 247-2421 
Martin. Carl T.. P. O. Box 13. McKinney. 346-3506 
Martin. Charlie. P. O. Box 206. Sharpsburg. 247-2141. 247-3031 
Martin. Donald. Route 1. Dry Ridge. 823-6221 
Mari;in. Sam, Jr.. McDowell. 377-6380 

Masden. Steven Ray. Route 1. Lebanon Junction, 833-4465 
Mason. Edwin M., 1824 Augusta Drive Lexington, 299-9472 
Mason, Gene A.. Route 6. Mayfield. 247-6014. 663-6778 
Massie, Stephen. 10708 Milwaukee Way. Valley Station, 

937-4406. EM 6-7520 
Mathis. Mike. 8447 Foxcroft Drive. Cincinnati. Ohio. 522-9010, 

662-6626 
Mauk, Michael J., 830 W. Main. Morehead. 784-4412. 643-3611 
Mauney. Bill. 102 Crab Orchard Road, Somerset. 679-2977. 

679-1674 
Mayer. John P.. P. O. Box 27. Frenchburg. 768-4911. 768-2373 
Mayfield. John W.. Route 1. Box 229, Ironton. Ohio, B32-B363, 

736-5252 (Huntington. W. Va.) 
Maynaxd. James H.. P. O. Box 292. Inez, 298-3848 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1968 



Page Eleven 



Maynard, Kenneth, P. O. Box 2056, Pikeville, 432-1354. 432-1451 

Maynard, Lonnie, Freeburn, 456-3563 

Maynard, Raymond L., Warfield. 395-5120. 298-3501 

Meade, Foster Sid, P. O. Box 131, Vanceburg, 796-2862. 796-2751 

Melear, Leland, 7306 Supremus Drive. Louisville, 935-3654. 

454-7511, ext. 3987 
Melton. Bob. 1406 Young St.. Henderson. VA 7-3067. VA 7-1838 
Menefee. Charles F., Route 1. Box 60. Hitchins. 474-5860 
Mielcaiek. Chester. 718 Cindy Blair Way. Lexington 
Milbern. Dan, 1049 Patricia Lane. Lexington. 255-5438, 233-2000. 

ext. 2143 
Miles, Robert J., 1113 W. Mill Road. Evansville. Ind.. 423-7419. 

423-7419 
Miller. Bob. 197 Holiday Lane. Fort Thomas, 441-5885, 635-2191 
Miller, Ferrel, Route 1, Murray. 435-5271. 435-5271 
Miller. Harold P., 103 E. 24th St.. Benton, 527-8749, 395-4121. 

ext. 211 
Miller. James C. 1225 Twelfth. Tell City, Ind., 547-4590, 547-2311 
Miller. J. Gordon. 2607 Garden Lake Lane. Louisville, 267-7013, 

366-9511. ext. 830 
Miller. Rex. 2711 Greenway Road. Ashland. 324-5023. 325-4706 
Miller. Tommy. Route 2. Cecilia, 862-3845, 543-2221, ext. 89 
Miller. Victor L.. 26 Pine Hill Drive, Highland Heights. 

781-0619, 441-9853 
Moberly, Harold F.. 614 Cecil Way, Lexington. 277-3214. 

254-7791 
Monahan. Ed. 6629 Plantation Way. Cincinnati, Ohio, 521-6582, 

681-8300 
Montgomery, Chester. 128 Meadowbrook. Bowling Green. 

842-3214, 842-3214 
Moore. Marvin. Normal Hall 9. Morehead 
Moore. Richard E.. Route 3. Box 247. Mt. Vernon. Ind.. 

783-2513, 838-4886 
Moore, Wayne F., 305 Brockton. Richmond. 623-6386 
Moser. Rudy C. 504 Bluff St.. Providence. 667-2997 
Moskowitz. Mark, 4148 Paddock Road. Cincinnati. Ohio. 281-5181. 

242-2100 
Mueller. Jack R.. 4200 Leo Lane. Jeffersontown. 267-1459. 

636-1381 
Mullins. Arthur. Elkhorn City. 754-4041, 754-7981 
Murphy, Tom. 234 W. Main St.. Frankfort. 227-7966. 227-4439 
Murrell. Allen L.. 1804 Woodhurst Drive. Bowling Green. 

842-1286. 842-8829 
Napier. Wallace. Jr.. Mary Alice. 575-3721 
Ness. Max A.. 613 College Court, Murray, 762-4770 
Newland. William D.. Main Street. Highland. 784-4612 
Newman. Bill, 2535 Ritchie, Portsmouth. Ohio, 353-6257 
Newnam, Larry G., 268-B Radcliffe Road, Lexington, 299-9230. 

264-6627 
Nichols. Billy Joe, 398 East 6th St.. Russellville. 726-7330 
Noel. John (Pete). 31 E. 43rd St.. Covington. 291-7739, 231-6685 
Norris. Kibby S.. 1124 South 3rd St.. Louisville 
Nunnelley. Steve. Roselawn Drive. Williamstown. 824-4557, 

242-9898 
Nuss. Albert M.. 7706 Kim Drive. Louisville, 367-6791, 368-5825 
Oldham, John H., P. O. Box 254E. Prospect. 228-1698 
Oliver. Gary. Route 1. Lancaster. 792-3841 
Oiler. Jerry. 1967 Goldsmith Lane. Apt. A-10. Louisville, 

458-9761. 583-6581 
Orton. Jimmy A., 4703 Glenna Way, Louisville. 964-3095, 

587-1292 
Otis. Billy, Hutcherson Heights. Hodgenville. 358-3615 
Overby. Jerry. Route 6. Murray. 436-2454. 753-1250 
Overton. Frank. Jr.. P. O. Box 36. Four Mile. 337-2026. 337-3684 
Owens. Bruce E.. P. O. Box 917. Harlan. 573-1686. 573-1661 
Owens, Bruce Van. P. O. Box 12, New Castle, 346-5348 
Pack, James. 1420 E. Second. Maysville. 564-5773. 742-3600 
Padgett. R. K.. 2021.. College St.. Somerset. 678-5485. 678-4141 
Palko. Edward T., 126 Holmes St., Frankfort, 223-8049. 223-0565 
Park. J. M.. Box 299. Paducah. 898-2785 
Parrish, Dale C, Route 2, Jackson Heights. Morehead. 784-7281, 

784-4181. ext. 215 
Parrish. Willie, Route 2. Box 601. McClure Road. Winchester. 

744-2903. 744-7384 
Parrott. Lanny L.. 202 Bibb St.. Campbellsville, 465-8741, 

465-8741 
Parsons, Kenneth, Loyall 

Partin, Billy Ray. Box 41. Four Mile. 337-3185. 337-3284 
Patterson. Bill. 574 Oak St.. Madisonville. 821-1359. 821-6833 
Patterson. Temme J.. 2216 Ridgecrest Drive. Evansville, Ind., 

476-9026. 425-1545 
Paulin. Al. 538 Franklin. Tell City. Ind.. 547-3323 
Peay. Curtis. C-22. Bowling Green. 843-3616. 843-8171 
Pedigo. Albert M.. 610 Gheens Ave.. Louisville. 368-1283, 

459-5506 
Pence, Jerry. Hillview Trailer Court. Lot 30, Bowling Green, 

843-1306 
Penner. Merritt O.. Jr., Route 4. Box 739. Manchester. 598-3711 
Perkins. Ronnie L.. Upton, 369-2439, 769-2311 
Perry, Clyde Thomas, 200 N. Hamilton, Georgetown. 863-2057. 

254-0386 
Perry. James E.. Route 6, Paducah. 554-2945. 554-1706 
Phelps. Danny Howard, 154 Bonnie Brae. No. 4. Lexington. 

254-6327 
Phelps. Ralph "Rudy." P. O. Box 84. Ashland. 836-3670. 
325-1155. ext. 258 



Phelps. Ray, P. O. Box 533. Russell. 836-6646. 928-6533 

Phillips. Thomas M.. Route 2. Box 474. Pikeville, 639-4152 

Ping. Denton. Eubank. 379-3221. 379-4661 

Poe. James R.. Route 6. Benton. 527-9537 

Pope. Roy, Route 5, Box 183, London. 864-6716. 864-2491 

Poppas. Nickolas. 1996 Republic. Dayton. Ohio, 277-2773 

Prater. Rondel R.. Hueysville. 886-2487 (Bus.) 

Price. Don M.. 103 Congress, Evansville. Ind.. 477-8678. 477-8944 

Price. James E.. Liberty. 787-7296, 787-6323 

Profitt. Lawrence K., Route 5, Winchester, 744-3409 

Pi-uitt. John R.. 607 E. Jackson. Clinton. OL 3-6415 

Pryor. Charles Wm., 8939 Applewood Drive. Cincinnati. Ohio. 

791-0073 
Purdy. Jesse. 412 Tabler Ave.. Harrodsburg. 734-3170. 734-3242 
Racke. Jerry William. Ill Orchard Lane. Alexandria. 635-2446, 

636-2191 
Rader. Douglas. McKee. 287-7326 
Rakel. Bob. 3152 Mary Jane Drive, Cincinnati. Ohio. 661-2885. 

531-7625 
Ramey. Herb, Farmers. 784-4724. 784-7726 

Rash. Lindell L.. P. O. Box 268. Mortons Gap, 268-6136. 258-6362 
Ravenscraft. Glendon. 39 Newman Ave.. Fort Thomas. 441-5991. 

635-2191 
Redman. Melvin P.. Route 3. Box 44. Mt. Vernon. Ind., 783-2276. 

838-3791 
Reed. Charles. 62 Elizabeth St.. Versailles. 873-4213. Lexington 

252-1122 
Reed. William F., Sr.. 633 Dartmoor Drive. Lexington. 299-1130 
P.ees. Gayle H.. 1613 Atlanta Drive. Lexington. 299-7316. 

299-1221. ext. 5231 
Reeves. Curtis R.. 608 Barkley. Falmouth. 654-6241 
Reherman. Fred James. 2805 Woodmont Drive. Louisville, 

459-6573 
Reinhardt. Myron. Box 403 B2. Alexandria. 636-5724. 635-9113 
Reliford. Paul G.. 4130 Cabell. Ashland. 326-7457 
Reschar. John V.. 5518 Pico Lane, Louisville. 969-3885. 239-3267 
Reule. Ronald. P. O. Box 56. Germantown. 795-2395. 742-3600 
Reuther. James. 1725 Bonnyville Blvd.. Apt. 3 Louisville. 

447-8201. 935-1345 
Rexroat. Jerry L.. 7424 Jamaica Drive. Louisville. 935-2116, 

447-3221 
Rice William L.. 3011 Jefferson Ave.. Evansville. Ind.. 

477-3676 
Rich. Dennis W.. Crittenden Road, Verona, 486-7233, 291-9700 
Ricketts. Donald. 326 Audubon Drive. Mt. Vernon. Ind., 

838-5206. 424-7741. ext. 206 
Rife. Don C. Box 65. Inez. 298-3563. 298-3577. 
Riggs, Floyd L.. Route 8. Box 4O0, Evansville. Ind., 867-3090. 

425-3346 
Rison. Johnny B.. 197 Third St.. Ravenna. 723-2852 
Rister, Edgar L.. P. O. Box 213. Garrett. 358-4428 
Ritter. Goebel. 416 Cornelia Ave.. Whitesburg. 633-7164. 633-4455 
Roach. Earl Wilton. Star Route. Mayfield. 247-6078. Fulton 

472-3712 
Roberts. Donald G.. Bob-A-Link Drive. Harrodsburg. 734-4766. 

734-3673 
Roberts. Gerald V.. No. 40 Normal Hall. Moreread. 784-9286 
Roe. Doyle "Buddy." Jr.. Isom. 633-2058. 633-2339 
Roeckers Bernie. 803 Loda Drive. Cincinnati. Ohio. 752-1140. 

831-2990 
Roesel. Joseph F., 31 Huckleberry Hill. Fort Mitchell. 331-1880. 

563-6000. ext. 709 
Rogers. Howard. 17 Maryland Ave.. Winchester. 744-1785. 

Lexington 299-1221. ext. 4152 
Roller. Otis C. 808 Chambery Drive. Louisville. 895-6356, 

587-1121, ext. 396 
Roney Robert D.. 1108 S. Seminary. Princeton. Ind.. 385-6500 
Roy. Charles David, 400 Lexington. Exansville. Ind., 422-5429, 

425-5552 
Runyon, Tommy Dean, P. O. Box 181. Belfry. 363-7883 
Russell. Allen. 1503 Sycamore. Murray, 753-2832, 444-6311, 

ext. 378 
Russell. Jake. 128 N. Main, Hartford. 298-3585. 274-3366 
Russell, Richard, Route 2. Box 209, Hazard, 251-2916 
Sallee. Alan L.. 1926 Goldsmith Lane. Louisville. 469-6166. 

683-0050 
Sams. Glenn, Millers Village, Auburn, 542-6139. 843-4340 
Sandusky, Jerry. Route 3 Liberty. 787-7742. 787-7484 
Saylor, Lanny Ross. P. O. Box 191. Wallins. 664-3918 
Schener. John P.. 22 Lyndale Road. Edgewood. 341-1846. 

636-2191 
Schleicher. Richard. Route 2. Borden. Ind.. Sellersburg 246-3232. 

Louisville. 582-5728 
Schlickman. Steve. 2490 Jerry's Lane. Fort Mitchell, 331-0381. 

431-1985 
Schnebelt. Carl R.. P. O. Box 334. Hanover. Ind.. 866-3581. 

866-3522 
Scott. Emmanuel. 1614 Potter Place. Cincinnati, Ohio, 281-6928, 

961-0022 
Scott. WMlie L.. 217 Showalter Drive. Georgetown, 863-3782. 

863-3321 « 

Serey. George E.. Jr.. 816 Win Ave.. Ashland. 324-5768. 

324-1155, ext. 609 
Shadle, Clark. 334 Knox St.. Barbourville. 546-4746. 546-3920 
Shaver. PeriT A.. P. O. Box 154. Bremen. 626-3877. 476-2441. 

ext. 286 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1%S 



Does Your Present Student 

Policy Cover Your Athletes? 

We Can Solve Your Problem. 



^Ae KUi(fden. Co4fi/pximf. 



GENERAL AGENT 



W. E. KINGSLEY 



121-123 LAFAYEnE AVENUE 

P O. BOX 7100 



J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. 

Life Depar+ment 
LEXINGTON, KY. 40502 



CHARLES C. PRICE 



PHONE 254-4095 



Shearer, Robert L., Lot 1, Harris Trailer Park. Radcliffe, 

351-9071, 624-7252 
Shields, Neil, Artemus Road, Barbourville, 546-3778, 546-9946 
Shope. Lowell M., P. O. Box 266, South Webster, Ohio, 

778-2425, 259-2356 
Shuck, Thomas G., 2073 Williamsburg, Lexington. 277-8780, 

278-5713 
Simpson. Fred C 20 Oak St., Fort 

681-6150, ext. 59 
Sims. Frank D.. 5303 Regent Way 

634-1511, ext. 259 
Singleton. Bobby, 5711 Omega, Louisville, 
ext. 3673 

Rockport. 274-4716 
, Box 110. Russell Springs 
372, Leitchfield, 259-3438, 
Route 1. Waynesbui-g. 



Box 135, Bedford, 265-3285 
2150 Glenworth Ave., Louisville, 



Mitchell, 331-3251. 
Louisville. 964-6493, 



937-4712. 464-7511. 



866-4342 
269-4144 
399-4315, 



Singleton, Jerry. Route 1 
Skaggs, Bobby L.. Route 
Skaggs. Robert. P. O. Box 
Skidmore. Richard Lynn, 

365-7341 
Small. Bill, 1846 Mary Catherine Drive, Louisville, 448-4859, 

584-6308 
Smith, Gary U., 600 Walnut. Waverly. Ohio. 947-4627. 947-2163 
Smith, James Gayle. P. O. Box 202, Burlington. 586-6048. 

586-7200 
Smith, James H.. Route 1, Box 437, South Shore, 932-4497 
Smith. Roy M., Watts 
Smith, Wayne N.. 313 Beechwood, Campbellsville, 465-5268. 

Columbia 384-2751 

311 Beechwood Drive, Campbellsville, 



6347 Beechmont. Apt. 39. Cincinnati. 



Smith. Willard N.. 

466-6339. 465-4191 
Smith, Winchell, Jr., 

Ohio. 232-1333 
Smith, W. Jack, 203 Ohio. Somerset. 679-1211, 252-6602 
Smithson. Richard A.. 302 W. Main, Lynch, 848-2867, 848-5450 
Snow, James A., Route 1. Williamstown. 823-4611 
Snow. Robert W., Route 2, Williamstown. 823-2712 
Somerville. Robert J., 6852 Greenmeadow Cir., Louisville 
Sparks, Keith E.. Jr.. 6600 Watch Hill Road, Louisville. 

239-9093. 366-9611. ext. 273 
Speck. Michael E.. Route 3. Elizabethtown. 
Spiceland, S. E.. 305 S. loth St., Murray, 
Spivey. Ronald L.. 118 Baughman Ave.. 
Spoonamore. Jim. Ill Pettus Court. Stanford, 365-2348 
Stallard. N. H.. P. O. Box 135. Evarts. 837-2226. 573-9035 
Stark. Douglas O., Route 2, Bedford, 266-7189 
Starks, James L., P. O. Box 308, Mortons Gap, 258-5342 
Steenken. William R.. 1636 Highland Pike, Covington, 331-3789, 

431-3108 



765-6385, 765-4186 
763-2811. 247-9021 
Danville. 236-0144 



Stephens. Clarence W., Route 1, 
277-8797, 277-6116. ext. 396 



Higbee Mill Road, Lexington. 



Stethen. James E.. P. O. 
Stiff. Maurice E.. Jr 

454-7808. 586-2995 
Stikeleather, Clyde Lewis. P. O. Box 173, Leitchfield, 259-3885. 

259-3161 
Stinson. Charles L.. Bedford Court, Horse Cave, 786-2663 
Stokes, Robert K.. 2725 Hillview Drive, New Albany. Ind.. 

446-9014, 637-0411 
Stout. Robert C, 115 Woodlawn, Apt. 9. Versailles, 873-8264, 

873-5325 
Stovall, Tom, Box 73, Graham. 338-1773 
Strasburger, Charles R., Millwood, 879-6263, 597-2111 
Strathman, Richard A.. 3035 Rosedale. Louisville. 469-5361 
Stump, Phillip C. 130 Pin Oak, Lancaster, 792-3143, 792-3491 
Sullivan, Dan L.. Ludlow. 431-5949, 831-2990 
Switzer. Richard J., Jr.. 3 Circle Drive. Florence, 371-6037, 

581-0158 
Swope, Tom, 303 Dayton Pk.. Dayton. 441-6285 
Tapscott. Ozzie. 158 Mohawk Drive, Paducah, 444-7533 
Tarry, W. B. "Bud," Route 6, Glasgow. 678-2539 
Tarvin, Roger W., 13 Woodland, Fort Thomas. 441-1232. 341-7660 
Taylor. Ed, 435 N. 41st St.. Louisville. 772-0126, 684-6311 
Taylor, Frank. 1617 Rosemount Road, Portsmouth. Ohio, 

363-7174, 353-5143 
Taylor, Jesse, Route 2, 
Taylor, Ricky D., 504 

681-7946 
Terry, Bill V.. 134 College View Court. 
Thomas. Billy G.. 2333 Quinn Drive. 

366-9561, ext. 360 
Thompson. Houston, 513 E. 20th St., 

261-4425 
Thompson Kenneth E.. 619 Salisbury Road, Waverly. Ohio. 

947-6673, Portsmouth 353-3815 
Thompson, Thomas B.. Route 2. Box 156. Belle Center, Ohio. 

464-3410, 464-2751 
Thornton. Bryce C, 1115 Forest Court, Ashland, 325-3646, 

928-6414 
Thornton, Daniel A., 119 Stacker Drive, Clarksville. Tenn.. 

798-3098, 647-2234 
Tierney, Larry Wayne. Reynolds Station, 233-4028 
Tinsley. Marion F., Ash Street, Central Citv, 754-3608, 754-4870 
Toy. Donny S.. Route 1. Sharpsburg. 247-3211, 674-6381 
Tremaine. Darrell, Route 3. Berea. 986-4577 
Trent. William W., Hazel Green Academy, Hazel Green, 

662-9275. 662-4475 
Triplett. Herbert W., Route 1, Mt. Sterling, 498-2520, 233-2000. 

ext. 3492 
Tucker, Neal R.. 1712 Clarence Drive, Hopkinsville. 886-5492. 

886-4463 



Box 341. Middlesboro 

St. Joseph Lane, Covington. 291-9113, 



Morehead, 784-4295 
Louisville. 447-2815, 



Covington, 581-8594, 



T 
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AWARD BLANKETS AND TROPHIES 



SPECIAL MADE LEATHER SLEEVE 
JACKET 10 DAY DELIVERY 



Write or See Our Representative For Special Prices 





Select From 
SAND - BUREAN - DELONG 

All National Brands 



We Operate Our Own Lettering Dept, 
For Fast Delivery 




UTCLIFFE CO. 

BOX 959 LOUISVILLE, KY. 40201 



"^^ 



50 YEARS 
FOR ATHLETES 

la August, 1918, our founder, Bill Hunt, was asked to help secure some 
uaiforms for a football team so they c^uld tell the spectators from the 
players. 

For 50 years we at Hunt's have tried to serve the athletes by finding for 
them the best available equipment to serve their needs. 

Today we feature and can supply immediate delivery on merchandise for 
any athletic or physical education need from our warehouse. 

We h-ave complete stock of the following items. 

Football Shoes sizes 1 to 14 

Basketball Shoes sizes 1 to 17 

Football Pants sizes 22 to 52 

Football Jerseys sizes 4 to 50 

Football Shoulder Pads sizes Little League to 50 

Basketball Jerseys sizes 10 to 50 

Basketball Pants sizes Little League to College 

Athletic Socks sizes 6 to 16 

Football Helmets sizes Boys Extra Small to 8 

Football — Rubber or Leather — Littio League to Pro 

Basketballs — Indoor or Outdoor — Biddy to Pro 

Fair Play Scoreboards — Grade School to College 

First Aid for prevention or treatment 

We specialize in your problems. 

Next day delivery to any school in Kentucky. 

Call on our experience and service with your problems. 

In Mayfield, 247-1941 COLLECT, or LouisviUe 459-6366. 

One of us can help you. 

C. A. BYRN, Jr. — ROY BOYD — JIM MITCHELL 

WADE BURLESON — BILLIE FARMER — JENNY SIMPSON 

ELIZABETH RULE — NANNY LOU USERY — SONDRA POTTS 

HENRY BOMAR 

HUNTS ATHLETIC GOODS CO., Inc. 

CH 7-1941 — PHONES — CH 7-1942 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 



'!:*! 



B 



I 
i 





L 




r 



Hiqh School AthMe 



K.H.S.A.A AREA BASKETBALL REPRESENTATIVES 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Jerry Kimmel, Beechmont ; Roy Winchester, Betlilehem ; Goebel Ritter» 
Whitesburg ; Charlie Irwin, Hopkinsville ; Howard Gardner, EHzabethtown. Second Row : Bob Miller, 
Fort Thomas ; School Director Charlie Vettiner, Louisville ; Claude Ricketts, Louisville ; Rex Alexander, 
Murray; Hubert Louden, Louisville. Third Row: Bill Wise, Lexington; Bob Foster, Science Hill; E. B. 
M«y, Jr., Prestonsburg ; Ernie Cbattin, Ashland; Howard Rogers, Winchester; Joe Golden, Lynch. 








Official Brpn of tiie 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

November, 1968 




FILMS 



The films listed below are in the Film Library of the 
University of Kentucky College of Education. The code 
letters "e, j, s, c, a" refer to elementary, junior high, 
senior high, college and adult audiences who may enjoy 
the particular film listed. The rental prices shown d« 
not apply to schools which use one of the special sub- 
scription service plans offered by the Bureau of Audio- 
Visual Material. 

Basketball 

ASHLAND VS. ST. XAVIER (1962 K.H.S. BASKET- 
BALL TOURNAMENT FINALS), e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, 
silent, $1.00 

The Ashland Tomcats gave a valiant performance in 
trying to capture their second consecutive champion- 
ship but 'the Tigers of St. Xavier were the winners in the 
final game by 62-58. The Tigers were led by Mike SiUi- 
man and the Tomcats by Larry Conley. 
BALL HANDLING IN BASKETBALL, j-s-c, 1 reel, $2.00 
Teaches fundamentals of basketball handling includ- 
ing stance, grip, control, adjustment, before shooting, 
catching the ball, and other points. Presents game 
shocs, using special photographic techniques to illustrate 
principles. 
BASKETBALL BY RUPP, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $3.00 

Animated .play diagrams, slow motion photography, 
and action shot are combined in this new film prepared 
under the personal direction of iVIr. Rupp especially for 
coaohing use. Among thte driUs and plays covered in 
this film are: pivot man's slide into .the basket; Play 
No. 6, the famous Kentucky basket maker; legal screen- 
ing; penetration zone defense; and the Kentucky fast 
break. 

BASICETBALL FUNDAMENTALS — INDIVIDUAL 
TECHNIQUES, j-s-c^, VA reels, $2.50 
Branch McOracken, Indiana University basketball 
coach, used his team to demonstrate the fundamentals 
of basketball. Slow motion photography is used to break 
the various court techniques down into easily grasped 
essentials. 

BASKETBALL KENTUCKY STYLE, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, 
$3.00 (in state), $5.00 (out of state) 
Tliis is the revised edition of the fUm "Basketball by 
Rupp" prepared under the personal direction of Mr. 
Rupp especially for coaching use. 
BASKETBALL STRATEGY FOR GIRLS, j-s-c^, 1 reel, 
$2.00 

The basic sitrategy of offense play (fakes, roUs, cut- 
ting, screening, varying pace) and defense play (player 
to player, basic zone, shifting zone, triangle, and diago- 
nal) is demonstrated and explained in this film. 
BASKETBALL TECHNIQUES FOR GIRLS, j-s-c^, 1 
reel, $2.00 

Ba.5ic movement skills (running, starting, stopping, 
turning) -passing (finger control, movement with the 
pass, leading the receiver, choice of the right pass), 
catching (side pass, high pass), shooting (finger control, 
arm extension, wrist flip, dhoice of the right shot), 
dribbling, faking, and pivoting are demonstrated and 
explained in this film. 

BRECKINRIDGE COUNTY VS. COVINGTON HOLY 
CROSS (1965 Basketball Finals), e-j-s-c^, 3 reels, 
(40 min.), color, silent, $1.00 

The Breckinridge County High School team which 
reached the finals in 1964, returned to take the state 
championship title in 1965. Led by Butch Beard, they 
defeated Covington Holy Cross 95-73. 
CHAiVtPIONSHIP BASKETBALL — TEAM TECH- 
NIQUES, j-s, 1 reel, $2.00 

Man-to-man defense is shown, with the means best 
used under varying conditions. 



COVINGTON CATHOLIC VS. EARLINGTON (1967 Bas- 
ketball Finals), e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, (30 man.), color, 
silent, $1.00 

Earlington High School team won the tournament by 
defeating the Covington Catholic Colonels 54-53, by 
scoring a field goal in the last second of the final game. 
The winners eliminated RusseU, Atherton, and Breathitt 
County to reach the finals. 

DEFENSIVE FOOTWORK IN BASKETBALL, j-s-c-a, 
1 reel, $2.00 

Striding with an opponent, checking, maneuvering 
him out of position and other basic skiUs are illustrated, 
using special photography to demonstrate paints. Re- 
bounding, pivoting, and correlated arm action are taught 
also. 

KNOW YOUR BASKETBALL, j-s-c-a, 3 reels (33 min.), 
color, $1.00 

Provides a thorough examination of the rules and 
present guidelines that will aid the fans as well as offi- 
cials, coaches and players in a better understanding of 
those difficult judgment decisions that are constantly 
occurring on the basketball court. 

LOUISVILLE MALE VS. SHELBY COUNTY (1966 Bas- 
ketball Finals), e-j-s-c-^, 3 reels (30 min.), color, 
silent, $1.00 
In the action-packed final game of the state high 
school tournament the Rockets of Shelby County won 
the state championship as the Bulldogs of Louisville 
Male were defeated by the score of 62-57 in Freedom 
Hall at Louisville. 

MONTICELLO VS. FLAGET (1960 K.H.S.A.A. STATE 
BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT FINALS), e-j-s-c-a, 2 
reels, color, silent, $1.00 

Flaget High School of Louisville defeated MonticeUo 
High School in the final game of the tournament to win 
the .dhampionship. The Braves came from behind in the 
last half to overtake the Trojans and win by a score of 
65-56. 

NORTH MARSHALL VS. DUPONT MANUAL (1959) 
K.H.S. BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT FINALS, 
e-j-is-c-a, 3 reels, silent, $1.00 

The Indians of North Marshall High School proved 
too much for the Reds of duPont Mauiual in the final 
game, winning by a score of 64-63. All-State players 
Doyle and Lampley were best for the winners, while 
Melear and Siers let the Reds. 

OFFICIAL BASKETBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels (40 min.), 
color, $1.00 

Demonstrates the official rules interpretations cover- 
ing screening, traveling, jump ball, front and back court 
th^row-ms, free throws, personal and technical fouls, 
rebounding, and unusual and often misunderstood play 
situations. 

RUPP'S FUNDAMENTALS OF BASKETBALL, j-s-e^a, 
1 reel (11 mins.), silent, $1.25 
Coach Rupp's University of Kentucky Wildcats (1949- 
50) demonstrate ten different plays. 
RUPP'S PARADE TO THE NATIONAL CHAMPION- 
SHIP of 1958, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, $4.50 
This film presents tlie highlights of aU the games, 
both regular season and tourrament games, which led 
up to the U of K's Wildcats winning the NCAA basket- 
ball crown. 

SENECA VS. BRECKINRIDGE COUNTY (1964 Basket- 
ball Finals), e-j-s-Cna, 3 reels (40 mins.), color, sUent, 
$1.00 

Seneca Higih School won the state championship for 
the second straight year by defeating Breckinridge 
County by the score of 66-56. 

SENECA VS. GLASGOW (1968 Basketball Finals), 
e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, (33 min.), color, silent, $1.00 

The Scotties were not to be denied the championship 

as they eliminated three of the strongest teams in the 

tournament for tihe right to meet Seneca in the finai 

game. The Indians lost to Glasgow by a score of 77-68. 

(Continued on Page Nine) 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL, XXXI— NO, 4 



NOVEMBER, 1968 



51.00 Per Year 



The Coach in Time of Crisis 

By Supt. Frank Dick 
Toledo (Ohio) Public Schools 

In present day society, life becomes more compli- 
cated and competitive every day. Therefore, it is diffi- 
cult for the young person to find his niche. 

The high school coadh has an excellent opportunity to 
influence ithe young people under his jurisdiotion, to 
guide them toward finding goals and being able to com- 
pete in life's work. 

To be competitive in today's world, one must be self- 
controlled in a crisis. Wihat better way can a young 
man learn this lesson than in the spirit of varsJJty com- 
petitiDn where he learns to play the game as it should be 
played? 

Nothing teaches alertness and discipline as well as 
the actual competition of the game on tiie athletic field. 
Young athletes learn how to compete. They come to 
know that every game in life hajs rules which must be 
followed. They leaim to give all they have to win, and 
to take defeat with the same grace with which they 
earn victory. 

All this, in competition, comes under the scrutiny of 
an audience which sometimes can be critical and even 
hostile. 

It is the actual staging of the game which gives the 
coach his shining hour. All ithe preparation that goes 
into the game plan, no matter how carefully detailed, 
can be useless if the boys are not disciplined on the 
field. 

Even discipline on the bench is important. The coach 
should tove his scfuad so well organized that he knows 
instantiy where each one of his men is placed. Substi- 
tutes, who go into and out of the game, sljould be in one 
section of the bench; specialists should be in another 
section; and first line substitutes or replacements in still 
another section. Even the team doctor with the trainer 
should be assigned a definite area. 

Discipline on the bench goes hand-in-hand with the 
coach's own example of self-eontrol at the game. No 
matter how well organized a coach may be during the 
week, if he is not well organized at critical moments 
during the game, not only may he lose the game by not 
being prepared for a splitnsecond decision, but his dem- 
onstration of crowd control can become a foolish 
travesty. 

He is responsible for the attitude of his team on the 
bench, the discipline of his squad on the field, his 
players' reactions to the referees, and the immediate 
post-game control of those under his jurisdiction. 

Managers and assistant coaches also must play a 
key role in overall control. This becomes doubly impor- 
tant in today's society, where a disciplined team can 
be a great lesson for both students and adults. 

The responsibility for much of the student body's 
attitude, in our opinion, lies with the high school princi- 
pal, while the athletic director should be well schooled 
in principles of crowd control. The athletic director must 
know how to di'ScipMne the student body, how to keep 
students in their places in the stands and prevented from 
running all over the stadium. 



The athletic director should not necessarily have a 
get-tough attitude, but he must be able to secure ample 
police control, have the police follow crowds from the 
stadium, and be able to dispatch police to trouble sixxts 
in and around the stadium before, during, and at the 
end of the game. 

Spectators should definitely be kept off the sidelines. 
Booster club members, wearing arm bands or other 
identification to bolster the poUce and school officials, 
are helping in overall crowd control. 

The school principal should teach sportsmanship, be 
responsible for the student body's attitude at assem- 
blies, and build up good student behavior at games. 
The school public address system should be used, not 
abused. Whenever possible, the principal should secure 
speakers from among community leaders to teach good 
sportsmanship to the entire student body. 

In a time of crisis, the coach is definitely coaching 
more than his team. He has a responsibiUty not only to 
his athletes, but to the student body, to his administra- 
tion, and to the entire community in which he lives. 

"The spirit of varsity competition is one of the great 
things in our American society. While physical facifities 
at a given institution may be the greatest, it is the man 
who is honored with the name of coach who ties the 
whole thing together. A well-controlled coach in a cow 
pasture is better for society than a dubiously dedicated 
coach with the greatest college team in the country. 
—Athletic Journal and Ohio H. S. Athlete 



National Federation Basketball Test 

Part II of the National Federation basketball exami- 
nation will be given all over Kentucky on Monday, 
December 2, to officials who wish to work for the 
Approved and Certified ratings. Officials registered with 
the K.H.S.A.A. for the first time this year and who have 
not been registered previously in any other state asso- 
ciation, are not eligible to take the test. Tliose inter- 
ested should advise the State Office immediately in 
order that necessary arrangements can be made with 
ithe school administrators who will supervise the taking 
of the exam. Officials fiving in Kentucky need not 
suggest the name of an examiner. The Approved rating 
does not carry forward from year to year, but must be 
earned each year. 

Football Hall of Fame 

George E. Mercker, 803 Republic Building, Loufeville, 
heads a committee which will select the outstanding 
scholar athletes for Kentucky. The winner of the 1968 
contest will be presented -an appropriate award given 
by the National Football Foundation. Mr. Mercker 
writes: "Since this is to be a candidate who is both a 
student and an athlete, a boy's academic record and 
his performance on specified college board tests will be 
some of the factors considered by the panel for its selec- 
tion. The fact that he also must be considered an out- 
standing football player is automatically understood. 
Of course, awards won as a football player will be con- 
sidered also. Other factors taken into consideration 
will be good moral character, leadership ability and ' 
other school related activities in which the boy partici- 
pates." Administrators and coaches should send their 
nominations to Mr. Mercker. 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1968 



NOVEMBER, 1968 



VOL. XXXI— NO. 4 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

Hi^h School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington. Ky. 40501 

Second class postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 

BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Preston Holland (1965-69), Murray 

Vice-President Ralph C. Dorsey (1966-70). Horse Cave 

Directors — W. H. Crowdus (1968-71), Franklin; Morton Combs 
(1968-72). Carr Creek: Don Davis (1967-71). Independence; 
James T. Dotson (1968-72), Johns Creek; Don R. Rawlings 
(1965-69). Danville; Foster J. Sanders (1966-70), Louisville. 
Subscription Rate $1.00 per Year 



^lom the Comfnissione>i s Dffi 



ice 



REPORTS SOON DUE 

1. 1968 Football Participation List 

2. School's Report on Football Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Football) 



Approved and Certified Officials 

Clyde E. Allen, Jr., has qualified as an Approved 
official. James H. Mooneyhan and Thomas R. NotwckxI 
have qualified as Certified offidals. 

Future Football Districts and Regions 

The future football districts and regions for 1969 and 
1970 in Classes AA and A are as follows: 

Class AAA 
REGION I 

Atherton, Bishop David. Central, DeSales, duPont Manual, 
Flaget, Iroauois. Male, Shawnee. St. Xavier, Trinity 

REGION II 

District 1 — 

Butler, Doss, Fairdale, Pleasure Ridge Park, Southern, Val- 
ley, Western 
District 2 — 

Durrett. Eastern, Fern Creek. Jeffersontown, Seneca, Thom- 
as Jefferson, Waggener, Westport 

Class AA 

REGION I 

District 1 — 

Bowling Green, Caldwell County, Christian County, Franklin- 
Simpson. Hopkinsville, Lone Oak, Mayfield, Paducah 
District 2 — 

Daviess County, Henderson. Henderson County, Madisonville, 
Ohio County, Owensboro. Owensboro Catholic, Union County 

REGION II 

District 1 — 

Breckinridge County, Elizabethtown, Fort Knox, LaRue 
County. Meade County, North Hardin, Oldham County, Old 
Kentucky Home, Shelby County, Shepherdsville 
District 2 — 

Danville, Henry Clay, Jessamine County, Lafayette, Somerset, 
Woodford County 

REGION III 

District 1 — 

Boone County. Boyd County. Campbell County, Covington 
Catholic, Dixie Heights. Highlands, Holmes, Lloyd Memorial, 
Newport, Newport Catholic, Paul G. Blazer, Russell, Simon- 
Kenton 
District 2 — 

Bourbon County, Bryan Station. Franklin County, George 
Rogei-3 Clark, Harrison County. Madison Central, Tates Creek 

REGION IV 

District 1 — 

Bell County, Corbin. Cumberland. Evarts, James A. Cawood, 
Knox Central. Middlesboro, Russell County, Wayne County, 
WhHley County 

District 2 — 

Belfi-y, Hazard. Leslie County, M. C. Napier, Prestonsburg, 
Whitesburg 



Class A 
REGION I 

District 1 — 

Crittenden County, Fort Campbell, Fulton, Fulton County, 
Murray, North Marshall. Russeilville, Todd Central, Trigg 
County 
District 2 — 

Allen County, Butler County, Campbellsville, Caverna, Cum- 
berland County, Glasgow, Greensburg, Metcalfe County, North 
Warren, Tompkinsville, Warren Central 

REGION II 

District 1 — 

Bardstown, Eminence, Henry County, Kentucky Military 
Institute, Lebanon, Louisville Country Day, Shelbyville, Wash- 
ington County 
District 2 — 

Anderson. Berea, Boyle County, Burgin, Frankfort, Garrard 
County. Georgetown, Harrodsburg, Ktntucky School for the 
Deaf, Madison, Mercer County, Sayre, Scott County, Stanford 

REGION III 

District 1 — 

Beechwood. Bellevue, Carroll County, Catlettsburg, Dayton, 
Ludlow, McKell, Owen County, Eaceland, Wurtland 
District 2 — 

Bath County. Fle-ning County. Lewis County. Maysville, 
Millersburg Military Institute, Montgomei-y County, Mt. Ster- 
ling. Nicholas County, Paris. Rowan County 

REGION IV 

District 1 — 

Harlan, Hazel Green Lily, London, Lynch, Lynn Camp, 
Mt. Vernon, Pineville, Williamsburg 
District 2 — 

Elkho-n City, Fleming-Neon, Jenkins. Johns Creek, Louisa, 
Morgan County, Mullins, Paintsville, Pikeville, Virgie, Wheel- 
wright 



Minutes of Board Meeting 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky High School 
Athletic Association met at the Ramada Inn, Lexington, 
on Saturday morning, October 12, 1968. The meeting was 
called to order by Vice-President Ralph C. Dorsey at 
11:00, with Morton Combs, Don Davis, James T. Dotson, 
E>on R. Rawlings, and Foster J. Sanders; Commissioner 
Theo. A. Sanford and Assistant Commissioner J. B. 
Mansfield present. The invocation was given by James 
T. Dotson. 

Don R. Rawlings moved, seconded by James T. 
Dotson, that the reading of the minutes of the August 
10th meeting be waived, since the members of the Board 
had received copies of these minutes. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

Ralpli C. Dorsey announced' the appointment of the 
following committees for 1968-69, which had been made 
by President Holland: 

Personnel and Policy— Chairman Ralph C. Dorsey, 
Don R. Rawlings, Foster J. Sanders. (The President and 
the Commissioner are ex-officio members of this com- 
mittee.) 

Building — Chairman Morton Combs, Don Davis, 
James T. Dotson. (The President and the Commission- 
er are ex-officio members of this committee). 

Trophy — Chairman Alvin Almond, Theo. A. Sanford, 
J. B. Mansfield. (The President is an ex-officio member 
of this committee.) 

Swimming — Chairman Alfred M. Reece (Lexington), 
Mrs. Wilbur Bell (Cynthiana), Greg Bobrow (LouisviOe), 
E. W. Craik (Louisville), Don Davis (Independence), 
Miss Sheila Gilreath (Ashland), Rev. Richard Grenough 
(Louisville), Edgar McNabb (Fort Mitchell), Jack 
Thompson (Louisville), Miss Dot Kirkpatrick (Rich- 
mond). 

WrestMng — (Thairm'an Orville WiUiams (Louisville), 
Jerry Abney (Alexandria), Jerry Boyd (Danville), Will 
D. Evans (Louisville), Marshall Patterson (Fort Camp- 
bell), Vince Semary (Louisville), Robert Weenolsen 
(Louisville), Bro. Joseph Wilhelm (Newport). 

Gymnastics — Cliairman Bernard Johnson (Lexing- 
ton), Dr. Barney Groves (Richmond), George Jefferson 
(LouisviUe), Herb Lewis (LouisvUle), Thomas E. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1968 



Page Three 



Mahanes (Lexington), Mrs. Bonnie Rowe (Louisville), 
Bob Wason (Louisville). 

The Commissioner reported the referendum results 
on Uhe two proposals which had been submitted recently 
to principals of K.H.S.A.A. member schools. They were 
as follows: 

Proposal I, making certain changes in the possible 
terms of appointments for Association executives, in- 
cluding an optional retirement plan, 223 YES, 14 NO. 

Proposal II, giving the Board of Control authority to 
amend the playing rules for any sport sponsored by the 
Association, 201 YES, 36 NO. 

The Commissioner, with the Board now having au- 
thority given in Proposal II, recommended that Basket- 
ball Rule 1-14 be deleted and that the following be 
substituted: 

"It is recommended that both players' benches be 
placed along that side of the court on wliich the scor- 
ers' table is located. Placing the players' benches out- 
side the end lines should be discouraged." Eton R. 
Rawhngs moved, seconded by Don Davis, that the rec- 
ommendation of the Commissioner be accepted and that 
the rule mentioned be changed accordingly. The motion 
was carried unanimously. 

There was a discussion concerning certain needed 
changes in the Football Playoffs regulations. 

The Conmiissioner recommended that, for the foot- 
ball seasons of 1969 and 1970, 485 be substituted for 475 
in I-A-2 and I-A-3; that I-C be amended accordingly, with 
enrollments based on the 1967-68 figures. He asked 
Assistant Commissioner Mansfield to present the rec- 
ommended classes, districts, and regions for 1969 and 
1970, based on the enrollment figure mentioned. Morton 
Combs moved, seconded by Don R. Rawlings, that the 
recommendations of the Commissioner and Assistant 
Commissioner be accepted and made a part of the foot- 
ball regulations. The motion was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner stated 'that he had scheduled ten- 
tatively the Class AAA Football Finals to be played in 
Louisville on November 22, and the Classes A and AA 
Football Finals to be played in Lexington on November 
29. Eton Davis moved, seconded by James T. Dotson, 
that the schedule of the football playoff games, made by 
the Commissioner, be approved by the Board. The mo- 
tion was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner stated that it is also probable that 
he wiU have two sections of the State Goli Tournament 
in 1969, one a team tournament and the other a tourna- 
ment for individuals. The members of the Board thought 
that the plan had merit. 

The Commissioner stated that interest in Girls' Track 
is now great enough for him to assign teams in this 
sport to two classes in 1969, AAA and AA. 

The Commissioner stated that 'two school men are 
currently in the race to represent Section 2 for member- 
ship on the Board of Control. They are Supt. DarreU 
Carter of the Monroe County Schools and Prin. W. H. 
"Johnie" Crowdus of the Franklin-Simpson Junior High 
School. 

The Board set the date of Etocember 21, 1968, for its 
next meeting. 

Foster J. Sanders moved, seconded by James T. 
Dotson, that all bills of the Association beginning August 
1, 1968, and ending September 30, 1968, be allowed. The 
motion was carried unanimously. 

There being no further business, the meeting ad- 
journed. 



In Memoriam 




Lewis Baker 

Lewis Baker, 42, Superintendent of Union County 
Schools, died on September 28, 1968, at the Community 
Methodist Hospital in Henderson where he had been a 
patient for two weeks. 

Mr. Baker was bom in Clay, Kentucky, the son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Baker of Pride. He was a 1944 
graduate of the Clay High School, entering the Navy 
under the officer training program in July of that year. 
He attended Miami and Oberlin colleges in Ohio where 
he took part in Vcirsity basketball and track. He received 
degrees from Western State University and George 
Peabody College. 

A coach and athletic director and an assistant prin- 
cipal in the Henderson County school system from 1951 
to 1955, Mr. Baker was a former president of the Hen- 
derson County Teachers' Association. He was Superin- 
tendent of iScottsviUe City Schools during the 1955-60 
period. He had been Superintendent of Union County 
Schools since 1960. 

Mr. Baker was a member of the First Baptist Church 
of Morganfield, the Masonic Lodge at Scottsville, the 
Union County Fish and Game Club of which he was a 
former president, the American Legion, and the Veter- 
ans of Foreign Wars. His name appeared in the 1967 
edition of Outstanding Personalities of the South. 

Survivors are his wife, Mrs. Marianne Baker; 
daughters, Debbie and Terri Lou, and son, Daniel Clay, 
all at home; his parents, of Pride; a sister, Mrs. Ruby 
Jean Heady of Pride; and brothers, James of Tecum- 
seh, Mich., Luther of Allen Park, Mich., and Robert of 
Kingsport, Term. 

Radio Station WMSK gave a moving tribute to Mr. 
Baker on September 30. Excerpts are: 

It is not this station's poUcy to eulogize anyone. To 
do this would in a sense be showing favoritism, but in 
this particular instance we feel that all the residents of 
Union County will share with us the heartfelt loss we 
have this morning. Saturday the Death Angel took from 
our midst a man; a family man; a well educated man; 
a man who loved life, wlio worshiped his family, and a 
man who was truly interested in all -the children in this 
county. ... He worked day and night. He talked to his 
friends. He toured the county talking to voters and he 
accomplished what some said would never happen, he 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1968 



consolidaled the Morganfield and Sturgis high schools 
and built a three and half million dollar plant on High- 
way 60. . . . The many trips to areas to push for help in 
the county, the trips to the State capitol to argue a point 
with a particular department, the hours spent at his 
desk at the courthouse, we will never know how many. 
But this we do know, Lewis Baker was a school man. 
He leaves behind a school system that did not just 
happen. Lewis Baker made it happen. He planned it 
that way. He made up his mind and he worked untU he 
saw his dream come true. . . . Lewis was a young man, 
a family man, and we again go through all the reasons 
Lewis Baker should have lived, but we can not question 
the reason he died. We can only be thankful that he 
lived. And ithis morning we would like to say to all of 
you, "Give thanks because Lewis Baker did pass this 
way." 

KAPOS NEWS 

1968 Scholarship Awarded 

Miss Robina M. BecKer, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
John H. Becker, Jr., has won the 1968 $500 educational 
scholarsiiip awarded by the Kentucky Association of 
Pep Organization Sponsors. "Robin" is a graduate of 
duPont Manual High School where she was a member 
of the National Honor Society, Student Council, Great 
Books Club, Advanced Honor Roll Club and the Drama 
Club. Some of her honors include selection to the 
Stewart's Teen Board, Most Popular Girl in her Senior 
Class, a Miss Manual Finalist, a member of the Home- 
coming Queen Court, and the Courier-Journal "Sweet- 
heart of tihe Week." The selection is based on: scholar- 
ship, citizeriship and need for financial assistance. 
"Robin" had an academic ranking of 16 in a class of 
393. She has enrolled at the University of Kentucky 
where she plans to major in social work. 

Mrs. Joanna Conover, Robin's high school cheerlead- 
er sponsor, predicts a very successful college career for 
Robin. Our first report on Robin's college activities is in 
the area of oheerleading. While she did not make it as 
one of four freshman cheerleaders selected, she was one 
of the ten finalists. Since the tryouts I have talked with 
Robin twice and she is enthusiastic about every phase 
of her first month of being a college freshman. As I 
receive news of any of our scholarship recipients, you 
wiU be informed through this magazine or the K.A.P.O.S. 
newsletters. 
Your Dues Make Scholarships Possible 

To date K.A.P.O.S. has given $2,500 for scholar^iK. 
Our main sources of revenue are your $2 membership 
fee and the one-day Cheerleader clinics. Because there 
are so many summer clinics available and we have had 
such difficulty in obtaining a teaching staff, it was felt 
that we could eliminate this year's one-day clinics. 
However, tiiis means that we wUl need 100 percent 
paid-up membership if we hope to continue our scholar- 
ship program, etc. 
State-at-Large and State-Tournament Championships 

With the enthusiastic response given to the State-at- 
Large Championship, it is reasonable to assume that we 
will have greater participation (this second year. And, 
while this reminder is not to be construed as a "threat," 
you are entitled to be reminded that the school must be 
a paid-up member of KAPOS in order to be eligible for 
■competition in either of ithe two events, State-at-Large 
and State Tournament! DUES MUST BE PAID BY 
DISTRICT TOURNAMENT DATE. . . . Your revised 
constitution states that tthe fiscal year shaU be from 
September 1 through August 31. This means that aU 
dues should be paid in September and by district tourna- 
ment time if you plan on entering the competition for 
outstanding cheerleader squad. However, your member- 
ship is welcomed at any month of the fiscal year. 




SCHOLARSHIP WINNER— Miss Robin Becker (front) receives 
a $500 scholarship award from KAPOS. Attending the award 
luncheon were (left to rig'it) Mrs. Joanna Conover sponsor 
duPont Manual Higrh School, Louisville; Miss Jane Meyer, 
KAPOS, president ; and Mrs. John Becker, mother of the 
scholarship recipient. 

Summer Sponsors Meeting 

Those sponsors attending the summer cheerieading 
chnic met on August 8, 1968, on the University of Ken- 
tucky campus. Miss Jane Meyer, ShelbyvJle High 
School, presided over :the meeting. IVIr. Bob Wason, 
representing the Nissen Company, distributed materials 
on tumbling mats and trampolines. We appreciate the 
time that Mr. Wason gave in remaining until the end of 
our meeting so that he could give individual attention 
to each sponsor. 

The beautiful silver bowl that was presented to Mrs. 
Stella S. Gilb at the state tournament was on display, 
and Mis. Gloria Compton read a letter frc«m Mrs. Gilb 
thanking the association for the honor bestowed upon 
her. 

Within the next few days you should receive the 
Newsletter and the membership card. Some of the rec- 
ommendations and details of the summer meeting wiU 
be covered in the Newsletter. Also, you wiU find the list 
of names of those sponsors who paid their dues at the 
summer meeting. 

Three New Board Members to 8e Elected 

A ballot wiU be sent to you along with the Newslet- 
ter. If you know of someone whose name does not ap- 
pear here that you feel would make a good board mem- 
ber, won't you drop Jane Meyer a oard so thajt she can 
contact this person. The following names have been 
submitted for consideration as new board members: 

Jane Graham (Bourbon County), Bobbie Branimer 
(Fairdale), Joanna Conover (duPont Manual), Pat Eu- 
bank (Owensboro), Deane Gaunce (Lewis County), Ann 
Holland (Henry County), Nancy Carr (Central Gty), 
Cheryl Thomas (Pleasure Ridge), Leah Tackett (Mul- 
lins), Mary Ann Powell (Boyle County), Ann Walker 
(Paducah), Joanne Fox (Greenville), Opal Patterson 
(iVEddlesboro) , Pat Scott (Woodford County), Sally 
Meng (Bellevue High). 

SteUa S. Gilb 
Secretary-Treasurer, KAPOS 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1968 



Page Five 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled October 25) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it ia 
the home phone unless otherwise designated. If two numbers 
are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Abney, Bob, 342 Stratford Drive, Lexington, 277-4706, 266-0115 
Adams, Richard W., 20 Bartlett Ave., Madisonville, 821-1381, 

821-5246 
Adams, William M., Letcher, 633-7787, 633-7787 
Adair. Lewis C, 5307 Lost Trail, Louisville, 361-2775. 774-7434 
Alderson. Edward Lee, Route 5, Franklin, 586-3231 (Bus.) 
Allen. James Franklin. Garden Street. Harlan, 573-1595, 

673-4510 
Allen, J. Mack, Route 1, Box 4, Ashland, 325-8328, Huntington, 

W. Va., 625-7788 
Allen, Nelson Robert, 113 Gesling Road, Kenwood, Russell, 

836-5352 
Allen, Yvon, P. O. Box 96. Ary. Dwarf 2262 
Allison. Larry J.. Route 3, Carlisle, 289-2971 
Archibald, Larry T., 216 Riverside Drive, Augusta, 756-3882 
Arflin, Tracy T., Route 1, Box 93. Princeton, 365-5644 
Asher, Ralph, Woods.de, Olive Hill, 286-4537, 286-2081 
Atwell, Darryl R., 501 Sexton Court, Campbellsville, 465-6877, 

465-8736 
Bailey, Harrison, P. O. Box 25. Vicco. 476-2774 
Baker, Billy B., 117 Keeney. Somerset, 679-1449, 679-1121 
Baker. Phillip R.. Route 2. Box 255, Somei-set, 679-3172 
Basham, James, 223 Elm St.. Cloverport, 788-3903 
Beck. Richard E.. 1012 Nacland Lane. Jeffersonville, Ind., 

765-2785. 282-7821 
Belcher, William J., Anderson St., Crofton 
Bentley, James. P. O. Box 89, Jenkins 
Berger, John D., Jr., Locust Hill, Waynesboro, Va., 942-1422, 

942-4241 
Bertsch, Ronald L.. 65 Geiger, Bellevue, 581-5790 
Biter, Charles D., 6602 Moorhaven Drive, Louisville, 239-3580, 

454-7511 
Black, Willis L., 407 Tenth St.. Corbin. 528-3393 
Blakeley, Ronald D.. 1102 College Court, Murray, 762-2549 
Blankenship, Randy, P. O. Box 28. Stanville. 478-6981 
Bottoms. Bruce. Willisburg 

Bowlilng. Donald E.. 503 Scott Ave.. Pikeville, 437-7243 
Branham. Mason. Jr.. Box 1. Grahn 
Branstetter. Elwood. 115 Kathleen, Horse Cave 
Brant, Bernard, 2309 Fairview, Madisonville. 821-8638, 821-7156 
Brashears, Malcolm W., 11 Fannin Court, Frankfort, 227-7932, 

227-9023 
Brewer, Kenneth J.. P. O. Box 123. Campton. 668-6556 
Bridges, Ralph, 2424 Anne Ave., Henderson, 826-4088 
Brock, Johnnie G.. Star Route, Jensen. 337-3752 
Brock. Lavone E., Kettle Island. 337-3271, 337-3271 
Bromagen, Michael Dale, Route 2. Owingsville, 674-5592 
Browder, Homer Lee, 405 Fair, Henderson. 826-2123. 827-6621 
Bruce, James E., P. O. Box 144. Drakesboro. 476-2401. 754-1630 
Burgess, Jacky, 207 Henson Lane, Barbourville, 546-3439 
Burkett, Garvis Gene, Route 1. Box 65A. Nancy, 871-3086, 

678-4942 
Butcher, Granville "Bo," Williamsport, 789-5553 
Byron. Lou, Jr.. 613 Pine St.. Louisville. 685-4424 
Campbell, John. Jr.. P. O. Box 68. Garrett. 358-3061, 368-3461 
Campbell, Joseph Earl, Box 146, Cave City. 773-2831 
Carr. Gene P., P. O. Box 964, Ashland. 836-8736 
Carrico. Tommy. 1305 Vine. Murray. 753-7737, 753-9061 
Carroll, Joe E., Falcon, 349-3362. 349-3312 
Carter. Jack Thomas, P. O. Box 6. Bulan, 436-4035 
Cavil. Leonard J.. 610 E. Maple. Nicholasville. 885-4182 (Bus.) 
Cavitt, Charles E.. Jr.. Route 3. Benton. 527-8479 
Chaney, Leroy Michael, Pine Knot, 354-4321 
Childers, Charles L.. P. O. Box 1. Holbrook Hall. Morehead, 

784-7656 
Cleavenger. Ed. Route 1. Box 8. Morganfield. 389-2684. 

389-2419. Ext. 562 
Collins. Mason, Route 2, Maysville, 769-7614 
Combs, Franklin D.. P. O. Box 432. Frankfort. Lawreneeburg. 

839-6603. 564-3040 
Conley. Connie B.. 1237 Stafford, Paintsville, 789-6449. 789-5273 
Cooper, John F., 512 E. 3rd. Augusta. 766-3176, 766-3001 
Correll, Elmer Eugene, P. O. Box 434. Millei-sburg. 987-2292 
Cosby, Carel A.. 568 Magie Ave., Hamilton. Ohio. 895-7289, 

Middletown, 423-4491 
Cox, Colin Kelly. Route 2. Box 11. Hazard. 436-5963. 436-3711 
Cox, Rufus A., Route 4, Madisonville. 821-2692. 821-4850 
Crager. Bobby F., University Breckinridge. Morehead, 784-9462, 

784-4181, ext. 245 
Creekmore. Milford Burl. P. O. Box 368, Pine Knot, 364-4082 
Croft, Lewis. Box 42. Crofton, 424-5160. 424-5160 
Crowe, William Michael. Maine, Stanton 
Curley, Tom, 4501 S. Sixth St., Apt. 27. Louisville. 366-4228, 

582-2613 
Daopoulos. James A., Box 313, Kirwan Towers. Lexington, 

EX 8-6741 
Davis. Archie Charles. Alumni Tower, Box 806. Morehead 
Dawson, Ray R., P. O. Box 514 Stearns, 376-2154 
Decker, Dennis Lee, 60 Tower Hill, Fort Thomas, 441-7434, 

441-8393 



Dennison, James E.. 1825 James David Court, Owensboro, 

684-7573, 684-7251 
Dobson, Kenneth, Babbland Drive, Paducah, 898-3756 
Doom, Bobby W., 2209 Greenbrier, Henderson, VA 6-8630, 

VA 6-9022 
Driver, Bob, 306 East Main, Glasgow, 651-3841. 651-8761 
Duggins, Michael, 10 Patricia St., Florence, 371-8982, 371-8656 
Dyke, Orville Dean, Box 231, Crestwood, 241-4109, 454-7511 

ext. 3874 
Eades, James M., South Carrollton, 754-2689, 754-2689 
Eades. Norman W.. 1711 Raleigh Road. Lexington. 299-2G66, 

265-5661, ext. 259 
Edwards, Don A., 119 E. Main. Sebree, 835-7537 
Ellington, James E., 3521 Cherry Tree Lane- Erlanger, 341-8107, 

681-7946 
Elmore, Jimmy A.. Route 1, Brandenburg, 422-2465. 422-3214 
Embry. James, 8310 Delido Road, Louisville, 964-5193, 684-1341, 

ext. 226 
Embry. Johnny, Cloverport, 788-6497 

England, Stan, 317 Main, Bowling Green, 3-1068, 3-1068 
Estes, Walter R., 2548 Citation Ave., Owensboro, 683-1808, 

684-9813 
Evans, Clark, Route 2, Box 27B, Ashland. 325-4972 
Ewers, Michael, 710 Scott Ave., Pikeville, 432-2508, 432-2508 
Farmer, Jack, 113 Rolling Hills, Box 8, 'Danville, 236-3192, 

236-2711 
Fittzgerald. Oscar L.. P. O. Box 321, Burnside, 561-4881, 

561-9496 
Flinchum, Paul, 120 Brockton, Eastern Kentucky University, 

Richmond 
Fox, Kenneth, P. O. Box 401. South Shore. 932-4267, 932-3323 
Francis, William Lewis, 8909 Brandywyne, Fern Creek, 

239-8460, 452-3722 
Fritz, Sherman, 122 Meadowlark Drive, Richmond. 623-4966, 

623-3424 
Fugate, Don, Rowdy, 436-2600 (Bus.) 

Fuller. Terry Ralph, 58 S. Scott. Madisonville. 821-8612. 338-4200 
Gaines. Curtis, 1514 Young, Henderson, VA 6-9933, VA 7-3537 
Gaither. Gene, P. O. Bor 103, Beaver Dam, 274-3885, 274-4905 
Gamble. Jerry, 506 Main, Dawson Springs, 797-2543, 797-3811 
Garland, Danny, 126 E. Second St.. Frankfort, 223-8608 
Garmon. James R.. Jr., Little Renox Route, Burkesville 
Gay, David W.. 115 Hill n' Dale, Lancaster, 792-2870, 2332000, 

ext. 3801 
Gibson, Lowell D., Sassafras, 476-2924 

Gilbert, Cebert, Jr.. Breck nr'dge. Box 136, Stanton, 663-2298 
Goatley, Greg. Perryville Road, Springfield. 336-3565, 336-3810 
Goff, Reathel. Hardyville, 528-2871, 524-9341 
Coins, Edgar S., Dir's Apt.. Keen Hall, Western Ky. Univer- 
sity. Bowling Green, 745-2198, 745-5152 
Goines, Homer, Jersey Ridge, Maysville, 664-6478 
Cover, Luid J., P. O. Box 124, Science Hill. 423-2274, 678-8183 
Grace, Garland Ray, 116 Johnston, Hopkinsville. 886-1469 
Graham, James, 2569 Bradley Drive. Ashland. 324-8169, 

324-1155, ext. 376 
Graves, Preston Howard, Marrowbone, 864-3604, 661-5919 
Gray. Raymond, Livermore. 278-2615 
Griffith, Millard, 143 North St.. Southgate. 441-6746 
Griffin. Charles D., 233 Garr. Flemingsburg. 846-9921 
Halbert, Hubert, Langley, BU 6-3746 

Hammons, Norman, Route 4, Hopkinsville, 886-7066, 886-3311 
Hardin, Carl Ray. 34 Calumet Drive, Southland Mobile Manor, 

Louisville. 366-8923, 366-9611, ext. 279 
Hardin, Don G.. P. O. Box 88. Morehead, 784-7698 
Harned, Delano D., Custer, 53ff-2301 
Harned. Vic, Leitchfield. 2.59-4149- 451-5010 
Harris, Billy, P. O. Box 97. Cleaton. 754-4410. 754-1,630 
Harris. Wayne. Route 2. Somerset, 678-2184, 678-8166 
Harrison, Timothy L.. Drakesboro, 476-2434 
Hawkins, Don. Route 1. Ekron 

Hayes. Charles David. P. O. Box 37, Mousie, 946-2126 
Hayes, James V^'entine, 8207 Westray Lane, Louisville, 

969-1920. 637-4761 
Hayes, Larry, 200 E. Maxwell, Apt. 9, Lexington. 785-6731 
Henderson- Austin. 2603 Villa Maria Drive. Villa Hills, 341-6129, 

431-0900 
Henson, Tony C. Route 6. Mayfield, 658-3126, 443-1165 
Higgins, James M., Garrs Lane, Apt. 201, Louisville. 936-1345 

(Bus.) 

Hills. Marshall L.. P. O. Box 433, Morningview, 356-9687, 

356-5050 
Hina, Charles W., Sturgis 

Hobbs, Charles V.. 627 Westview. Ashland. 324-9439 
Hollar. Lanny W., 102 Thorne Hts.. Eminence. 846-4831 
Holloway. Samuel James. Ferguson, 678-8633 
Holthouser. Ora Lee, 614 West So. Heights. Louisville, 366-4724, 

774-7628 
Holton, Ray, 9715 Shady Acres Lane. Jeffersontown. 267-6643 
Hord. Ronnie D.. 801 Page St.. Campbellsville, 465-6871, 466-8736 
Howard, Darwin, Route 1. Box 376, Hazard, 436-5928 
Howard, Richard M.. 20 Redwood Drive, Roslyn, N. Y.. 621-0873, 

461-8330 
Howard. Robert E., Kettle Island. 337-5368. 337-5260 
Hubbard, Perry Lee, 609 Sixth St.. Pineville, 337-9137 (Bus,)' 
Huff Buford. Garrett, 946-2383 

Huffaker. Robert E.. 410 Columbia Ave.. Monticello. 348-8100 
Hume. Charles. 1909 Benson. Bowling Green. 843 3730, 842-6335 
Hutchens, Jim, Box 243, Belfry, 237-1204, 353-7362 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1968 



Idol, Billy Joe, 124 Leafwood Road, Middlesboro, 248-2837 

Ingham. George C. 48 W. 5th St.. Florence 

Ingram, William, Det. C 12th MP GP (C), Fort Knox, 4-7455, 

4-7457 
Irwin, Charlie. Route 4, Hopkinsville, TU 6-4820, TU 6-4820 
Jahnigen, Robert E., 6675 Plantation Way, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

521-2424, 521-2425 
James, Gene, lo07 S. 3rd St., Ironton. Ohio, 532-6976, 532-6224 
Jenkins, Beryl. 2326 S. 11th St., Ironton. Ohio, 532-5215 
Johnson, Richard. 687 Woodland, Lexington, 233-1564 
Johnson, Ronald L.. 3304 Soutngate Drive, Hopkinsville, 

885-5242, 475-4251 
Johnson, W. E., Route 1, Mt. Sterling, 498-3670, 498-9175 
Johnson, WllJie Box. 941 McClure Ave.. Henderson, VA 7-3626 
Jones. Dan, Cleaton, 754-2652 

Jones, Ervin. 1804 Oak St., Hopkinsville, 886-1144, 798-6903 
Jones, John H.. Route 1, Adolphus. Scottsville, 622-6200 
Jude, HaroId_D., Matewan, W. Va. 
Jump. PranK E., 2U0 Elizabetn, Bowling Green, 842-8060, 

843-4707 
Junker. Edwin G.. 1045 W. Seymour. Cincinnati, Ohio, 821-4177 
Keatley, James H., Route 1. Delbarton. W. Va. 
Keeling, W. D., Jr., Route 3, Paducah, 442-3858, 442-2157 
Kelly, William G., 421-A "A" St., Fort Knox, 624-7887. 

624-1957 
Kennedy, Billy W.. Route 1. Box 958, PikeviUe, 432-3198 
Kilcoyne, James D.. 104 N. 15th St.. Murray. 753-5289, 753-4406 
Kirk, Charles Floyd, Main Street, Benham, 848-2039 
Knox, Edward G., III. Normal Hall No. 26. Morehead. 784-9177 
Kratzenberg, Rirhard. 2535 S. 8th St.. Ironton, Ohio 
Lally, James J., 3407 Gonewind Drive, Louisville, 366-9511 

(Bus.) 
Landers. John F.. 32 Charlemagne. Clarksville, Tenn., 647-2656, 

798-3320 
Landreth, Robert H., 211 Union St., Maysville. 564-5041 
Lanham, Tony. 200 Hopeful Road, Florence. 341-9600. 431-5352 
Laubheimer, Don T.. 4516 Estate Drive. Louisville, 366-3880, 

583-3694 
Lay. William B.. 1268 Gainesway Drive. Lexington, 266-5243, 

233-2000, ext. 2234 
Layne. David Allen, Ivel, GR 8-4471 
Leahy, Pat, 2907 Cromarty Way, I^uisville, 459-2066, 587-1121, 

ext. 472 
Lee. Gary, Mortons Gap, 258-5569 
Letevers, Colman. Kettle Island. 337-3808 
Lee, Reggie, Mortons Gap, 258-5440 

LeQuire, H. M.. Woodland Hills. Harlan. 573-1857. 573-5151 
Levy. Arthur E.. Route 2. Box 74-A. Williamson, W. Va. 
Lillie. William Westly, 3018 Taylorsville Road, Louisville, 

451-0662, 587-2658 
Lloyd, Birt Leonard, 4223 Auburn Road, Huntington, W. Va. 
Logsdon, Al, 626 Cherry, Calvert City. 395-4542 
Long. James E.. P. O. Box 73, Baskett. VA 7-5000. VA 7-1867 
Lowe, Gene T.. Route 6. Box 28. London, 864-5724. 864-2207 
Luebbei-s. Leonard, 1147 W^oody Lane. Cincinnati. Ohio. 471-3122, 

921-6430 
Lusby, George, 615 Pueblo Trail. Georgetown. 863-1440. 863-1170 
Lykins. James O.. 90 Allison Drive. Florence. 371-9531 
McCamish, Dan. Route 6. Box E-4. Lexington 
McCarley, John W., Route 1. Vance Lane, Russellville, 

726-9456, 726-6434 
McCowan. Connell, Route 1. Box 251. Corbin, 528-4932 
McCoy. Larry, 503 Wilderness Road, Louisville, 363-5180, 

634-3611 
McGehee. Gordon. 733 Forest Lane. Covington, 261-6880 
McGlothlin, Leonard. 1237 Gilbert Lane, Owensboro, 683-5242, 

683-2401, ext. 618 
McKenzie, Robert L.. 1809 Chestnut St., Kenova, W. Va. 
McLane. Albert I.. Route 1. Glendale. Cecilia 862-4579. 862-3924 
McMillin. Larry L., P. O. Box 178. Crestwood. 241-4731. 241-4458 
McMurry, Donald R., 3610 Newburg A-9, Louisville, 454-3738, 

458-2911 
McMenama. John H., 2128 Talisman Drive. Lexington, 277-0254. 

254-4416 
McNamee. Jack. 3616 Muddycreek. Cincinnati, Ohio, 922-5207 
McNichols. Teddy J., Route 4, Cadiz, 522-6235 
McPherson, Ray A.. 365 Marmil Circle, South Fort Mitchell, 

341-4943 
Maddox, Richard, 344 W. Broadway, Madisonville. 821-1841, 

821-3221 
Madon. Robert L., Catalpa Street, Pineville, 337-2135, Frank- 
fort 564-4890 
Mahone, Lossie, Lenore. W. Va. 
Maines, George E., 632 Millvale Drive. Lexington. 278-1984, 

262-2361 
Maine, E. Orrin, Jr.. University Station, Box 462, Murray, 

763-4790 
Marcum, Bruce. 1250 College Ave. Barboursville. W. Va. 
Markham. James R., 2069 Fontaine. Lexington. 266-3892 
Marsh. Garry Lee. Route 1, Verona, 643-5272 
Martin, Woody Ray. P. O. Box 681. Morgantown, 526-4768, 

526-3384 
Mathis, David L.. 3516 Navanac St., Louisville, 775-8828, 

582-5170 
Mattingly, Cecil N., 415 Oak St.. Lebanon Junction. 833-4873 
Mattingly. Charles "Pete," 3813 Poplar Level Road. Louisville, 

459-5793, 459-6085 
May, E. B., Jr.. Box 185, Prestonsburg, 886-3414, 886-8661 



Maynard. William D., 651 Indian Branch Road, Kenova, 

W. Va. 
Melmige, James, Jr., P. O. Box 2117, Williamson, W. Va. 
Meredith, Thomas C, 203 E. 23rd St., Owensboro 
Metzger, Donald R., 9312 Cloverwood Lane. Fern Creek, 

239-9813 
Meyer, Bud, 5319 Lilibet Court, Cincinnati, Ohio, 922-3459, 

381-4300 
Middleton. Johnny, 209 Leimeur Drive, Richmond, 623-1682 
Milburn, Martin Craig, Route 3 A, Springfield, 336-7092 
Miller, Claude O., 704 i/i Tenth Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Miller, Edward D., Jr., b"262 Rosalind Road. Huntington. W. Va. 
Mitchell. Emmett D., Ash Grove P.ke, Nichoiasville, 266-3071, 

254-3871 
Mooneyhan. James H., 810 Henry St.. Franklin. 586-4989, 

586-4451 
Moore, Robert, 441 Forest Ave., Erlanger, 341-6837, 563-1100 
Moore, Roy, 101 Carpenter Lane, London. 864-5023. 864-5474 
Moreland, Donald J.. 11 Lewis St., Huntington. W. Va. 
Morgan, Richard, Route 6, Box 64. London. 864-6511, 864-5114 
Morse, Richard K.. 163 N. Deepwood, Radcliff. 351-3748, 624-4464 
Mounts, David G., 217 Marlene Drive, Evansville, Ind., 423-6930, 

423-7832 
MuUins. Jeri-y A.. P. O. Box 484. Mt. Vernon 
Nash, Dennis B.. 2426 Donna. Louisville. 447-8161. 447-3442 
Newsome, William, Jr.. Route 1, Harold. 428-6670 
Newton. John T.. 326 Summit St., Richmond, 622-3670 (Bus.) 
Norwood, Donald V.. Route 6. Franklin. 586-5119, 586-4636 
Norwood. Thomas R.. 811 Henry St., Franklin. 586-3614, 

586-3541 
Omer. Harold G.. 150 N. Crestmoor, Louisville. 896-4170 
O'Nan. Norman, Route 1. Box 305. Henderson. 7-3968. 6-9578 
Orem. Dale Linton, 409 Chippewa. Jeffersonville, Ind.. 283-8225, 

584-0371 
Osborne. Gary Lee, Route 3, Eubank. 379-5241 
Osting. Lawrence J., 1221 Bates- Court, Louisville, 451-2070 
Owens, Roy, Route 4, Box 71. London. 864-7489 
Pace. Donald, 2023 Deauville, Lexington, 262-6535. 265-0398 
Page. James Neal. 308 Catalpa St.. Pineville. 337-3814. 337-3814 
Pardue. Israel L., 1005 S. 28th St., Louisville. 772-2488, 774-6431 
Parsons, Fred, 401 B. Smith Ave., Cumberland, 589-2336, 

589-4625 
Paxton, Gary R., Route 2, Versailles Road, Lexington, 252-0570, 

252-0570 
Payne. Gayle, Bethlehem, 878-5980 
Peecher. W. Lloyd. 6928 Woodland Ave.. Sciotoville, Ohio, 

776-6157, 776-6157 
Peeno. Harry. 124 Morris Road. Lookout Heights, Covington, 

331-1981, AX 1-4307 
Perry, Tom. Route 2. Mt. Sterling. 498-3827 
Phillippi. Jack, 3817 Feather. Erlanger. 341-0162, 331-0080 
Phipps, James M.. Heidrick. 546-6344. 528-3611 
Pickett. Phillip M., 2016 Spring Station. Lexington, 299-7006 
Pietrowski, Paul, 108 Bishop St.. Corbin, 528-6391 
Plate, Arthur C, 6213 Kenwood Hills, Cincinnati, Ohio, 661-4105, 

891-9091 
Points, Charles, 414 Swan Circle, Elsmere. 341-3712, 684-3101 
Powers, Clark, P. O. Box 550, Baxter, 573-2897 
Powers. Elmer. Route 3, Barbourville. 546-5261. 546-4007 
Prichard. Glenn W.. P. O. Box 125. Warfield. 393-3250. 393-3200 
Prince. Billie Welton, Route 1. Clinton. 01 3-4167 
Priode. Charles. Route 2. Box 267. South Point. Ohio, 377-2289 
Pruitt, Donald Wayne, Route 1. Clinton, 653-6438 
Quisenberry, James M., 1900 Farnsley Road, Apt. 9, Louisville, 

448-6152 
Ramsey. Paul A., P. O. Box 91, Clay City, 663-2780 
Rankin, James, 1018 S. 29th St., No. 7, Louisville, 778-4040, 

935-4144 
Reed. Andrew, Elsie 
Reed. Gordon (Moe). 22 Riverside Parkway, Fort Thomas, 

441-4946. 631-5750 
Renfro, John E., Box 298, Williamsburg, 549-3692, 549-0366 
Rhodes, Cecil, P. O. Box 291. Barbourville, 546-4777 
Ring. Bill, 481 Rookwood Paikway. Lexington. 299-7089, 255-8492 
Roberts. Elza, Jr., P. O. Box 214. New Castle, 346-6981. 584-1341, 

ext. 339 
Roberts. Kenneth Gary, Route 1, Box 186, Crestwood, 279-5165, 

279-5165 
Robertson. William R., 121 Main St., Springfield. 336-7154, 

336-9977 
Robinson, Don L., 2012 Poplar St., Kenova, W. Va. 
Rodgers, Tom H., 327 Scott, Madisonville. 821-7312, 338-3800 
Ross, Harold L., P. O. Box 344. Elkton, 265-2493. 265-2506 
Russman, Godfrey F., Jr., 1041 Goss Ave., Louisville, 969-2175, 

635-7426 
Sagers, Robert M., 494 Morrvue, Cincinnati, Ohio, 922-8230, 

721-5240. ext. 33 
Salyer. Henry E., 4817 Bluebird Ave., Louisville. 969-6371, 

634-1511. ext. 6071 
Sammons. Terry L.. 4308 Burnt Cedar, Louisville, 964-0852, 

687-1121. ext. 252 
Sanders. Mel, 4300 Kimberly Court, Paducah, 442-3650, Illinois 

664-4081 
Saylors, Carlee, Route 6. Murray. 763-7979. 924-5602 
Scales, Meredith E., Ingle. 871-3297 
Scalf. Hubert Dean. Stanville. 478-2062 
Schad. Jim. 816 Yorkhaven Road. Springdale, 825-3343, 825-8844 



THE KENTUCKY mCH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1968 



Page Seven 



Schildmeyer, Paul E., 78 Albert St., Cincinnati, Ohio, 861-6480, 

241-2166 
Schmidt. Thomas C, 9208 Matilda Court, Louisville, 964-1246, 

582-5521 
Schneider, Phillip, 409 Meadow Park, Lexington, 262-4003 
Scott, W. L. "Bill," 1816 McDonald Road, Lexington. 278-2844, 

254-1313 
Sears. Wilson, 524 Springdale Road, Brandenburg, 422-2805, 

422-3214 
Seavers, Joe, 2517 Ann St., Ludlow, 341-0213, 291-8925 
Seibert, Billy Ray, 313 S. Main, Dawson Springs, 797-2488, 

797-2488 
Selher, td, 520 Cricklewood Drive, 299-8042 
Selvy, Curt. 118 Earl, Corbin, 528-4677 
Sexton. Steven Carroll, P. O. Box 354, Whitesburg, 633-7114, 

832-4220 
Shartzer, Philip E., 4008 Hycliffe, Louisville, 893-7108, 636-1361 
Shaw, Earl, 121 Hagan Court. Lancaster, 792-2370, 548-2208 
Shemwell, Bobby. Route 7. Glasgow, 651-5011 (Bus.) 
Shewmaker, Wayne, 206 W. Meadow Drive, Clarksville, Tenn., 

647-7351, 645-5931 
Shewmaker, Treffert, 634 Longview Drive, Lexington, 277-9117 
Shipp, David Earl, 16 E. Southgate, Fort Thomas, 781-1163 
Showalter, John. 116 Military, Georgetown, 863-1892 
Sims. Tom M.. Route 5 Hillcrest. R.chmond 
Singer, Tony. Route 1, Cecilia, 862-4358, 769-2311 
Singleton, Ronnie H.. 3316 Radiance Road, Louisville, 459-4199, 

772-3661, ext. 2253 
Sizemore. Aster, 2d Sunvalley Terrace, Hazard, 436-3402, 

436-2107 
Smith, Richard R., 3853 Walhampton Drive, Lexington, 277-6881 
Smith, Swonnie Lee, P. O. Box 487, Mt. Vernon, 453-9061 (Bus.) 
Smith, Thomas V. 2915 Sheldon Road, Louisville, 468-3934, 

582-3611 
Smith, William E., 4122 St. John's Tr., Cincinnati. Ohio, 

791-3082, 731-2341, ext. 268 
Sparks. Carl E., Red Jacket High School. Red Jacket. W. Va. 
Spencer, Irv. Old State Road. Brandenburg. 422-3294, 937-2300 
Spradlin, Robert. P. O. Box 236, West Van Lear, 789-5093 
Spurlin. Gaylan Lee, Route 1, Greenville, 338-3255. 338-3255 
Staples. Jerry D.. Route 1, Box 203. Henderson, 827-3633, 

826-9085 
Starling, Edward. 819 Vinson St., Williamson. W. Va. 
Steely. Robert W., Letcher. 633-7880 

Stephens, Herbert D.. 133 First St.. West Ceredo, W. Va. 
Stephens, Robert J., P. O. Box 527, Charlton Heights, W. Va. 
Stephenson. Harry S., 1612 Hawthorn. Lexington. 299-1757. 

233-8310 
Stoess, Henry L.. 314 Kavanaugh Road. Crestwood. 241-4196, 

451-0142 
Strain, Richard P., P. O. Box 472, Radcliff, 351-4306, Fort 

Knox 624-1231 
Strong. Arnett, 116 Kentucky Blvd., Hazard, 436-3938, 436-2141 
Sucietto. Richard, 6572 Gaines Road. Cincinnati, Ohio. 621-7495, 

761-4130, ext. 310 
Sullivan, Don Chris, 2083 Old Nassau Road, Lexington, 

277-6953, 277-6953 
Sumner. Carl H., 3133 Doreen Way, Louisville, 454-7294, 

459-1030. ext. 205 
Swarts, Joseph C. 135 Lane St.. Coal Grove. Ohio. 632-9349 
Tackett, Archie. Inez, 298-3445 

Taylor, Billy Joe, Route 1, Box 880, Pikeville, 432-1066 
Taylor, Jim. 8304 Glaser Lane, Fern Creek, 239-8785. 587-1121. 

ext. 265 
Taylor, Norman H.. Route I, Box 5-26, Crestwood. 241-4425, 

Louisville 582-5341 
Teague, Donald Alan. P. O. Box 192. Nortonville. 676-3206 
Tegethoff, Kenneth E., Route 2. Corydon, VA 7-5891 
Thomas, Frank M., 6291/2 S. 44th St., Louisville, 774-2624 
Thomas, Paul E.. P. O. Box 435A, Franklin Furnace, Ohio, 

574-5111, 674-6111 
Thompson. Jack. 2347 Saratoga Drive, Louisville, 452-4255, 

464-4585 
Thompson, Larry, P. O. Box 36, Mt. Sterling, 498-3346, 498-2660 
Thompson. Tom D.. 97 Carran Drive, Fort Mitchell, 341-1809, 

581-1322. ext. 211 
Tillery, James C. 205 Forest St., Berea, 986-8523, 623-1340 
Tisdale, John H., 1626 "C" Moore Court. Louisville, 634-1611, 

ext. 269 (Bus.) 
Troutman, David. Route 1, Hawesville, 927-3111. 927-2201 
Troutman. Doyle, P. O. Box 304. Harlan. 673-1349. 837-2602 
Tuttle. Quinton. Route 1. Box 494. Pikeville, 432-3566 
Tyre, Donald C, 316 Senate Drive, Frankfort, 223-3668, Lex- 
ington 564-6612. ext. 244 
Urlage, Richard, 822 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas. 441-6613, 

471-8120 
Vaden, James M.. 2126 Harrison, Paducah, 442-1575. 443-6404 
Vance. Hunter, Jr., 214 Robin. Bowling Green, 842-3595, 842-6611 
Vanhook. Samuel, Route 3, Cynthiana, 234-2336, 234-4313 
VanHoose. James. Route 1, Box 218-B, Catlettsburg, 928-8966, 

928-8600 
VanMeter. Charles. Jr.. Asbury College, Wilmore, 269-3322, 

858-9987 
VanMeter. McNeill, Bee Spring. 697-2000 
Vanover. J. W.. Jackhorn. 855-7730. 633-2168 
Vanover. Wiley G.. Jackhorn. Neon 855-2441 
VanZant. Jim, P. O. Box 602. Williamson, W. Va. 
Varner, Ray G., 737 Kingston Road, Lexington, 299-4145 



Vaughn. Ronald B., Route 1, Providence, 667-2702 

Vaugnan, Teddy Ray. Box 701. Pineville 

Vermillion. C. D.. 1402 Roosevelt, Corbin, 628-2942 

Vescovi, Raymond B., 3525 Laurel Ave., Evansville, Ind., 

423-8144, 963-3366 
Vettiner, Charlie, Colonial Manor, Jeffersontown 
Vickery, Dan D., 108 H.gh St., Mont.cello, 348-5574 
Vineiguerra, Phillip, Maiewan, W. Va. 
Vipperman, Albert E., Ransom. 427-2810, 363-7362 
Voorhis, Kenneth, 8308 Pandorea, Louisville, 937-9831 
Vories, Dick, 1211 Wilson Road, Bellevue, 781-1391, 541-0728 
Wagner. Marvin Rudy, Route 1, Box 446, Pikeville, 437-4611 
Waldridge, Charles Robert, 1109 State St., Bowling Green, 
843-3231, 842-0111, ext. 34 

Walker. James C, Route 1. Clinton, 653-4149, 663-2451 
Walker, Myron C, 5501 Childs Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, 662-0165, 

421-4722 
Wallace, Curt, Route 2, Box 468-A, Somerset, 678-4080, 679-1674 
Wallace, Theodore J., 12 Osage Ave., Crestview, 441-3668, 

921-8100 
Wallen. Howard W., WiUiamsport, 789-3066, 789-4890 
Waller, BoDb.e E.. 30:J &tiat,iiiiore, Lexington, 299-6123 
Walsh. Bernard N.. Box 35, Warsaw, 567-5521, 567-5521 
Walters, Darwin. Route 1, Box 4A3. Georgetown, Ohio, 

378-3363, 379-2781 
Walters. Wayne, Tinsley, 337-5016, 337-2435 

Walton. Roy. 3842 Nurthaminon. Luxington, 277-2241, 266-0532 
Ward. Bob, 2040 Washington. Henderson, VA 7-3805, VA 7-3522 
Ward. Donald E., Milo, 2a8-3502, 298-3471 
Ward, Willis, Route 3, Clinton. OL 3-6835 
Watkins, James R., 1607 Thornberry, Louisville, 368-4032, 

361-1231 
Watts. Frank Cooper, P. O. Box 146, Bardstown, 348-3977, 

348-3363 
Watts, Leon, P. O. Box 727, Hazard, 436-5035 
Wayne. Bill T.. Route 1. Box 501, Henderson. 826-9441 
Weaver, Clyde Ivan, P. O. Box 254, Williamson. W. Va. 
Weaver, Ray, 3117 Bernard Drive, Fort Mitchell, 341-2610, 

341-8066 
Webb. James Douglas, Route 6, Box 14, Richmond, 623-9267, 

623-9778 
Webb. James Otis. 133 Main St., Horse Cave, 786-2869, 786-2869 
Webb, Ralph Dudley. 1646 Maywick. Lexington, 278-2904 
Weber. Thomas C, 3707 St. Germaine. Louisville. 896-4298 
Weiner, Richard, 8 Poplar Ridge Road, Alexandria. 635-5083, 

761-4130, ext. 264 
Welch. Donald G., Route 2. Worthville, 732-6676 
Wells, Glenn. 515 Erianger Road. Erlanger. 341-0481. 872-5764 
Wesche, James A., 1704 Chickasaw. Lexington, 299-8058 
Westerfield. James C, Route 1, Box 312, Manchester, 698-2693, 

698-3138 
Westerfield. Thomas W., 104 Loftus, Hopkinsville, 886-2882, 

885-3384 
Wetzel. Don, 2906 Cheyenne Drive, Owensboro, 685-1071, 

684-9419 
Weyer, James G., 42 Scenic View Drive, Fort Thomas, 781-2220, 

341-5800 
Whalen, William C. Route 1. Maysville. 664-3942, 564-3461 
Wheat. Buell, 403 N. 6th. Scottsville, 237-3067 
Wneeler, Donald Wayne. Peachree Lane, Alvaton. 842-7807, 

843-3031 
Wheeler, Joe H., P. O. Box 8, Ferguson, 679-2903. 661-9493 
White. David B.. 120 Media Drive, Bowling Green, 843-3884, 

843-6017 
Whitley. James R.. 208 Cranewood Drive, Trenton, Ohio, 

988-6740. 771-8200 
Whitt, Hobert, Jr., 158 Robin Road, Russell, 836-3675, 836-4212 
Whitt, Jimmy. Sandy Hook, 738-647V 
Whittaker. Kenneth Earl, 669 Nelson Place, Newport. 581-9776, 

431-8976 
Whittemore, Paul F., 2163A Swift Road, Fort Bliss. Texas 
Wickham. James, Jr., 311 Cathedral Manor, Bardstown, 348-5282, 

833-4611 
Wihebrink, James A., 610 Lexington Ave., Newport. 291-3710 
Wilbert, Louis. 3504 Terrier Lane. Louisville, 458-4092, 368-2559 
Wilcher, Jerry. P. O. Box 177. McKinney 
Wilcox. Ursal Ray, Auxier. 886-3329, 886-2703 
Williams. Benny. Route 3. Philpot. 729-4566, 683-4221 
Williams. James H.. Elmwood Drive, South Shore, 932-4372, 

353-7440 
Williams. Larry H., 5055 Poplar Level Road, Louisville, 

968-1518 
Williams, Paul W.. Country Club Apts.. Paintsville, 789-5665 
Williams, Roger, 404 Bond St.. Richmond. 623-3126 
Williams. S. Jack, 323 Steele St., Frankfort, 223-5078, 564-5594 
Williams. Tom G.. Transylvania College. Henry Clay Hall, 

Lexington. 233-8507 (Bus.) 
Williamson, Fred. 1069 N. Cir. Road, No. 133, Lexington, 

255-4939, 252-5556 
Wilson, Gerald Lee. P. O. Box 32. Hazel Green, 662-6366 
Wilson. Jim, P. O. Box 24, Tateville, Burnside, 561-4203, 

Ferguson 678-5229 
Wilson, Phillip. Staff Haw Sea Fron. FPO. San Francisco 
Winchester. Roy L.. Bethlehem. 878-4102. New Castle 346-8761 
Winfrey. Shelby. 315 Sharon Drive. Campbellsville, 466-8392 

(Continued on Page Ten) 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1968 



The Flying Dutchman 




Colonels Phil Eskew and Herman Keller of the 
Indiana High School Athletic Association surprised the 
Dutchman with an honor luncheon in the Marrott Hotel 
in Indianapolis on September 28. The occasion was the 
fourlecn.h and final basketball clinic which the Flying 
Dutchman would conduct for Indiana's officials. It was 
an occasion when the Dutchman's cup ran over with 
human friendship, kindness and appreciation. That 
Indiana plaque hangs on the wall of my office at Colo- 
nial Manor. 

The cup continued to spill over on the clinic tour 
across Kentucky. At Somerset Bill Clark presented a 
country ham; at Elizabeth town Howard Gardner's offi- 
cials association held an honor luncheon and that statu- 
ette keeps the Indiana plaque company. Hardin Mc- 
Lane, public relatio'ws director of the Kentucky Colonels, 
had one of those red, white and blue basketballs for the 
Dutchman, and Brad Mutchler had a magnificent coun- 
try ham as a gift waiting in Paducah. The basketball is 
in my office at the zoo but that ham went fast. Brad. 
Two more hams were sent to my room at Gabe's in 
Owensboro and somebody else supplied another at 
Bowhng Green. I don't know who sent them. 

That Bowling Green clinic will always stand out in 
my memory because my old coach, Ed Diddle, came to 
the clinic to present me a plaque with the remark, "I 
started you out as a basketball official back in 1930 and 
I wanted to be with you here in Bowling Green when 
you finished up after a thirty-eight year sports career as 
an official interpreter and member of the National Rules 
Committee." I wake up at night yet with a lump in my 
'throat as my ruminating mind recalls all the things that 
Coaoh Ed Diddle, the greatest of them all, did for me 
and many others. 

Nostalgia takes me back to the Year of 1928 when I 
first reported for football practice down on the Russell- 
ville Pike and Coach Diddle taught me with one short 
lecture how to fight — "Charlie," he said, "you're a little 
guy and you're going to get knocked down a lot but 
always keep getting up and when that other guy gets 
tired of 'hitting you then you slap the fire out of him." 
Coach Diddle recalled that lecture at the Bowling Green 
Clinic with tlie remark, "You know that little Dutchman 
took my advice. I've watched him now for thirty-eig'ht 
years and he keeps getting back up — now mind you, he's 
never whipped anybody but he's still getting back up." 
That was a great lesson you taught that day. Coach, 
because a bloody head Which is unbowed is stiU a proud 
one. That plaque you gave me on behalf of those Bowl- 
ing Green officials hangs on the wall of my Louisville 
office in Central Park. 



Now 'this Dutchman looks back and remembers 
fondly this last Kentucky Clinic tour when every session 
brought new and friendly gestures. Commissioner Ted 
Sanford's speech at Lexington and his taking the lead 
to produce a standing farewell ovation brings a grateful 
tear even now as this article is penned. It's tough to 
give up these annual friendly trips but nothing lasts 
forever— not even that Horse Cave cheese which Ralph 
Dorsey brought to the honor dinner in "Diddle Town" 
and Which my hungry Jeffersontown friend. Bill Neill, 
devoured at one sitting. 

While nothing lasts forever, new doors open as Louis- 
ville and Jefferson County set up a model, merged park 
and recreation program which is one of the largest in 
the world. Another door opens as this Dutchman packs 
his bags to fly to Indianaoolis to speak to the Indiana 
Education Association. There's always work to do, and 
God put you and me here to do it — so let's get with it. 

Each year a "Mr. Recreation of Kentucky" is pro- 
claimed. He is the man who is judged to have done the 
moit for parks and recreation in Kentucky and he must 
have done these deeds most unselfishly. There have been 
some very illustrious men win this title, among them 
being former Governor Lawrence Wetherby, Marlow 
Cook, Henry Ward, Ernie Ohattin, Max Sanders and 
Ted Sanford For the Year of 1968 the Plying Dutchman 
proclaims Charles Unseld of Newburg "Mr. Recreation 
of Kentucky." 

Charles Unseld is a big man in so msmy ways. First 
he is a giant in physical stature, next he is big because 
his family reflects credit on him as a parent, and finally 
he is big because he loves his community. When vandals 
burned down the Newburg recreation building he had 
worked so hard to help build, he personally went to 
work immediately to rebuild it into a bigger and better 
building for the boys, girls, men and women whom he 
loves. Kentucky salutes "Big Charles" for this. 

At the Kentucky State Fair people ralhed from all 
over the state to back "Big Charles" Unseld. People 
contributed money while volunteer help of all kind came 
from many sources. So it is that on the ruins of a 
burned building our "Mr. Recreation of Kentucky" has 
again demonstrated that old Coach Diddle philosophy — 
"If they knock you down, keep getting back up." 

The Dutchman itips his hat to "Big Charles" Unseld 
and repeats for him: 

A GAME GUY'S PRAYER 

"DEAR GOD: Help me to be a sport in this little 
game of Mfe. I don't ask for amy place in the lineup; 
play me where you need me. I only ask for the stuff to 
give you a hundred per cent of what I've got. If all 
the iiard drives come my way I thank you for the com- 
pliment. Help me to remember ithat You won't let any- 
thing come that You and I together can't handle. And 
help me to take the bad breaks as part of the game. 
Help make me thankful for ithem. 

"And, God, help me always to play on the square, no 
matter what :the other players do. Help me to come 
clean. Help me to see that often the best part of the 
game is helping the other guys. Help me to be a 'regu- 
lar fellow' with the other players. 

"Finally, God, if fate seems to uppercut me witih 
both hands and I'm laid up on the shelf in sickness or 
old age, help me to take that as part of the game also. 
Help me not to whimper or squeal that 'the game was a 
frameup or that I had a raw deal. When in the dusk I 
get ithe final bell, I ask for no lying, complimentary 
stones. I'd orjy like to know that You feel I've been a 
good guy." — Chaplain's Digest. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1968 



Page Nine 



FILMS 

(Continued from Inside Front Cover) 

SENECA VS. LEXINGTON DUNBAR (1963 BASKET- 
BALL FINALS), j-s-c-a, 4 reels, silent, color, $1.00 
The Seneca Indians defeated the Lexington Dunbar 
Bearcats by the score of 72-66 to win the forty-sbcth 
annual slate championship. Redd and Unseld led Seneca 
while Wilson and Smith were best for Dunbar. 
SHOOTING IN BASKETBALL, j-s-c^, 1 reel, $2.00 

Concentrating on the set shot, this film pictures the 
action of the throw, stance, aim, trajectory, and finger- 
tip control. Special attention is given total body coordi- 
nation, especially inward rotation of the hand and arm 
making the throw. 

ST XAVIER VS. DAVIESS COUNTY (19M) K.H.S. 
BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT FINALS, e-j-s-c^, 3 
reels, $1.00 

St. Xavier High School of Louisville won the 1958 
State Basketball Tournament by defeating Daviess 
County of Owensboro, 6049, in the final game of the 
tournament at the University of Kentucky Coliseum. 
THIS IS BASKETBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels (33 min.), 
color, $1.00 

Interpretation of play situations goes beyond the 
letter of ^the rule and gives guidelines to better under- 
standing of blocking charging, baskets interference, goal 
tending, screening, and play violations of the free throw, 
jump and boundary lines. 

Golf 
BUILDING YOUR SWING-UNIT H, j-s-c-a, 3 reels (27 
min.), color, $7.50 

Shows how the swing is developed. Stance, rhythm, 
movements of upper and lower body explained with 
unusual movie techniques. Students will identify them- 
selves cleai-ly with examples on the screen as they buUd 
controls into their natural swings. 
PITCHII'^G, PITCH AND RUN AND SAND SHOTS- 
UNIT III, j-s-c-a, IVi reels (12 min.), color, $4.50 
Teaches fundamentals of pitching, pitch and run and 
explosion shots out of sand traps. Carefully demon- 
strates the important differences in arm and wrist 
action for approach shots. 

PUTTING-UNIT IV, j-s-c-a, 1 reel (10 min.), color, 
$4.00 
Demonstrates and teaches several approved tech- 
niques. Wrist and firm wrist swings, tap and stroke 
methods of applying momentum to the ball and how to 
play uneven greens. 

SAVING STROKES WITH SAM SNEAD, s-c^, 1 reel, 
$2.00 

Golf champion Sam Snead Illustrates his grip, his 
stance, ihis swing on each of several types of golf situa- 
tion. Slow motion and "freeze" shots help to clarify the 
instruction. Shots and driver, brassie, and various irons 
for difficult lies are illustrated and finally his putting 
technique is shown. 

WELCOME TO GOLF-UNIT I, j-s-c^, IVi reels (13 
min.) color, $4.50 

Motivates the student to want to play golf. Shows 
him bow to learn and What is expected of him. Helps 
him understand the game, the goU course and the 
equipment. 

Swimming 
BEGINNING SWIMMING, e-j-s-c<i, 1 reel, $2.00 

Through scenes photographed both above and beneath 
the surface of the water, basic techniques of swimming 
for beginners are demonstrated. Land and water drills 
involving kicking, breathing, floating, paddUng and 
stroking and pulling with the arm practiced separately, 
then coordinated as the swimmer learns the American 
crawl. The back float, back stroke, and breast stroke 
are also illustrated and explained. 



BREAST STROKE. SIDE STROKE AND UNDER- 
WATER SWIMMING, e-j-s-c^, $2.00 

This film presents the conventional breast stroke, 
timing and strokes, and the kick. 

CHAMPIONSHIP SWLMMING; PERFECTING TECH- 
NIQUE. e-JTS-c-a, 2 reels, (19 min.), color, $5.50 

Outlines briefly the program and training methods 
used by the Santa Clara Swim Club that may be used 
by anyone to train swimmers. The techniques illustrat- 
ed, such as weight, training, circle training, pace clocks, 
bench and stroke work, and interval training, when 
properly applied in the appropriate circumstances, wUl 
all prove beneficial in perfecting swimming style. 
CRAWL STROKE, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $2.00 

The basic principles of the stroke are presented in 
this film. The arm stroke, the kick, and the breathing 
are demonstrated. This film also includes slow motion 
shots under water. 
DIVING FUNDAMENTALS, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $2.00 

After a brief history of the sport of diving, the follow- 
ing points are explained and demonstrated: the hurdle 
jump, determining the correct disitance, proper arm 
action, correct way of landing on the feet, proper take- 
off and lift, correct entry into the water. The backward 
dive is also taught, including lift, arching the body, and 
entry into the water. The motion is stopped at various 
points to enable detailed study of form. 
DOLPHIN KICK, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $2.00 

An excellent swimmer, an underwater camera and 
carefully devised teaching demonstrations introduce the 
new swimming techniques known as the dolphin or 
fishtail kick. Analyzing the body movements used in the 
dolphin kick, the film stresses the importance of prac- 
tice for mastery of this efficient speedy kick. 
I'M NO FOOL IN WATER, p-e-j^, 1 reel (8 min.), 
color, $3.00 

Jiminy Cricket illustrates the "do's" and "don'ts" of 
water safety precautions. Points out the basic rules: 
wait at least two hours after eating, stay out when 
water is too cold, never swim alone, and dive only when 
you know the water is deep enough. 
SWIM AND LIVE, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $1.00 

Men of the Army Air Force at Miami are taught to 
swim from floating to swimming through burning oil. 
The film is useful for pre^induction instruction and for 
safety classes as well as for general programs. 

Tennis 

ADVANCED TENNIS, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $2.00 

While working with a tennis pupil. Bill Tilden nar- 
rates and demonstrates. Showing advanced techniques 
of tennis. 

BEGINNING TENNIS, e-j-s-c^, IV2 reels (14 min.), 
$2.50 

Shows how the tennis instructor teaches tennis to 
beginning and advanced students. Includes an analysis 
of the basic fundamentals of tennis — ^serving, forehand 
and backhand drive, forehand and backhand voUey, 
and the smash. Shows actual play situations in which 
these fundamentals are emphasized, and also includes 
individual demonstration and analysis. 

Trael{ 

THE BROAD JUMP, j-s-c^, 1 reel, $2.00 

Controlled speed-timing and coordination— develop- 
ment of legs and torso — mobility of pelvis and hips, one, 
two, three style — footroll— single and triple air stride — 
soft versus hard take off — arm position. 
DISCUS, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $2.00 

Principle of centrifugal force — muscle development 
for side arm throw — grips — ^finger roll — heel of thumb 
pressure — finger exercise—clockwise spin — Mp snap — 
reverse and non-reverse styles. 



/ 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1968 



DISTANCE RACES, s-c-a, 1 reel, $2.00 

Races from 1,000 to 10,000 meters and steeple diase 
are demonstrated. Style of distance runner is contrasted 
with that of dash man. Difference in typical physiques 
are shown. Slow motion photography ds used to analyze 
movements. 
DISTANCES, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $2.00 

Style — developing stamina — calisthenics — avoiding 
shin splint — controlled tension — forward knee reflex — 
straight line running — automatic stride. 
THE HIGH JUMP, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $2.00 

Belly roll or straddle and improved Western style — 
body lean and reverse — approach — body tension — coordi- 
nation of arm and leg action. 
THE HURDLES, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $2.00 

Basic hurdling styles — rear hip and leg action' — 
rhythmic running — ^hurdling, calisthenics, body balance 
— correct clearance — circular stepover action — adapting 
styles of physiques. 
THE JAVELIN, j-s-c^, 1 reel, $2.00 

Four stage catapult throw — preliminary run^ — con- 
cluding stride — ^throwing stance — tlirowing and reverse — 
alternative ihand and finger grips — ^facing position — bal- 
ance of stomadh and back muscle tension — throwing 
angle — body and leg coordination drills — flexibility exer- 
cises. 
JUMPS AND POLE VAULT, s-c-a, 1 reel, $2.00 

Demonstrations from actual competition are shown 
for running high-jmnp; running broad-jump; hop, step 
and jump; and pole vault. Slow motion photography is 
used for detailed study of form. 
MIDDLE DISTANCES, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $2.00 

Sprinting teciiniques — ball of foot running — automatic 
stride — pendulum and bicycle stride — exercise — counter- 
balanced arm action — push drive — jockeying for posi- 
tion. 
POLE VAULT, j-s-c^, 1 reel, $2.00 

Basic vaulting principles — ^importance of exercises — 
running action — grip-^selecting the pole — ^take-off — 
Western and Eastern style — slotting — novice training. 
THE RELAYS, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $2.00 

Passing — visual pass — ^blind pass — bright and left ex- 
change — merging of runners speed — baton grips — relay 
starts, underhand action — cup style — overhead sprint 
pass — fly scoop — practice and team work. 
THE SPRINTS, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $3.00 

Fundamentals of 100 yard and 200 yard dash — impact 
style and natural stretcJi stride — synchronizing leg and 
arm action — conditioning exercises — starting techniques 
—slow motion of muscular utilization and coordination. 
SHOT PUT, j-s-c^, 1 reel, $2.00 

Fitting styles to physiques — tension control— one, 
two, three rhytlim — exercises — ^finger and hand grip — 
finger and wrist snap — foot positions — progressive ten- 
sion and effort — explosive hip snap. 
THIS IS TRACK AND FIELD, e-jis-c-a, 3 reels, color, 
$1.00 

Uses the Olympic motto "CitiusTAl'tius-Fortius," 
"Swifter Higher-Stronger," to introduce a variety of 
track and field situations. Helps officials, coaches, par- 
ticipants and fans to better understand the baisic rules 
of running, jumping, vaulting and throwing. 

Gymnastics 
BEGINNING TUMBLING, j-s-c-a, 1 reel (11 min.), $2.00 

Presents the two basic progressions in tiunbling — the 
inverted balance and roll progressions. Accompanying 
demonstrations of flips, roUs, and stands (singly and in 
combination) emphasize skillful execution. 
GYMNASTICS, PART 1, j-s-c-a, iy2 reels (17 min.), $3.00 

Introduces tihe basic principles of gymnastics and 
foUows the routines developed by polished performers 
on the parallel bars, the rope cMmb, and the long horse. 



Attention is given to the rolls, handstands, and hand- 
springs, twists, and somersaults that are basic to tiun- 
bling. (Hoefler.) 
GYMNASTICS, PART II, j-s-c-a, IVa reels (17 min.), 

$3.00 

Introduces the gymnast to the fundamentals of free 
exercise routines. Stresses the importance of smooth 
action as well as strength, form, balance, and ability to 
develop the difficult routines. Demonstrates rings, side 
horse, and the high bar. (Hoefler.) 
INTERMEDIATE TUMBLING, j-s-c-a, 1 reel (11 min.), 

$2.00 

Demonstrates twenty stunts in handspring, balance, 
and somersault progressions and safety precautions are 
given to prevent accidents or injuries while teaching 
technique and form. 
SIMPLE STUNTS, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel (11 min.), $2.00 

Provides instructions in healthful group activities 
that require little or no equipment. Demon.strates sim- 
ple stunts for strength and skill and empha.sizes safety 
precautions. 
TUMBLING FOR PHYSICAL FFTNESS: COMPANION 

STUNTS, j-s-c-a, 2 reels (20 min.), $1.00 
Seventeen stunts are demonstrated and the im- 
portance of coordination and timing is emphasized. 

Wrestling 

WRESTLING OFFICIATING ILLUSTRATED, j-s-c-a, 2 
reels, color, $1.00 

Interpretations given in Wrestling Officiating Illus- 
trated have been made by the National Federation 
members of the Joint Rules Committee. The film covers 
takedowns, reversals, escapes, leaving the mat, staUing, 
scoring and illegal holds such as body slam, bar arm, 
full nelson and chicken wing. Guidelines for officiating 
and interpreting the rules are provided. In all there are 
sixty separate scenes of wresting. This fihn wiU pro- 
vide the much needed guidance and proper interpreta- 
tions for interscholastic competition. 
JIU JITSU, j-s-c-a, 1 reel (13 min.), $1.00 

Demonstrates the effective, dangerous Jiu Jitsu 
defenses against knife, gun, club and mugging attacks. 

BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(Continued from Page Seven) 

Wingrfield, Felix G., 1132 E. Parkway, Louisville, 636-2282, 

636-2282 
Winnecke, John E., 1502 Brentwood, Owensboro, 684-2604, 

683-1511 
Wirtz, Howard A., 1324 Hollywood Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

681-1818, 751-3454 
Wirtz, Leonard F.. 1122 Meadowind Ct., Mount Healthy, Ohio, 

931-1468, 522-7960 
Wise. Billy V.. 240 St. Ann Drive, Lexington, 266-7449. 254-4017 
Wise, Jack, 209 Pocahontas, Georgetown, 863-3948, 863-1393 
Withrow, Roy D.. Route No. 1, Sacramento 
Witten, Cliffford, Wurtland Avenue, Wurtland, 836-8806 
Witten Hershel D., 120 Popp, Sellersburg, Indiana, 246-2306 
Witten, James Richard. Wurtland Avenue. Wurthland 836-8806 
Wolfe, Douglas K., 107 Kingston, Louisville 
Wolfe, Jack W., Union College, P. O. Box 444. Barbourville, 

546-5246, 546-4210 
Wolfe. Paul A.. 510 Beech St.. Falmouth, 654-5341, 441-9992 
Wood. Ellsworth, 332 Tenth. Dayton. 261,5256 
Wood, James Randall, Route No. 5, Falmouth, 654-8426, 581-7700 
Woods, Gene B.. Route 4, Murray. 753-8718, 395-4180 
Woosley, James R.. II, Caneyville, 879-3375 
Woolen, Chester. RR 1, Box 634. Hazard, 436-2603. 436-5771 
Wooten, George B., 96 Rosemont, Providence. 667-2932 667-2613 
Woprice, Ronald J.. U21 Hennepin Drive, Louisville, 366-1233, 

584-1361, Ext. 7229 
Wray. Robert F.. 29 Belle Monte. Ft. Mitchcell, 341-1778, 431- 

3200. Ext. 76 
Wright, H. W., Jr., 1404 Hobart Drive, Louisville, 368-2797, 

587-1161, Ext. 416 
Wright. James L.. 121 Showalter Drive, Georgetown, 863-3628, 

233-2000, Ext. 3280 
Wright. Raleigh F.. Broad Bottom, 432-3507 
Wulfeck. James, 111 Burdsall Avenue, Ft. Mitchcell, 331-3599, 

341-6800 
Wurtz, Emil, 18 E. 4th St.. Cincinnati. Ohio. 471-0526, 381-1232 
Wyatt, William T., 112 Bellvue, Bowling Green. 843-8098, 842- 

9431 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1968 



Page Eleven 



Yanoff, Jay M., 1935 Gardiner Lane, Apt. No. G66, Louisville, 

451-0420. 282-8231 
Yarbrough, Boy Dean, Jr., 2069 Fontaine Road, Lexington, 

266-3892 
Yates, Virgil, 1102 Dogwood. Fulton, 472-3809, 479-1441 
Yelton, Gene B., Route No. 2, Brooksville, 735-3922. 735-3591 
Yewell, Morgan R.. Jr., 475 Flamingo, Frankfort, 876-2745, 

Lexington, 252-6535 
York. Jim E., 5114 Outer Loop, Louisville, 964-0154, 454-7511, 

Ext. 4477 
Young, Danny L., Route No. 1, Hawesville, 927-6313, 927-2641 
Zachary, David A., Cliffway Drive, Carlisle, 289-2398, 298-2274 
Zahner, Dennis William, 18 Kessler Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

221-1706 
Zimmerer, Ray Martin, 2220 Heather Lane, Louisville, 458-6664, 

585-5331, Ext. 77 
Zlamal, Raymond K., 641 Johnson Ave., Lynch, 848-5966 



Postscripts on Athletics 
By Dr. Rhea H. Williams 

One of #18 most useful purposes for athletios or any 
type of play is that it gives opportunities for the 
emotions to be expressed and to be directed in tihe 
proper channels. It is a proven psychological fact that 
every person has to have some opportunity to vent his 
emotions, and athletics and play are among the best 
ways. 

Psydhologists call any method which allows a person 
to express his emotions in a manner which avoids 
harmful mental or physical "explosions" 'the "safety 
valve" theory. Thus, athletics and play are excellent 
"'safety valve" laboratories for the emotions. 

We all know from personal experience thart human 
beings are emotional and that they must have op- 
portunities to express them or else they will "explode". 

Emotions which are not allowed to be expressed in 
desirable fashions will be displayed in undesirable 
fashions. One of every 15 Americans today will enter 
a mental hospital sometime during his life, and many 
other neurotic people not included in the above are 
found in society. There must be some activities which 
give a person an opportunity for wholesome and desir- 
able pouring out of emotions. If they are bottled up and 
not allowed to "comie out" then that person will become 
neurotic and wdU display abnormal mental and social 
traiits. 

Emotions 

Athletics Eind play providte perhaps one of the better 
means of allowing iflhe expression of emotions by school- 
age chdldren. Through play and gaimes boys and girls 
run the gamut of expressions from tension to relaxa- 
tion, from sorrow to gladness, from silence to exultation 
and from tears to laughter. There is no greater op- 
portunity to train the emotions, while at the same time 
allowing them to be expressed than in athletics and 
play. The emotions, if allowed complete freedom with- 
out proper guidance, wiU not always be directed in the 



Tigiht fashion. The ability to control emotions is best 
guided on the playing field under 'the proper direction of 
a coach or teacher. 

In the average classroom, suoh as English, Social 
Science or Physical Science, there is little opportunity 
for a person to train his emotions as seldom is he given 
a (Jhance to express them. This writer has never yet 
seen tears or laughter in a science experiment unless 
sulfuric acid escaped. 

Out-let for Tensions 

Each high school student needs an opportunity to 
express his emotions in some wholesome situation. 
Every 'high scihool child should be brought into some 
extra curriculax activity. The band, by marching and 
playing, the pep squad and the drill team and the entire 
student body have an opportunity to let off pent up 
"steam" and tension at athletic activities. There must 
be proper direction for the emotions. They are much 
like atomic power. They can be good or evil, depend- 
ing upon direction. 

It is the responsibility of administrators and teachers 
to see that emotions are guided into proper channels. 
If left unbridled they can do as much harm as good. 
All activity programs have some essence of emotional 
outiet in them, but those which have the greatest free 
outlets for emotions, by far and large are athletics and 
play. 

The adults in the community who go to athletic 
events aliso find these activities excellent outlets for 
'emotions and tensions. The person who works in a store, 
a bank or other business establishment during the 
week and has to oontrdl his emotions finds the week 
end athletic events a fine opportunity to "yeU" and 
"Whoop" and rid himself of tensions. Many psychologists 
say that "booing" and other methods of "riding" of- 
ficials usually come from a person who has to submit 
to authority all week and resents this submission so 
much that he expresses 'his resentment at someone 
else in authority when he has the opportunity. He feels 
much better after gettui'g it off his "chest." 

Train Emotions 

People must have opportunities to let tensions go, 
whether by playing the piano, working in a hobby 
shop or panticipating in/or viewing an athletic event. 
For both youth and adults, one of the greatest oppor- 
tunities for the wholesome outlet of emotions and 
tension is to be found in high school athletic and play 
programs. The important thing is to see 'that admin- 
istrators and teachers use these activities properly so 
thajt the emotions are directed into 'the proper channels. 

If we do this our citizens should be healthier, both 
mentally and physically, because they have the op- 
portujnity to express their emotions and tensions in a 
desirable way. 

—Texas Interscholastic Leader 



Page Twelve 



THE KE^STTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1968 



In Stock for 
Immediate Delivery 



The Sport Shop 



First-aid Supplies 

A.B.A. Cold Tablets 

Adhesive Tape 

Alcohol 

Am Caps 

Analgestic Liniment 

Ankle Brace 

Ankle Weights 

Ankle Wraps 

Aspirin 

Athletic Liniment 

Athletic Soap 

Ath-O-Gesic 

Atomic Balm 

Atomic Rub-Dowi> 

Band Aid 

Batter's Rosin 

Bike Tape 

Black Magic 

Body Powder 

Butterfly Tablets 

Carbonate Stick 

Cotton 

Cotton Applicators 

Cramergesic 

Dextrotabs 

Dial-A-Tab 

Dry Smelling Salt 

Elastic Wraps 

Elbow Pads 

Felt 

Firm Grip 



First Aid Kits 

Foam Rubber 

Foot Ointment 

Foot Powder 

Foot Solution 

Fung-o-spray 

Gauze 

Glare Guard 

Instant Ice 

Iso-Quin 

J & J Cream 

J & J Tape 

Kleen Ball 

Knee Braces 

Knee Pads 

Tape 

Tape Remover 

Tongue Depressors 

Towels 

Training Kits 

Tuf-Skin 

Vitamins 

Football Equipment 

Ankle Braces 
Ankle Weights 
Arm Pads 
Bleachers 

Blocking Drumming 
Center Bars 
Chain Sets 
Charging Sled 
Chin Straps 




106-110 North Race Street 
Glasgow, Kentucky 42 



Write for 1968-69 school catalogue 



1968-69 Swimming Rules Changes 

Rule II, Section la— The water temperature should 
be between 76 and 80 degrees FaJhrenheit for competii- 
tion. 

Rule II, Section 3b — Firm starting grips flush with 
the end of the pool no higher tlhan 30" must be provided 
for backstroke starts. 

Rule II, Section 4b — Some type of overhead pennants 
must be provided 15 feet from each end of tihe pool 
and seven feet above tlhe water surface for the benefit 
of the backstroke contestants. 

Rule III, Section lc4— At the starter's discretion, he 
may order the contestants to "sland up" any time 
prior to the discharge of the pistol. This allows the 
contestant to stand up or step off the block. Any con- 
testant entering the water sihall be charged with a false 
start. 

Rule VII, Section 3c — A new method of seeding and 
lane assignment has been adopted. 



Rule IX, Section 1— Rc^ 



recognized 



for performances by the contestant who swims the first 
leg of a relay race which is a regular part of such an 
approved meet only if the coach makes arrangements 
in advance with the referee. 

Rule XI, Section 1 — For each ohampionsihip contest 
there shall be a diving referee, not more than ten 
judges and a secretary. In dual competi'tion one diving 
referee and three judges are required. 

Rule XII, Section le — It Shall be considered a failed 
dive if ithe diver falls into .the water prior to assuming 
the starting position. 

Diagrams and dimensions for recommended diving 
facilities are to appear in the Swimming Guide im- 
mediately following the Springboard Diving Table. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED FOOTBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled October 25) 

If the telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given the first number is that of the home phone. 

AUgood. Russell L., Route 3, Elizabethtown, 765-6361, 769-2311 

Baliou, Robert. Route 3, Williamsburg, 549-1156 

Bowman, Earl G., 689 Mt. Vernon Drive, Lexington, 266-8111, 

255-6666 
Brooks, Michael, 115 Liberty St., Hopkinsville, 885-5192 
Callahan, Gary, 401 Skyline Park Drive, Hopkinsville. 886-5026 
Cecil. Roger. Deaton Street, Hazard, 436-6057, 436-2151 
Chiles, Marion, Clover Lane, Hopkinsville 
Dixon, Joseph Knight. Route 1, Oak Grove, 439-3970 
Downs, Ronald, 840 Burkhart Road. Paducah. 443-3098, 443-6961 
Dunn. Chesley, Jr., Route 4, Box 215. Hopkinsville 
Hamilton. Walter F., 3404 Bryan Way. Louisville. 459-5432, 

587-1121. ext. 265 
Higgins, Edward H., 1530 E. 7th St., Hopkinsville, 886-2864 
Holton. Glenn H., 121 Nelson Court, Barboursville, W. Va., 

736-6656, 529-4173. ext. 9 
Huffine. Gary L.. 241 Iroquois Drive. Paducah. 442-4125, 44^-8471 
Humphries. Gene, Gracey. 235-5162. 885-9540 
Jago, Charles, 1740 Butler Road, Hopkinsville, 886-7633 
Joiner, Bruce, 1000 Central Ave., Hopkinsville 
Mollett, Danny N., 3266 Louisa St., Catlettsburg, 739-4355, 

324-1155, ext. 376 
Morris, Jerry, 2558 Harrison, Paducah, 443-2189, 395-5531 
Peace, Richard L., 814 Tennessee Ave., Pineville, 337-2216 
Peck, Kenneth R., 404 Caramel, Hopkinsville, 886-3487, 886-3734 
" " James T., Route 1, Lafayette Road. Hopkinsville, 



104 Wayside, Hopkinsville, 886-8197 
318 Park Lane, Elizabethtown, 765-4739, 



Prrmm, 

885-9483 
Pyle, John Wayne. 
Roberts, James E., 

769-2311 
Rupp. Larry D., 3309 Wellingmoor Ave., Louisville, 451-3350, 

454-7511 
Shadle, Clark, P. O. Box 136, Barbourville, 546-4746, 546-3920 
Stewart, Roy Edward, 1872 Dunkirk Drive, Ltxington, 265-0448, 

255-0448, 255-6812, ext. 311 
Towler, Jimmy. Route 1, Cadiz 

Ward. Joseph E.. 421 Second St.. Pineville, 337-2520, 337-2650 
Wilson, Nellus R., 223 Iroquois Drive, Paducah, 443-1059, 

443-6515 
Wright, John David, 442 McLean Ave., Hopkinsville, 885-9915 



In Choosing An Insurance 

Program, Service And 

Benefits Should Always 

Be Considered First. 

Our Customers Have Found 

That They Get Full Value 

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GENERAL AGENT 



W. E. KINGSLEY J. E. McCREARY. Mgr. CHARLES C. PRICE 

Life Department 

I2M23 LAFAYEHE AVENUE LEXINGTON. KY. 40502 PHONE 254-4095 

P. O. BOX 7100 



50 YEARS 
FOR ATHLETES 

In August, 1918, our founder, Bill Hunt, was asked to help secure some 
uniforms for a football team so they c^uld tell the spectators from the 
players. 

For 50 years we at Hunt's have tried to serve the athletes by finding for 
them the best available equipment to serve their needs. 

Today we feature and can supply immediate delivery on merchandise for 
any athletic or physical education need from our warehouse. 

We have complete stock of the following items. 

Football Shoes sizes 1 to 14 

Basketball Shoes sizes 1 to 17 

Football Pants sizes 22 to 52 

Football Jerseys sizes 4 to 50 

Football Shoulder Pads sizes Little League to 50 

Basketball Jerseys sizes 10 to 50 

Basketball Pants sizes Little League to College 

Athletic Socks sizes 6 to 16 

Football Helmets sizes Boys Extra Small to 8 

Football — Rubber or Leather — Little League to Pro 

Basketballs — Indoor or Outdoor — Biddy to Pro 

Fair Plaj^ Scoreboards — Grade School to College 

First Aid for prevention or treatment 

We specialize in your problems. 

Next day delivery to any school in Kentucky. 

Call on our experience and service with your problems. 

In Mayfield, 247-1941 COLLECT, or Louisville 459-6366. 

One of us can help you. 

C. A. BYRN, Jr. — ROY BOYD — JIM MITCHELL 

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HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO., Inc. 

CH 7-1941 — PHONES — CH 7-1942 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 






HiqhkhodAthMe 



CLASS AA STATE CHAMPION HIGHLANDS 




^^ f r^^^g^^^ r-^%^^^^ >i-^^%^ 

(Left to Right) Front Row: T. Folweiler, T. Racke. P. Winkler, K. Fennell, B. Hesch. J. Evans, 

C. Fennell. D. Freer, P. Christofield, B. Deckert, N. Redd, T. Keeler. Seeond Row: G. Stephens, D. 
Sehneider, M. Wilson, S. Mnllins, J. Krentz, B. Blasco, R. Hoffman, J. McFarlan; JD. Bryant; J. Waite; 
S. McMnrray, R. Grover. Third Row: D. Kiefer, D. Stephens, M. Garrett, B. Heider, P. Xaber, J. Johnson: 

D. Hag. R. Ambrose, B. Hesch, G. Cooper, T. Heilman, C. Leftin. Fourth Row: G. Leftin, M. Barringer; 
B. Dirkes, H. Sehmitz, K. Knaebel, D. Pompilio, S. Graves, J. Wight, M. Meyers; G. Oetjen ; T. Griggs; 
T. Pogue. Fifth Row : Trainer M. Lokens. Mgr. J. Bennett, Mgr. T. Morris, D. Berry, L. Peredval, P. Pratt, 
D. Crooks, G. Collier, J. Webster, Mgr. R. Chegwidden, Trainer D. Weber, Trainer D. Smith. 



Highlands 47-Dayton 6 
Highlands 41-Westem Hills 6 
Highlands 14-Covington C9tholic 
Highlands 50-Boone County 
Highlands 53-Bellevne 



Highlands 75-Newport 12 
Highlands 40-Dixie Heights 6 
Highlands 61-Ashland 
Highlands 80-Covington Holmes 
Highlands 42-Campbell County 6 



Playoffs 



Highlands 25-Bryan Station 
Highlands 4g-Belfry 
Highlands 32-Elizabethtown 7 







Offieiai Organ of tbe 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

December, 1968 




DESALES— CLASS AAA CROSS COUNTRY WINNER 




(Left to Risrht) Front Row: Ron Pontrich, Jack Sivori, Albert Metzler. Second Row: Tom Strong, 
Sam Green, Tim Harry. Joe Bishop, Ron Green, Coach Thompson. 



OWENSBORO— CLASS aX CROSS COUNTRY WINNER 




(Left to Right) Front Row: J. T. Graddick, Mike ConkriKht. Steve PotU, Ricliard Strincer. Second 
Bow: Au't Coacli Ken Willis, Larry DeWitt, Ron Bolin, John Porter, Tony Maddox, Coach Bob Pnckett. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXXI— NO. 5 



DECEMBER, 1968 



n.OO Per Year 



Educate the Feet 

By Dr. Mohammed Sabie 

The purpose of this article is to suggest a period 
of the first two weeks of practice to educate players' 
feet before participating in the game of soccer. The 
following series of basic soccer drills is recommended 
for use with the rebound board. 

A rebound board presents a number of interesting 
possibilities in the teaching of basic soccer skills. 
It lends itself to both individual and group use, is adapt- 
able to the upright (perpendicular) as well as inclined 
posdtions, and provides a simulated gamelike ball flight 
to which students can react in various situations. As a 
teadhing aid, the rebound board can contribute to more 
effective instruction for larger groups with less expen- 
diture of class time. 

Ideally, a rebound board would be the size of a soc- 
cer goal (8 by 24). Such a board can serve a wide range 
of drills, is portable, and is rather inexpensive to con- 
struct. 

In the upright position, the rebound board is excel- 
lent as a backstop for kicking drills. Students may 
begin kicking at distances of five to ten yards, moving 
farther back as accuracy and ball control develop. 
Soft, straight kicks at short distances for the beginner 
can be foOowed in progression by more difficult kicks 
at greater distances. Painted or masked areas on the 
board can serve as target areas when emphasizing 
accuracy. 

It is in the inclined position, however, that the 
rebound board provides the greatest number of really 
unique and varied teaching situations. When slanted at 
about 45 degrees the board rebounds a kicked ball into 
the air, the trajectory depending upon the speed of the 
ball; the angle of impact upon the board. A ball re- 
bounded into the air introduces a completely new 
dimension in the organization of kicking, trapping, and 
heading drills — or any combination of these drills. In 
eadh case the student is placed in a more realistic 
context of learning. 

Trappings, for example, may be taught by intro- 
ducing first the chest trap, followed by stomach, thigh, 
and loot itraps. By adjusting the distance of students 
from the board, these skUls can be taught in terms of 
both "fly" and "bouncing" ball play situations. Also, 



by working with two groups a combination of kicking 
and trapping drills can be utilized. This necessitates 
an alignment of the groups in such a way that the ball 
kicked by one banks off the board in the general direc- 
tion of the other. Continuous motion can be achieved by 
having player 1 kick the ball, rebounding it off and up 
in the direction of player 2, who traps the ball and 
returns it by kicking direotiy to player 1. 

As the student's level of skall increases, the continu- 
ous motion aspect of drills, particularly for individuals 
and pairs, provides additional opportunity for endur- 
ance trainmg. In most drill situations the longer the 
ball is kept in motion the greater the physical demands 
placed upon the student. Even for the unskilled, when 
the board is missed completely by a hard kicked ball, 
retrieving the ball on the run can contribute to greater 
development of endurance. 

A soccer rebound board has been used by the author 
with considerable success. Students have found it to be 
challenging, stimulating, and fun. Their responses to it 
in typical teaching/learning situations have been almost 
without exception favorable and enthusiastically posi- 
tive. The brief description presented here is intended 
to suggest to the interested soccer teacher or coach a 
few of the ways in which the rebound board can be 
used. (Illustration No. 1.) 

1. One Minute Ball Control Drill: 

a. Kicking the ball against the rebound board 
should be started from behind the restraining Mne as 
shown in the diagram. 

b. The signal, "ready-go," student should continue 
to kick the ball from behind the ten foot Mne from the 
board. 

c. Your score is the nimijber of instep-kicks accom- 
plished In one minute. 

d. Compare your score with your partner's. 

e. Increase the time of the drill as you feel that 
your feet are in good shape for mastering the ball. 

f. Emphasis must be placed on instep-kick and 
never on use of a toe kick against the rebound board. 

2. Accuracy Drill: 

a. Place the ball at points A and B, about fifteen 
yards away from the board. 

b. Have the players form two Unes behind eadi 
point. 

(Osntinued on Page 6) 




Illustration No. 1 



Illustration No. 2 



Illustration No. 3 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY fflGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1968 



DECEMBER, 1968 



VOL. XXXI— NO. 5 



Published manthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

Hisrh School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication. Lexington. Ky. 40501 

Second class postage paid at Lexington. Kentucky. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 

BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Preston Holland (1965-69), Murray 

Vice-President Ralph C. Dorsey (1966-70), Horse Cave 

Directors — W. H. Crowdus (1968-71), Franklin; Morton Combs 
(1968-72). Carr Creek; Don Davis (1967-71), Independence; 
James T. Dotson (196S-72), Johns Creek: Don R. Rawlings 
(1965-69), Danville; Foster J. Sanders (1966-70), Louisville. 
Subscription Rate $1.00 per Year 



Newly Elected Board Member 



J^om the Commissioned s CJffi 



ice 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1968 Football Participation List 

2. School's Report on Football Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Football) 



Delegate Assembly Members 

Members of the Delegate Assembly at the forthcxxm- 
iiig 1969 annual meeting of the Association were elected 
by the .principals of K.H.S.A.A. member schools on bal- 
lots returned to the State Office before November 15. 
There were several ties in the voting for delegate and 
alternate. These ties were broken recently, with the 
delegates and alternates determined by lot. The names 
of the district representatives are as follows: 
Delegates 

(1) James H. PhQlips, (2) Larry Powell, (3) James 
A. Packard, (4) Howard R. Crittenden, (5) Lige Shad- 
owen, (6) W. B. Posey, (7) A. O. Richards, (8) Qetus 
Hubbs, (9) Robert E. Hancock, (10) Perry Hill, (11) 
Jesse A. Blanton, (12) Bowman Davenport, (13) Roy D 
Reynolds, (14) (3aester C. Redmon, (15) Kenneth B. 
Sidwell, (16) Undle Castle, (17) James H. Brown, (18) 
Ken Metcalf, (19) Robert L. Robertson, (20) Carl Dea- 
ton, (21) Bro. Richard Reaume (22) Robert B. aem, 
(23) Edwin K. Binford, (25) Rev. David Hazelip, (26) 
John W. Trapp, (27) Johnnie P. Lee, (29) Marvin F. 
Stewart, (30) Evan Settle, (31) Charles Scott, (32) 
Robert J. Elder, (33) Harold B. WilUams, (34) Edgar 
McNabb, (35) Robert Schneider, (36) Donald Fangman, 
(37) Paul Wright, (38) H. O. Hale, (39) Charles M. 
Hughes, (40) Clayton Taylor, (41) John Randolph, (42) 
Earl Adkins, (43) Clyde T. Lassiter, (44) Shannon Joihn- 
son, (45) Gene Middleton, (46) Sherman York, (47) 
Garva G. Wilson, (48) Qark E. Chesnut, (49) Jack L. 
LasweU, (50) Louie Martin, (51) James A. Pursifull, 
(52) Charles Hunter, (53) David H. Banks, (54) Fred W. 
Johnson, (55) Millard ToUiver, (56) GranviUe Deaton, 
(57) Gary Knight, (58) Tommy Boyd, (59) (Charles 
Wright, (60) Arthur MuUins, (61) Conrad A. Rowland, 
(62) A. Jack Fultz, (63) Bill Haines, (64) Douglas 
Cole. 

Alternates 

(1) James Voight, (2) Glenn E. Dexter, (3) Cecil 
Reid, (4) Eli Alexander, (5) Arnold S. Oaken, (6) 
Richard Vincent, (7) Lester Mimms, (8) Robert N. 
Bush, (9) Henry P. O'Bryan, (10) L. A. Wells, (11) 
Noble H. Midkiff, (12) Billy Qemmons, (13) Jim Young, 
(14) Basil Jones, (15) Jim Manion, (16) Jerome D. 
Taylor, (17) Robert Burrow, (16) C. J. Ramsey, (19) 
Sister Jamesina Spain, (20) Glenn Nixon, (21) H. L. 
Hatfield, (22) George Sauer, (23) T. T. Knight, (25) 
Robert Piaadt, (26) Arthur Draut, (27) W. K. Niman, 




W. H. Crowdus 

W. H. "Johnie" Crowdus, prindpal of the Franklin 
Junior High School, has been elected to membersihip 
on the K.H.S.A.A. Board of Control to fiU out the un- 
expired term of Alvin Almond. In balloting which 
ended on October 30, Mr. Crowdus defeated Supt. Dar- 
rell Carter of Monroe County Scshools. 

Mr. Crowdus was a member of the Board during 
the 1954-62 period, and as Board President in 1961-62. 
A native of Franklui, he received degrees from Western 
Kentucky University and Indiana University. 

From 1935 to 1942 Mr. Crowdus worked at Western 
as trainer and assistant in the Physical Education 
Department. He served in ifihe U. S. Navy during the 
1942-45 period. In Franklin Junior High Sdiool he 
started teaching in ithe field of Health and Physical 
Education. He became principal of the school in 1953. 
He has coached high school football, basketball Eind 
golf. 

In 1943 Mr. Crowdus married Miss Ina Bledsoe of 

HiseviUe. He is a past chairman of the Franklin Meth- 
odist Church Officaal Board, and is current associate 
district layleader of the Bowling Green district. He is 
a past president of the Franklin Rotary Club. In May 
of 1961 he received from Radio Station W.K.A.Y. at 
Glasgow a plaque for being the Southern Kentuckian 
who had done the moist for sports in 1960-61. He is 
chairman of the new FranWin-Simpson Memorial Hos- 
pital Board. He is a member of numerous professional 
organizations. 

(29) John F. Games, (30) Richard Greenwell, (31) 
James B. Edwards, (32) Jack WiUdams, (33) BiU 
Prewitt, (34) Martin Hils, (35) Bro. Mark Sullivan, 
(36) Ken Shields, (37) William Nutter, (38) Terry 
Cummins, (39) Sister M. Jude, (40) John Crockett, (41) 
Chrales Furr, (42) Zeb Blankenship, (43) John L. 
Smith, (44) Elwood Daughertj', (45) James Ledford, 
Jr., (46) Ron Chumbley, (47) Denton Ping, (48) Ray- 
mond Reed, (49) Jerry Hacker, (50) P. M. Broughton, 
(51) C. E. Calloway, (52) O. G. Roaden, (53) William 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1968 



Page Thre« 



D. Back, (54) Albert Combs, (55) Vesper Singleton, (56) 
Larry Sturgill, (57) Paul W. Trimble, (58) Pete Grigsby, 
Jr., (59) Arson Justice, (60) James V. Powdl, (61) 
Henry E. Cochran, (62) William N. Collins, (63) Wade 
D. "^omack, (64) Wm. H. Holbrook. 

Minutes of Meeting 

K.H.S.A.A. Wrestling Committee 

Lexington, Kentucky, October 19, 1968 

The K.H.S.A.A. Wrestling Committee, meeting in the 
Association office on October 19, 1968, was called to 
order at 10:30 A.M. by Chairman Orville Williams. The 
reading of the minutes of the previous meeting was 
waived since the mdnutes had appeared in the ATH- 
LETE. 

There was a discussion concerning the 1967-68 re- 
gional tournaments. Committee members seemed satis- 
fied except for a possible weakness in the regional 
seeding and attendance of coaches or their representa- 
tives at tthe seeding meetings. 

It was reported by the Commissioner that schools with 
wrestling teams which did not sponsor teams last year 
were: A'hrens, Henderson County, Henry County, Johns 
Creek. Madisonville-North Hopkins, North Marshall, and 
St. Xavier. 

A starting date for the season was discussed. Mr. 
Sanford pointed out that no other sport has this other 
than to state that the season starts as of the first day of 
school. He also stated that the Committee could recom- 
mend changes in tournament or meet rules only. The 
(Committee through its Oiairman may wish to submit 
proposals to the Delegate Assembly, going through the 
Board of Control or through principals of K.H.S.A.A. 
member schools. 

The following changes in wrestling regulations were 
suggested by the Committee: 

1. Before the first meet a team must have at least 
10 days of practice. 

2. The wrestling season should end with the State 
Tournament. 

3. A boy may participate in 16 dual matches and 4 
multiple school meets or tournaments excluding the 
Regional and State tournaments. 

4. The heavyweiglit class should be limited to 235 
lbs. 

There was a discussion or rules changes made for 
the 1968-69 season. Attention was called to the fact that 
A^ociation regulations provide that The Interscholastic 
Wre<;tling Rules as given in the "Official Collegiate 
Scholastic Wre9*^ling Guide" are to be used. 

It was decided that Wrestle-backs shall be at the 
state level but at the regional level only if all coaches 
m that region agree. The Riding Time is to be the same 
as that oi last year. The Weight Control and Certifioa- 
tion also remain the same. 

The following qualifications were adopted for region- 
al seeding: 

1. The boy must have wrestled a minimum of 8 
matches. 

2. Out of these 8, 5 matches must be between differ- 
ent opponents. 

3. Four matches must be wrestled in his region. 

4. Four of the 8 must be with different opponents in 
his certified weight class. 

5. Two of these 4 in (4) must be with opponents in 
his region and at his certified weight class. 

Seeding formula: 8-5-4-4-2. 

Certification forms will be mailed out by the State 
Office. 

There was a discussion of this year's Slate Tourna- 
ment. It win be held at the Trinity High School, Louis- 
ville. The draw is to be made by formula at the 
K.H.S.A.A. office, one draw being made for all 12 
weight classes. 

There was an agreement on the following with re- 



spect to Forfeit and Bye: 

1. If a boy is unable to wrestle in his place, won 
and seeded by his region, in the State Tournament, his 
opponent shall receive a forfeit. 

2. If a boy is unable to wrestle in the region after 
being seeded, all seeded boys will move up one seed to 
fill the gap .If there should be an odd man left, he shall 
receive a bye. 

Wrestling clinics are to be held, witti times, places 
and dates to be announced soon. 

Under new business the Commissdoner stated that 
no Coach-of-the-Year trophy or Regional Coaoh trophy 
may be given, as a matter of K.H.S.A.A. policy, unless 
such an award may be made by an organization of wres- 
tling coaches or by the Kentucky High School Coaches 
Association. 

The meeting adjourned at 1:30 P.M. 

Robert Weenolsen, Recording Secretary 

Minutes of Meeting 
K.H.S.A.A. Gymnastics Committee 

The meeting was held Thursday, November 7, 1966, 
at 7:30 p.m. at the Kentucky High School Athletic Asso- 
ciation Building. 

Members present: Theo. Sanford, Barney Groves, 
George Jefferson, Thomas Mahanes, Robert Wason, 
Bernard Johnson. 

George Jefferson gave a report on the Gymnastics 
Coaches meeting that was held in Louisville during the 
KAHPER Fall Conference on November 1, 1968. The 
report indicated that the coaches were enthusiastic 
about ♦'he coming gymnastics season. The coaches asked 
that two problems be presented to the State Gymnastics 
Committee: first, the problem of very yoimg children 
competing in the State Meet; and second, the problem 
of participants competing in the State Meet represent- 
ing their school without actUcdly liaving a school gym- 
nastics team. 

Mr. Sanford presented to the committee the back- 
ground of the two problems mentioned above. He stated 
that tliese two problems were not new and that several 
other sports sponsored by the KHSAA had progressed 
through these same "growing pains" and had survived. 

After a discussion, the committee felt that the first 
problem of the very young children participating in the 
state meet would exist only for a short time, hence no 
action was taken. The second problem of participants 
competing in the State Meet without actually having a 
school gymnastics team could be resolved by changing 
the KHSAA Gymnastics Oiampionship Rules which 
were established by the Gymnastics Committee. 

Mr. Sanford revealed the fact that seven additional 
schools had listed gymnastics as a competitive sport 
for the 1968-69 school year. 

It was established that the State Gymnastics Meet 
would be held in Lexington on April 5, 1969. 

Due to the increase in number of schools competing 
in gymnastics, and due to the tact ttiat Bonnie Rowe 
had indicated that she could no longer serve on the 
State Gymnastics Committee it was recommended to 
Mr. Sanford that Sheila Kuhlman, Doss High School, 
and Mrs. Terry Tune, Southern Junior High School, be 
added to the committee. 

The committee discussed the possibility of 'having a 
number of gymnastics clinics. A judges clinic was tenta- 
tively scheduled in Lexington for December 7, pending 
availability of people to conduct the clinic. Additional 
information concerning clinics is to be announced at a 
later date. 

The possibility of scheduling the State Meet at an 
earlier date was discussed; however, no action was* 
taken. 

The meeting adjourned ait 9:45 p.m. 

Chairman, State Gymnastics Com. 
Bernard M. Johnson 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1968 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 

REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled November 27) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it 
is the home phone unless otherwise designated. If two num- 
bers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 
Abshire, Ronnie Eugene. Phyllis. 835-4473 
Ackerman, Joseph F., Jr., 2904 Noe Court, Louisville, 469-426S, 

464-0431 
Aker, David D., 1018 Fairlane Drive, Vanceburg, 796-2067, 

796-2067 
Anderson, Henry M.. Route 3, Owensboro, 785-4468. 229-4193 
Bailey, Gaar J.. 6205 Van Court, Fern Creek, 239-3769, 

637-4731 
Barnes, Jim C, 148 Surfside Drive, Apt. 4, Lexington 
Bashford. William, Route 4, Mt. Sterling, 498-0176, Lexington 

265-3612 
Baugh, Rodney D., 441 Oak St., Ludlow, 581-6995, 681-6886 
Bienick, Stan, 11702 Harden Court, Cincinnati. Ohio 
Birchfield. Daniel R., 811 Broadway, Irvine, 723-3944, 233-2000, 

ext. 3685 
Blazier. Bea, 3406 Koressel Ave., Evansville, Ind., 426-3770 
Boling, Danny L.. Route 2, Owensboro, 684-1762 
Bollam, Kenneth A.. 12 S. Halsey Circle. Fort Campbell, 

798-2260, 798-8252 
Bradford, Bob, 76 Southview, Fort Thomas, 781-1217, 733-5600 
Bramble, James L., 153 Manitoba Lane, Lexington, 277-9477, 

264-1461, ext. 212 
Brangers. Larry, P. O. Box 634, Elizabethtown, 766-6628, 

4-6946 
Brooks, Mike, 116 Liberty St., Hopkinsville 

Brooks. Steve, Leestown Road. Frankfort, 223-0361, 223-056B 
Brown, Bix, 1013 Darley Drive, Lexington 
Brown, J. W. "Scoop," 976 Waverly, Lexington, 252-0954. 

252-3212 
Burd, Robert T., 403 Westwood Drive, Middletown, 246-4848, 

245-4848 
Burton, Charles W., N. Highway 1247, Somerset, 679-3571, 

681-1920 
Butcher, Stephen, Pikeville College, Pikeville, 437-4586 
Callahan, Gary, 401 Skyline Park Drive, Hopkinsville 
Cantrell. Hubert E., 117 Hill-n-Dale, Lancaster, 792-3071, 

792-3071 
Carman, Morris Lee, Hardinsburg, 547-2750 
Chiles. Marion, Route 2. Clover Lane. Hopkinsville 
Clater. James E., 606 Broadway, Elizabethtown, 769-1617, 

828-2611 
Cochran, Ray Delano, Win, 297-3135 
Collins, James R.. Jr.. 716 Haverhill Drive, Lexington. 

277-3194, 277-3977 
Conley, Ted L., 4725 Nottingham Court, Ashland, 325-3232, 

324-1426 
Cooksey, Harold D., 1714 Gagel. Apt. 13, Louisville, 937-9781, 

464-7611, ext. 4522 
Cooper, Norris, 218 Dean St.. Bowling Green 
Costigan, Jimmy, Route 1. Mt. Sterling. 498-J215 
Cox, Cortland K.. 204 Patterson Ave., Hodgenville, 358-3413, 

358-4111 
Craft, Bruce E., 2418 Henderson, Ashland, 324-8622, 324-1111, 

ext. 8265 
Crawford. Jerry D.. Suzanne Street. Lawrenceburg, 839-6333 
Creekmore, Les, 316 Walnut St., Bellevue, 431-5259, 421-2283 
Crook, Bill. Route 2. Box 175. 528-6277 

Cunningham, Billy H.. 40 S. Halsey Circle, CBA, Fort Camp- 
bell, 798-6367, 798-8281 
Damron, Charles E., Jr., Wolford Street, Pikeville, 432-3409, 

437-7007 
Davenport, Bowman, P. O. Box 62, Clarkson, 269-3660, 

242-3061 
Davis. Harold T.. P. O. Box 191, Beaver Dam, 274-4169, 

276-6121 
Day, Charles R., 202 Marmak Drive, Glasgow, 661-3905. 

434-2911 
Dening, David F., 1602 Jennifer Road, Lexington, 299-2763 
Diachenko. Nick, 808 Halbert, Vanceburg, 796-2823 (Bus.) 
Dieterle. Owen M.. 638 Meadow Lane, Versailles, 873-3746 
Dixon, Joe K., Route 1, Oak Grove 
Dixon, Ronald R., 156 Julia Drive, Milton, Fla., 623-6231. 

623-3643. ext. 491 
Donoho, Eddie, 139 Davis, Glasgow, 651-8301 (Bus.) 
Dunn, Chesley, Route 4, Box 215, Hopkinsville 
Eary, Edward B., Jr.. 1212 Octavian Circle, Lexington, 

266-2677, 277-6116, ext. 310 
Edwards. Richard A.. 2608 Duke Drive, Apt. A-D, Owensboro, 

684-0866. 683-9061 
Elliott. Carlos N., 2409 Vinedale, Louisville, 459-3587, 582-2621 
Everitt, Thomas Eugene, 12121^ Fontaine Road, Lexington, 

266-0662 
Faris, Leon W., Martin Hall, Box 280. E.K.U.. Richmond. 

623-9725, Lexington 233-2000, ext. 3686 
Faris. Nelson L., 1616 Cypress, Paris, 987-1247. 987-1247 
Force, Kenneth I., Main Street, Bedford, Lexington 266-3147. 

266-7272 



In Memoriam 




Louis C. Litchfield 



Louis C. LLtohfield, 58, well-known Kentucky educa- 
tor and former President of the K.H.S.A.A. Board of 
Control, died at Caldwell County War Memorial Hospi- 
tal, Princeton, on November 5, 1968. 

A member of the teaching profession for 35 years, 
Mr. Litchfield retired three years ago after serving as 
Crittenden County superintendent for iten years. Later 
he served as principal of Lyon County Elementary 
Sdiool, and this year he was acting as supervisor of 
teachers for Caldwell County High School. 

A graduate of Mu'Tay State University, Mr. Litdi- 
field had spent his entire life in 'tihe teadhing profession. 
At one time he was a member of the Board of Regents 
at Murray State. He was a high school coach for several 
years, and was a state basketball tournament referee 
many times. He was a member of the K.H.S.A.A. 
Board during the 1953-61 period, being Prraddent in 
1960-61. 

Mr. Litchfield was an active member of the Marion 
Baptist Church and was a deacon at the time of his 
death. For several years he served as superintendent of 
the adult department of the Sunday School. 

Survivors are his wife, Birdie; one daughter, Mrs. 
Mike Vaughan of Mt. Vernon, HI.; a son, Louis Ches- 
teen, Jr., of Louisville; mother, Mrs. Betty Litchfield, 
Blackford; one sister, Mrs. Al Conley, Jacksonville, 
Fla.; three brothers, Milbum litohfield. Clay, Henry 
Litdhfield, IndiEmapolis, and Marx Litdifield of Califor- 
nia. 



Foster, David H., 

233-8322 
Fulkerson. James R.. 1611 Navajo, Owensboro, 684-6458 
Fuller, Dick, Wyandot Way, Mt. Sterling, 498-6218, 498-2669 
Furnish, Gary L., Lewis Trailer Court, No. 14, Morehead, 

784-7646 
Gaines, Harvey, 762 S. 43rd, Louisville, 774-4066, 896-3401. 

ext. 323 
Gamblin, Jesse 

821-9040 
Gibbons, Mike, 2733 
Gibson. Fred. 696 

821-8604 

Gillispie, John P., North College Street, Wilmore, 868-381S 
Gilmore. Stephen E., 819 Ashland Ave.. Ashland. 324-1752, 

324-6911 
Gray, Steven H., 4811 Dover Road, Louisville, 447-3163 
Gulley, Lurid, 624 Burbank Court, Lexington 
Hackett, Wilbur L., Sr., 1472 Olive St., Louisville, 772-0493, 

454-7611. ext. 3643 
Hale, Robert V., 346 Linden Walk, Lexington, 265-2171 
Hall, Jack R., Fifth Street. Elkhorn City, 764-7981 (Bus.) 
Hall, William W., 474 S. Highland, Frestonsburs, 886-3416, 

886-3648 



1425 Huntsville Drive, Lexington, 299-9760, 



H., 205 Dake St., Earlington, 3S3-6391, 



Carolyn, Ashland. 324-2056. 324-2066 
Lightfoot Lane, Madisonville, 821-2636, 



THE KENTUCKY fflGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1968 

ELIZABETHTOWN— CLASS AA FINALIST 



Page Five 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Dennis Shacklett. Chnckie Ratcliffe. Richard Tyson, .lohn Hartman, Larry 
Daniels, Don Worthington, Allen Dailey, Mickey Watts, Wayne Bailey, Robert Ricketts. Roy Emerick, 
J m Berry. Second Row: Ernie Lewis, Doug Sexton. Tommy Welsh, Gene Nowlin. Dale Aiken. John Gaf- 
ford, Stuart Davis. John Adams. Donnie Walters. Mike Harmon. Freddy Watts. Third Row: Jerome How- 
ard, Jim DeSpain. Bill Hayes, Tom Brandenburg. Brad Plant, Ricky Caswell, Wade Johnson, Bill Brad- 
ford. Jerry Decker. Dennis Taylor, Edward Thompson. Fourth Row: Doug Barnes. Garland Carter, Mark 
Epperson, Jackie Dupin, Ricky Thomas, John Zcitz, Carl Williams, Nathan Clem, Dale Payton. 

OWENSBORO— CLASS AA, REGION I, DISTRICT 2, CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: (;. Greenfield. Larry Cabert. David Midkiff. Steve Gilbert, 
Hamric, Mike Jennings, Terry Gabert, Phillip Normand, Dale Fulkerson, Tommy Brown, 
Douglas. Bruce Coombs, Jimmy Ruth. Hubert Robinson. Mike Fritch. David Tolliver. Second Row: 
Worth, Trainer Joe Iracane, George Leak, John Barron, Alfred Thompson, Danny Hocker. James 
John Humphrey, Kevin McDonald. Robbie Hocker. Bernie Strawn. .lerry Johnson. Eddy Smith, 
Catina. Mike Sturgeon, Mike Phelps. Coach Netoskie. Coach Jack Poynter. Coa.ch VanWinkle. 
Coach Gerald Poynter. Third Row: Bobby Whitmer. Barry Beeler, Scott Swift. Richard 



Mike 
David 
John 
Bvrd, 
Nick 
Head 
Sears, 



Mark Lionberger. David Phillips. Steve Waltrip, Henry K'ekendal. Frankie Riley, Robert Fleming, 
Steve Freeman, Wayne Lee, Steve Kirkpatrick, Steve Snedeker. John Cowhard. Sherman Cowhard. 
Fourth Row : Mgrs. Freddie Stevens, David Wilson, Darrell Webber. 



Hamilton. Dale Everett, Route No. 1, Box 456, Pikeville, 

437-7842 
Hammons, J. S., 107 Sycamore Street, Barbourville, 546-4720 
Hannah, Fred H., Asbury College, Box 240, Wilmore. 858-9987, 

858-9987 
Harjo, Austin Amos, 108 Airport Road, Clarksville, Tenn., 

431-3781 
Hauser. Bobby, Evans Lane. Clinton, 653-6743, 653-6410 
Hay, Mike, Todd Hall, Box 316, Eastern Kentucky Univer- 
sity, Richmond, 623-9947 
Hayden. John O., 1624 Stafford Ave., Louisville, 367-8662, 

634-1511, ext. 77 
Hayes, Bob, Wurtland. Russell 836-5971 
Higgins, Bob, 707 Cherokee Drive, Madisonville, 821-1869, 

821-2824 
Hobgood. Jerry L., P. O, Box 213, Sebree, 835-2332, 639-2651 
Hornsby, Colin, 852 Montgomery, Ashland. 325-7557. 324-1111, 

ext. 6249 
Hummel. Thomas. 235 East Fifth St., Newport, 681-8888, 

441-7102 
Humphries, Gene, Gracey 



Hurley, Robert, P. O, Box 244, Williamson, W. Va. 

Huter. James J., 3643 Vermont, Louisville, 776-0707, 582-2613 

Ireland. Jan L., 1310 College, Bowling Green, 842-6708, 

842-6708 
Jackson, Gary D.. 1705V4 Farmer. Murray. 753-5979 
Jago, Charles, 1740 Butler Road, Hopkinsville 
Jeffers. James T., 118'^ Kennedy Ave., Apt. 2. Louisville 
Johnson. Bill I,,ee. Monroe Drive, Russell, 836-4226 
Johnson, Henry Sig, 575 Mayfield Highway, Benton, 527-9827, 

627-6601 
Johnson. Robert S., Anbury College. Box 422, Wilmore, 

85»-9971. 85.S-9y71 
Joiner, Bruce. 7 000 Central Ave., Hopkinsville 
Jones. Bobby, Route 1. Box 27S. Manchester, 598-5163, 598-2'129 
Kelley, Harold M.. P. (). l!<ix 343, Hart Hall, Murray. 762-4692 
Kitchen. Leslie. 1701 Linily Lane. Lexington. 255-6062 
Knauer, Glen M.. 2912 Yorkshire Blvd., Louisville, 458-6388, 

896-88X7 
Kouns. Robert H., P. O. Box 582, South Shore, 932-4540 

932-3323 
Lacy, DirschI Clay. C-204. Shawneetown, Lexington, 278-4490 

(Contanue(i on Page Eleven) 



Page Sdx 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1968 



The Flying Dutchman 

There's a letter on my desk from Columbus, Ohio, 
saying that Colonel Paul E. Landis will retire from his 
commissioner's posdtion on October 31, 1969, and will 
"pass tlie torch" on to another Kentucky Colonel, Har- 
old Meyer, who has been Paul's associate commissioner 
for several years. Here are two really great guys — in 
case you haven't met them. Colonel Meyer was formerly 
a school superintendent at Mantins Ferry, the home of 
Lou and Alex Groza. What do high school athletic com- 
missioners do when they retire? Paul says that after 
forty-six years on the job he needs some time for more 
fun like golf and fishing in Kentucky and elsewhere. 
From (the Dutchman to you, Colonel Landis— after you 
golf and fish in Kentucky, "elsewhere" will cease to be 
attractive. 

It's Christmas time again in Kentucky! You've got 
to start thinking about giving presents and this Dutch- 
man is about to suggest a Christmas present which will 
bring joy to the lad to whom you give it, as well as a 
certain inner peace and contentment to you the whole 
new year through. Give of yourself, your time and your 
energy, unselfishly to a discouraged, crippled kid who 
lives in your community; teach him the 'Game Guy's 
Prayer' and get him a Lionheart Award so he can qual- 
ify for the Game Guy Award of 1969. Right now, write 
the Dutchman, Box 36, Jeffersontown, Kentucky, telling 
him the story of the boy or girl you are nominating for 
Game Guy of 1969. This could be the most rewarding 
year of your Ufe, especially if, in your work with the 
physically handicapped, you carry through the philoso- 
phy of St. Francis of Assisi which follows: 

"Lord, make me the instrument of Your peace. 

Where there is hatred may I bring love; 

Where there is malice may I bring pardon; 

Where there is discord may I bring harmony; 

"Where there is error may I bring truth; 
Where there is doubt may I bring fciith; 
Where there is despair may I bring hope; 
Where there is darkness may I bring Your light; 
Where there is sadness may I bring joy. 

"O, Master, may I seek not so much to be comforted 

as to comfort. 
To be imder stood as to understand. 
To be loved as to love, 
For it is in giving that we receive. 
It is in losing our lives that we shall find them. 
It is forgiving that we shall be forgiven, 
It is in dying that we shall rise up to eternal life." 
Maurice Stiff, one of Kentucky's outstanding officials, 
has called attentoin to the outstanding unselfish service 
which "Ole Reliable" Bill Varble of Louisville has been 
providing for more than four decades. It was my old 
friend, BiU Varble, who gave "Mo" Stiff his start in 
officiating, as he did for niEuiy others. The old master 
now has racked up 32 years in officiating in Kentucky 
and it is high time Bill gets some recognition. So it is 
that Bill Varble, one of the finest gentiemen ever to 
blow a whistle, becomes the winner of the Com Cob 
Pipe of Honor for the Christmas month of December. 
Bill, you've left your footprints in the sands of time. 

Here are some "thank you" letters from Bowling 
Green's Nick Denes, and Bellarmine's Eddie Weber, for 
the Com Cob Pipes of Honor they have received. At 
Christmas time just hearing from fellows like Nike and 
Eddie makes the season a merry one for your EKitch 
reporter. 

Mciny telephone calls and letters from the Dutch- 
man's friends have come from every nook and cranny 
of Kentucky asking, "When you give up your basket- 



ball cUnics, will you also give up (1) writing your Flying 
Dutchman column in the Athlete; (2) wUl you continue 
to send out the Corn Cob Pipes of Honor, Abou Ben 
Adhem, Lionheart and Game Guy Awards; (3) how wiU 
Ted and Joe Billy train basketball officials in the future? 
The answer to number 1 question is, yes; to number 2 
question is, yes, and to number 3 question is, that you 
can depend on the Commissioner's office to meet every 
problem head on and to come up with a solution. As 
long as the Dutdimcin lives, those Game Guys and 
Unselfish Guys are going to be recognized and honored. 

As the Dutchman concludes his Christmas column, 
his thoughts go back to the year 1960 when he directed 
the White House Study of Recreation in Kentucky. At 
tha' time I asked distinguished leaders of various 
fields of endeavor to quote briefly their first thoughts at 
the mention of recreation. Here they are: 

A Judge: "Many boys join gangs because they 
never had chances to join teams." 

A Teacher: "Learning to play is as important as 
learning to write." 

A Policeman: "A playground is a wonderful safety 
zone." 

A Minister: "Recreation wiU not cure delinquency 
but it is a big weapon against it." 

A Criminologist: "Spend more on recreation and 
you'll spend less on jails." 

A School Superintendent: "Children who have a good 
place to play after school seldom play hooky." 

A Parent: "My Child's leisure time activities are as 
important to me as his time spent in home, school £ind 
church." 

If a child's leisure time is important to parents, then 
it is their duty to insist that wholesome recreation be 
developed to supplement, not replace, the work of the 
home, school and church. 

MERRY CHRISTMAS 



EDUCATE THE FEET 

(Continued from Page One) 

c. Students are given 5 trials each, using the instep- 
kick toward the rebound board. 

d. Players in line A are to kick with the left foot; 
players in line B are to kick with the right foot. 

e. Scoring is measured as the total sum of the ten 
trials. 

3. Run and Kick Against the Rebound Board from 
Fifteen Yards Distance: 

a. Use a rebound board. 

b. The instructor centers the ball to the student 
who is standing in front of the rebound board from a 
distance of about twenty yards. 

c. Student at first traps the baR, second begins 
dribbling the ball up to the fifteen yard line distance as 
shown in the picture. 

d. At the fifteen yard line distance, the student 
shoots against the rebound board. 

e. Scoring is measured as the total of the ten trials. 
(Illustration No. 2.) 

4. Two players kicking drill: 

a. Pair of students are needed for this drill. 

b. One student kicks the ball in such a way that it 
banks in the direction of the second student. 

c. By exercising control, student 1 attempts to 
make the ball terminate its roll at the feet of student 2. 

d. Student 2, in tum, may kick the ball back to 
student 1. 

e. Move up as ball comes back in an angle and 
play it hack on the rebound board by using the instep- 
kick. 

f. Use either foot in kicking. (lUusitration No. 3.) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1968 



Page Seven 



DANVILLE— CLASS AA, REGION 2. DISTRICT 2. CHAMPION 




D <iw N V i i- u 6 H r O- M^ e C M bo w - i ^ 



(L«ft to Rigrht) Front Row: Joe Cotton, Herbie Hawes. Tommy Hnnstad. Randy Scholtzv Brad 
Yonnv, John Ruisdell, Steve Lovell. Nick Barker, Mike Wafford. Second Row : Theo. Cotton, Danny 
B«n, Pat Yankey, Bernie Hnnstad, Jim Ely, David Reardon, Glenn Furr, Jim Reynierson , Tommy 
Coatea, Eddie Lane. Third Row: Palmer Durham, Rudy Brittain. Ken Lovell, Riosrer McAnly, Brian 
O'Malley, Lea Letton, John Stags:, Tony Strang-e, Leonard Coulter. Fourth Row: Ronn<e Stamps, 
John Albright, Richard Sanders. Glen Simpson, Jerry Milburn, Bill Ruth, Bobby MeG-nnis, Joey 
Frankel, Joe Stallworth, Carl Schwienfurth. Fifth Row: Donnie Hanks, Shoun Kerbaugh, Dale 
Taylor, David Reed, Bruce Feather, Ronnie Morris, Keith Chambers. Clay Webber. 

PADUCAH TILGHMAN— CLASS AA. REGION I, DISTRICT I. CHAMPION 




(Left to Richt) Front Row: Gary McDouEal, Mike Williams, Bob Page, Joe Wilson, Larry 
Crockett, Calder Ezzell, Richard Harriford, Rick Hiffhers. Bob Lichtenbers. Ron Kelly, Don Harris, 
Byron Williams, Mike McDowell, Stan Jones, Rocky Lee. Second Row : Bob Florence, Don Harri- 
ford, Joe Pace, Randy Sharp, Terry Bishop, John Harris, Alan Smith, Bill Backus. Mike Barwell, 
Paul Coltharp, Walter Hamilton, Weldon Stokes, Jessee Caskey, Steve Cummings, Dennis Wright, 
Ricky Kelly, Carl Ligon. Third Row: Jonathan Hines, Mike Starks, Don Deweese, Winston Hughes, 
James Goodman, Richard Lichtenberg, Bumham Jones, Lin Roof. Dan Williamson, Joe Noble, 
Chuck McClain, John Hackney, Greg Allen, Aundry Ligon, Curly Simmons, Gary Lichtenberg, Marc 
Diamond. Grant Hughes, Dennis Williamson. Fourth Row: Aaron Crafton, Rex Holland, Gary Moore, 
Joe Vaughn, Charles Watson, Wendell Gray, John Golliher, Steve Clymer, Wilbum Wright, Bob 
Bowland, Stan Hall, Bill Gamer, Donas Walking, Stan Braboy, Henry Paul, Mitchell Scott, Ken 
Brewer, Thomas Grubbs, Ken Knight, Marcus Malray. 



Wrestling Assignments 

The continued increase in the number of Wrestling 
teams makes it necessary to establish regions in this 
sport. The assignments are as follows: 

Fort Campbell Region— Bowling Green, Caldwell 
County, Chrisitiian County, Fort Campbell, Franklin- 
Simpson, Hendenson County, Hopkinsville, Madisonville- 
North Hopkins, North Hardin, North Marshall, Trigg 
County 

East Jefferson Region— Ourrett, Eastern, Fern 
Creek, Heniy County, Jeffersontown, Oldham County, 
Seneca, Wesitport 

West Jefferson Region— Ahrens Trade, Flaget, Ken- 
tuclQ' School for the Blind, Louisville Country Day, 
Pleasure Ridge Park, St. Xavier, Trinity, VaMey, Wag- 
gener. Western 



Lexington Region— Boone County, Bryan station, 
Campocu Oounty, Oanviue, Frankfort, Johns Creek, 
Kentucky School for the Deaf, Lafayette, MLUensburg 
Military Institute, Newport Catholic, Woodtord County 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED FOOTBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled November 28) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it 
is the home phone unless otherwise designated. If two num- 
bers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Asher, Ralph, Woodside. Olive Hill, 286-4537, 286-2081 
Hu.ley. Kul.ort, V. O. Box 244. Williamson, W. Va. 
Miller, Eddie Nelson, 1000 Crest, Corbin, 628-8667, 528-4646 
Rogers. Eldridge, 310 Talbert. Hopkinsville, 886-6671, 886-8921 
Shumate, Fred R., 1738 Charles St., Portsmouth, Ohio, 

363-5468 
West, John, Cottonwood Drive, Hickman, 236-3296, 236-2621 



Plage Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1968 



Official Dickinson Ratings For The 1968 Football Season 



CLASS A 

REGION I 
District 1 
Team W 

1. Fulton 6 

2. Murray 4 

3. Russellville 3 

4. North Marshall 3 

6. Trigg County 3 

6. Fort Campbell 1 

7. Crittenden County 

8. Fulton County 

District 2 

1. Glasgow 6 

2. Tompkinsville 6 

3. Butler County 6 

4. Campbellsville 5 

5. •Caverna 4 

6. Metcalfe County 4 

7. Warren County 2 

8. Cumberland County 2 

9. Greensburg 1 

10. North Warren 

•Defeated Metcalfe County 

REGION II 
District 1 

1. Bardatown 6 

2. Old Kentucky Home 4 

3. Lebanon 2 

4. Eminence 4 

6. Kentucky Military Institute 2 

5. Louisville Country Day 2 

6. Shelbyville 2 

5. Washington County 2 

9. Shepherdsville 1 

10. Henry County 

District 2 

1. Frankfort 3 

2. Stanford 5 

3. Anderson 4 

3. Scott County 3 

5. Sayre 5 

6. Berea 4 

7. Harrodsburg 3 

8. Garrard County 2 

9. Kentucky School for the Deaf 1 

10. Mercer County 2 

11. Georgetown 1 

12. Burgin 

13. Boyle County 

REGION III 
District 1 

1. Dayton 6 

2. Beechwood 4 

3. Lloyd 3 

4. Bellevue 

5. Ludlo^K 2 

6. Carroll County 1 

7. Owen County 1 

District 2 

1. Mt. Sterling 6 

2. Montgomery County 4 

3. MaysviUe 3 

4. Paris 3 

4. Millersburg Military Institute 3 

6. Bath County 4 

7. Rowan County 2 

8. Fleming County 1 

9. Nicholas County 

REGION IV 
District 1 

1. 'Lynch 4 

1. Harlan 3 

3. Williamsburg 4 

4. Lynn Camp 3 

B. Pineville 2 

6. London 3 

7. Lily 3 

8. Hazel Green 1 

9. Mt. Vernon 

•Won on Tie Breaking System 
District 2 

1. McKell 4 

2. Jenkins 5 

3. Louisa 6 

4. •Elkhom City B 



L 


T 


Rating 








2B.00 


1 





21.2B 


1 


1 


19.B0 


2 


1 


17.92 


3 





16.67 


B 





11.67 


6 





10.00 


2 





N.R. 








25.00 


1 





21.26 


n 





20.00 


2 





18.57 


4 





IB.OO 


4 





15.00 


fi 





12.60 


7 





12.22 


fi 





11.43 


6 





10.00 








27. BO 


1 


1 


21.88 


1 


1 


19.38 


2 





18.34 


3 





14.00 


3 





14.00 


3 





14.00 


3 





14.00 


B 


1 


12.14 


B 


1 


10.83 





1 


23.13 





1 


20.62 


n 





20.00 


1 





20.00 


1 





19.17 


2 





18.34 


B 





IB.OO 


3 





14.00 


2 


1 


13.75 


5 





12.86 


B 





11.67 


a 


1 


11.25 


5 





10.00 








25.00 


1 





19.00 


1 





18.7B 


4 


1 


13.75 


4 





13.33 


3 


1 


13.00 


3 





12. BO 








27.50 


1 





21.25 


2 


1 


19. B8 


2 


1 


18.76 


1 





18.76 


4 





16.25 


3 





14.00 


B 





11.67 


7 





10.00 





1 


23.13 





1 


23.13 


2 





19.17 


2 





17.00 


3 





16.00 


4 





16.71 


3 





15.00 


4 





12.00 


8 





10.00 








26.00 








22.50 


1 





21.26 


1 





20.00 



5. Paintsville 6 

6. Raceland 3 

7. Fleming-Neon 3 

8. Johns Creek 3 

9. Wurtland 2 

10. Wheelwright 2 

11. Pikeville 2 

11. Virgie 1 

13. Catlcttsburg 1 

14. Morgan County 

IB. Mullins 

♦Defeated Paintsville 

CLASS AA 

REGION I 
District 1 
Team W 

1. Paducah Tilghman 3 

2. Mayfield 3 

3. Franklin Simpson 3 

4. Hopkinsville 1 

5. Caldwell County 2 

6. Bowling Green 2 

7. Christian County 

District 2 

1. Owensboro 6 

2. Madisonville 6 

3. Henderson 4 

4. *Daviess County 3 

B. Owensboro Catholic 3 

6. Henderson County 2 

7. Ohio County 1 

8. Union County 1 

♦Defeated Owensboro Catholic 
REGION II 
District 1 

1. •Elizabethtown 6 

2. LaRue County 6 

3. Meade County 4 

4. Fort Knox 3 

B. Oldham County 2 

6. North Hardin 2 

7. Breckinridge County 

7. Shelby County 

•Defeated Larue County 

District 2 

1. Danville 4 

2. Somerset 3 

2. Woodford County 3 

4. Henry Clay 3 

B. Lafayette 1 

6. Jessamine County 

7. Madison 

REGION III 
District 1 

1. Highlands 7 

2. Boyd County 4 

3. Campbell County B 

4. Simon Kenton 6 

5. Covington Catholic 4 

6. Dixie Heights 3 

7. Paul Blazer 2 

8. Boone County 1 

8. Newport 1 

10. Holmes 

10. Russell 

12. Newport Catholic 2 

District 2 

1. Bryan Station 6 

2. Harrison County 3 

3. Tates Creek 4 

4. George Rogers Clark 3 

6. Franklin County 1 

6. Bourbon County 1 

7. Madison Central 

REGION IV 
District 1 

1. Evarts 4 

2. Middlesboro 4 

3. Knox Central 2 

4. James Cawood 2 

6. Cumberland 1 

6. Corbin 1 

7. •Bell County 1 

8. Whitley County 1 

•Defeated Whitley County 



2 





20.00 


2 





18.00 


3 





16.00 


4 





14.29 


3 





14.00 


5 





12.86 


6 





12.60 


3 





12.50 


5 





11.67 


fi 





10.00 


1 





N.R. 



L 


T 


Rating 





1 


21.26 


2 





19.00 


1 


1 


18.00 


1 


3 


17.00 


3 


1 


16.83 


3 





14.00 


4 





10.00 








26.00 


1 





21.25 


3 





17.14 


3 





16.00 


3 





15.00 


B 





12.86 


4 





12.00 


6 





11.43 


1 





21.25 


1 





21.25 


2 





19.17 


3 





18.33 


3 





14.00 


4 





13.33 


4 





10.00 


4 





10.00 


1 


1 


22.50 


1 





21.25 


1 





21.25 


2 





20.00 


2 


1 


15.00 


4 





10.00 


3 





N.R. 








25.00 








22.50 


1 





21.25 


1 





19.17 


3 





17.86 


3 





15.00 


3 





14.00 


5 





11.67 


6 





11.67 


8 





10.00 


4 





10.00 








N.R. 








26.00 


1 





18.75 


3 





17.86 


S 





16.00 


3 


1 


13.00 


4 





12.00 


4 


1 


11.00 








22.50 


1 


1 


19.58 





2 


19.38 


2 


1 


16.00 


2 


1 


13.75 


4 


1 


13.33 


3 





12.60 


3 





12.60 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1968 



Page Nine 



EVARTS— CLASS AA, REGION 4. DISTRICT I, CHAMPION 




(Left te RiEht) Front Row: Mgn. Oneill Andrews, Paul Hicks, WUIiam Smith, Larry Hicka. 
Second Row ; Coach Troatman, Charles Wallace, Jerry Logan, Ralph Clayton. Donnie Cloud, Lewis 
Mabes, Leroy Baker, William McCreary, Rex Estridge, Preston McLain, Kenny Kelly, George Madden, 
Gary Short, Coach Charles Hnnter. Third Row: Gary Thomas, Ewell King, S. Miracle, Frank 
Johnson, Freeman Saylor, D. Cloud, Charles F. Hunter, Willie Hicks, Willie M. Yount, Roderick 
Ramsey, Larry Short, Gary Parker. Fourth Row : Coach Mike Bradford, Terry Blevins, Jerry Blair, 
Jimmie Campbell, Ronnie Miller, Donnie McLain, Berry Coleman, Terry Campbell, James Packer, 
Vernon Wallace, Charles Cox, Butch Jackson, James Sanders. Fifth Row: Doug Williajns, Steve 
Andrews. Donnie Blaine. Dennis Saylor, William Troutman, Alfred Widner, Tommy McCreary, James 
Tally. Jerry Callett, Jerry Haynes, James Meeks. 



District 2 

1. Belfry * 

2. Prestonsburg 5 

5. M. C. Napier 2 

4. Hazard 1 

6. Whitesburg 

6. Leslie County 

CLASS AAA 

REGION I 

Team W 

1. Trinity 6 

2. Male 7 

5. Bishop David 4 

3. Flaget 6 

5. St. Xavier 5 

6. Shawnee 5 

7. Iroquois 3 

8. Manual 2 

9. Atherton 1 

10. DeSalee 1 

11. Central 

REGION II 
District 1 

1. Valley B 

2. Butler 3 

2. Pleasure Ridge Park 3 

4. Fairdale 2 

B. •Western 1 

6. Southern 1 

•Defeated Southern. 

District 2 

1. Seneca 7 

2. Thomaa Jefferson 4 

3. Eastern B 

4. Waggener 3 

B. •Fern Creek 3 

6. Westport S 

7. Jeffersontown 1 

8. Darrett 

•Defeated Westport 









22.B0 


1 





18.7B 


2 





16.00 


2 


1 


13.7B 


3 


1 


11.26 


B 





10.00 



L 


T 


Rating 


1 





26.26 


2 





24.00 


2 


1 


22.60 


2 


1 


22.60 


3 





21.00 


3 





19.38 


3 





16.00 


6 


2 


13.34 


4 


1 


12.60 


7 





11.26 


7 


1 


10.63 









26.00 


1 


1 


19.60 


1 


1 


19.60 


3 





16.00 


4 





12.00 


4 





12.00 








26.00 


2 





19.17 


2 





18.67 


4 





16.71 


4 
4 
4 
6 








14.29 
14.29 
12.00 
10.00 



The 1968 Cross Country 

The DeSales High School and Owensboro Hig^ School 
cross country teams won the staite Qass AAA and Class 
AA titles respectively in meets held at BeUarmine Col- 
lege, Louisville, on November 2. Ath. Dir. Eddie Weber 
of BeUarmine managed the two meets. 

Tim Harry of DeSales was individual champion in 
Qass AAA, Mike Haywood of Ashland in Oass AA. 

Team scores in Class AAA were as foUows: DeSales, 
26; Atherton, 86; Westport, 101; Pleasure Ridge Paric, 
190; Trinity. 192; Flaget, 208; Valley, 230; BuUer, 293. 

The order in which the first fifty runners finished Is 
given below, includii^ the times of the first twenty. 

l-TIm Harry, DeSales (9.59.9) ; 2-Glen Haley, "nwmas 
Jefferson (10.02.7); 3-Howie Hawkes, Westport (10.03); 
4-Joe Bishop, DeSales (10.14); 5-Ron Green, DeSales 
(10.19); 6-Ron Patrick, DeSales (10.25); 7-Kirk Mc- 
Creary, Atherton (10.27); 8-Willie White, Shawnee 
(10.31); 9-MJke Robinson, Flaget (10.32); 10-Al Metzler, 
DeSales (10.33); 11-Pete Mathews, Westport (10.34); 
12-Jack Sivori, DeSales (10.35) ; 13-Tom Strooey, DeSales 
(10.35); 14-Bruce Zoeller, Bishop David (10.36); 15-Ed- 
ward Bell, Atherton (10.37) ; 16-John Hammack, Durrett 
(10.38); 17-Rick Wrenn, Atherton (10.38); 18-Steve Lan- 
nert, St. Xavier (10.39); 19-Shad Casey, Eastern (10.40); 
20-Jerry Shuck, Pleasure Ridge Park (10.41); 21-Steve 
Collie, Westport; 22-L(Hiis Riley, Atherton; 23-Mike 
Reynolds, Iroquods; 24-Ted Macy, Waggener; 25-David 
Hardwick, Atherton; 26-Marty Minogue, Trinity; 27- 
TVree Welbum, Atherton; 28-Dennis Bickett, Valley; 
29-Jim Potts, Atherton; 30-Steve Jackson, Westport; 
31-Bryan Howell, Seneca; 32-Greg Howell, Waggener; 
33J)on Cain, Valley; 34-Ton Callahan, Trinity; 35-Danny 
Barfih, Trinity; 36-Bob Robinson, Westport; 37-Steve 
Walls, IroquQis; 38-Larry Bailey, Butler; 39-BiH Grilfes, 
Pleasure Ridge Park; 40-Gary Luttrell, Pleasure Ridge 
Park; 41-Steve Bond, Durrett; 42- Jeff Stewart, Wesitport; 
43-Terry McKieman, Flaget; 44-John Chapman, Bishop 
David; 45-Ron Dobhs, Pleasure Ridge Park; 46-Ghuck 
Danison, Pleasure Ridge Park; 47-Roger Breland, Val- 
ley; 48-Ed Sheeran, Trinity; 49-Dave Kempf, Trinity; 
50-Vaughcin Payne, Flaget. 

Team scares in Qass AA were as follows: Owens- 
boro, 109; Somerset, 134; Covington Catholic, 171; Lex- 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1968 



BELFRY— CLASS AA, REGION 4. CHAMPION 

i I 




(Left to Rigrht) Front Row: Mrg. Richard Preston. Roy Blackburn, James May. Serond Row: 
Scotty Moore, John Towles. Jerry Battistello. Ben Hubbard, Chaxles Hensley, Ikey McCoy, Stanley 
Tannyhill. James Cole, Randy Runyon, Nehemmie Woods, Roger Hatfield, Ass't Coarh Bernard 
Collier. Third Row: Head Coach Al Vipperman, Mike Smith, Roger May, Bill Bevins, Jim Locard, 
Lanny Murphy, Gary Williamson, Johnny King, Larry Durham, Gary Scott. Roy Bogar, Ass't Coach 
Tommy D. Runyon. Fo »rth Row: Jerry Brooks, Gerald Vamey, Alan Brooks, Harold Borders, Sam 
Stacy, Ray Lyons. Joe Sparks, Gary Hensley, Gary Layne, Randy Hackney. 

BRYAN STATION— CLASS AA, REGION 3, DISTRICT 2, CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Mgr. B. Pemberton, N. Howard. F. Young, W. HamiUon, R. 
Sloan, D. Elam, F. Wood, G. Williams, R. Stanton, A. Wallace. P. Douglas. B. Spry, B. Mooje, 
R. Thomas, R. Briscoe, K. Kirk, J. Davis. A. Greene, A. Nielsen, E. Blythe, M. Schneider. D. Shront. 
Second Row: Trainer D. Geddes. R. Greenlee, D. Courtney, M. Meehan, R. Croker, D. Ruth,. K. 
Chenault, B. Hiler, D. Elam, M. Sykes, D. Flynn, J. Self, D. Flynn, K. Coyle , M. Cooper, L. Dii , 
E. Keenan, R. Johnson, M. Campbell, K. Crum. N. Tye, M. Monthie, F. Corea. D. Robinson. R. 
Proctor, D. Magnider, Mgr. D. Rubin. Third Row: Trainer R. Myres, J. Homey, L. Lawson, N. 
Olsen, M. Curtis, D. Brashear, D. Goodwin, P. Byrne, G. Rice, D. Brown. L. Pryor. C. Sciantarelli , 
M. MoPadden, T. Mountford, K. Ray, A. Rice, W. Robinson, D. Boyd. M. Bates, M. Whalen , B. 
Simmerman, A. Sumner. R. Howard, G. Kitchen. Mgr. B. Hart. Fourth Row: M. Eversole. J. Wells. 
S. White. J. Wires, D. Wells. D. Trudell. L. McCormick, H. Sykes. R. Jacobs. J. Sebrins, D. Travis, 
P. Sallee. V. Covington. J. Dunn. D. Steele, W. Hardin, M. Dallak, F. LeMaster. T. Works^ 



ington Catholic, 182; Newport Catholic, 211; Lafayette, 
218; Ashland, 302; Taylor County, 359; Pa(iucah tilgh- 
man, 384; Louisville Country Day, 416; North Marsihall, 
420; Greensburg, 421; Meacie County, 432; Ellzabetlh- 
town, 437. 

The order in which the first fifty runners finished is 
given below, including the times of the first twenty. 

1-Mike Haywood, Ashland (10.01.3); 2-Gene Bondi, 
Newport Catholic (10.05); 3-Dale Nichols, Elizabethtown 
(10.09); 4-Buddy Harpool, East Hardin (10.09); 5Joe 
Bowsher, Lexington Catholic (10.11); 6-Steve Daffron, 
Monticello (10.11); 7-Paul Cox, Somerset (10.12); 8-Paul 
UptJhuroh, Montdello (10.16); 9-Jackie Rose, Greens- 
burg (10.24); 10-Ron Bolin, Owensboro (10.25); U-Dale 
Nanny, Murray (10.25) ; 12-John Porter, Owensboro 
(10.26); 13-Gary Whitfield, Covington Catholic (10.28); 
14-Paul Gregory, Covington Catholic (10.29); 15-Mark 
Summers, Lexington Catholic (10.29); 16-Pat Great- 
house, Lexington Catholic (10.30); 17-Bally Faith, Da- 
viess County (10.31); 18-George Penningtan, Somerset 



(10.33); 19-John Edwards, Somerset (10.33); 20-Jerry 
Young, Somerset (10.34); 21-David Hayden, Paducah 
Tilghman; 22-Mike Conkwright, Owensboro; 23-Wayne 
Bernhardt, Daviess County; 24-Roger Jones, Paducah 
Tilghman; 25-Max Hadley, Adair County; 26-Don Mun- 
ning'hoff, Newport Catholic; 27-(rurtis Davidson, Daviess 
County; 28-Wayne Sibley, Lafayette; 29-Marzell Under- 
wood, Lafayette; 30-Ronnie (Jleaner, Meade Ctounty; 
31-Steve Potts, Owensboro; 32-Harry Riddle, Ashland; 
33-Curtis Harris, Wayne Coimty; 34-Tony Maddox, Ow- 
ensboro; 35-Glenn Weingarth, Tates (3reek; 36-Manuel 
Nalley, East Hardin; 37-Jack Nienscher, Covington 
Catholic; 38-Ricky Hill, Bardstown; 39-Rick Johnson, 
Dixie Heights; 40-Giary Bigler, Lexington Catholic; 41- 
Jack Trawick, LouisviOe Country Day; 42-Lloyd Jones, 
Wayne County; 43-Phil Meyer, Lafayette; 44-Gene 
Sagaser, Tates Creek; 45-Mike Shields, St. Mary; 46- 
Charles Henderson, Frankfort; 47-Cash Centers, Wood- 
ford County; 48-Gregg Martin, Trigg Clounty; 49-Vem 
Azavedo, Lafayette; 50- Jerry Lea, Ctovington Catholic. 



TOE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1968 



Page Eleven 



SENECA— CLASS AAA. REGION 2 CHAMPION 




Wi^i^r^^"^-'dK1^,M*ȣ,i%>q 



(Left to> Riffht) Front Row: Andy Strickland, Wayne Randel, Jimmy Anderson, David Clemons, Gary 
Gish, Roffer Turner, Mike .Farah, Joe Wixson, John Petty, David Dix, David Heintz, Larry Bailey, Larry 
Eaves. Second Row: Dana Reinhardt, Henry Johnson, Bobby Jones, Ray Brown, Bobby Brown, iRandy Rein- 
hardt, ;Benny Singrleton, Danny Karem, Carey Eaves, Paul Smith. Glen Brucchieri. /Mike Standard, Jimmy 
Gardner, Finley Hayes, Dennis Sawyer. Third Row: Mike Christ, Marvin Leffew, Buddy Key, Tom Warren, 
Lee Andrews, Tim Cyrus, Bill Bauer, Don Russell, Niels Fogt, Fred Harwood, Jack .Rlley» Cedric Turner, 
Joe Bill Henry, Mack Stallard, Mack McKinney, Daryl Bishop. 

VALLEY— CLASS AAA, REGION 2, DISTRICT I, CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Bcatty. (^raybeal, Bruce, Bell. Warwick, Kinzel. Siunmers, Wells, 
Arnold, McGraw, Hicks, Linebaugh, Sells. Second Row: Mgr. Surrett. Beck. Grant, Powell, EIrod, 
Houffland, Davis, Barnett, Catlett, Dunn, Gardner, May, Duncan, Conn, Wyatt, Mgr. McCollough. 
Third Row: Trainer May, Wyatt. Goodin, Basham, Neeley, Catlett, Glass, Renger. Wilson, Barksdale, 
Sauer, Cook, Wiljanen, Pryor, Romagnoli, Boes. Walker, King. 



BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(Continued from Page Five) 

Lane, Robert Mark, Kiiwan Tower, Box 198, Lexington 
Lord. James F., 203 Fairfax Ave., Louisville. 896-8626 
Louden, Hubert C, 4815 Redstart Road, Louisville, 964-2639, 

584-4141 
Lucas, Gene T., 100 Lemons Mill Road, Georgetown, 863-2988, 

863-3505 
Lyons, Tommy L., P. O. Box 112, Beechmont. 476-8390, 

476-2204 
Lytle. William Price, 1506 Beacon Hill, Lexington, 254-9603, 

264-1111 
McBride, W. Kenneth, 157 St. William Drive. Lexington, 

266-7786, 265-6666 
McClure, William Scott. P. O. Box 343, London, 864-6940, 

Somerset 679-1601 
McEldred. Charles G., 212 Pocahontas Tr., Georgetown, 

863-0927. 265-3612 
McGinty, L. V., Jr., P. O. Box 226, Pikeville, 437-4720, 

432-1226 
McKenzie. Dwight E., 2341 Winchester Ave., Ashland, 325-7081, 

324-2136 
McVey, Joe E., Route 4, Mt. Sterling, 498-2318 
Maness, Charlie L, Frenchburg 

Marcum, Billy Ray, West Irvine. 723-3780, 623-2210, cxt. 246 
Martin. Harold E., 267 Louden Ave., Lexington, 254-0489, 

264-3816 
Mattingly, Bernard, 417 Happy Ridge Road, Brandenburg, 

422-3448 



May, Larry. 69 West 2nd St.. Williamson, W. Va. 

Mayes. Edward, 838 Crossbill Road, Danville, 236-3264, 

236-6131 
Mayfield, Clarkie. Country Club Estates, Franklin, 686-4663, 

686-3274 
Meadows, Marvin, Clayhole, 666-7775 (Bus.) 
Meredith, Denny E., Jr.. 5630 Indian Oak Circle, Louisville, 

968-1793. 367-6411, ext. 216 
Meyer. Raymond F., 110 Grand Ave., Latonia, 261-3272, 

341-9309 
Miles, Marvin, 129 Mill St., Henderson, VA 7-1692, VA 7-3693 
Miller, Eddie Nelson, 1000 Crest, Corbin, 528-6657. 528-4646 
Miller, William J., 203 Woodhill Lane, Frankfort, 223-5357, 

Lexington 254-6412 
Monks, Ronald E., 6714 Cindy Drive, Louisville, 937-6222 
Montgomery, Don, P. O. Box 11, Burgin. 748-5582, 748-5180 
Moore, Clarence K., 2200 Jasmine Drive, Lexington, 278-3172, 

254-5143 
Moore, Franklin. 902 Walnut St., Dayton 
Morgan, Charles A., Route 3. Clinton, 653-6973 
Morris, Larry G., Pell Street. Lewisport, 295-3573 
Mudd. Ed. 3612 Mildred, Louisville, 448-1609, 448-4620 
Mullins, Larry Ben. 390 High St., Jenkins, 832-2235 
Mullins, Lloyd G., Jr., Cornelia Avenue, Whitesburg, 633-5015, 

633-2221 
Neathery, James T.. Route 5, Madisonville, 821-8746, S69-4212 
Neuman. Douglas McGuire, 271 Kaimia. Lexington. 258-9000 
O'Connell, Jim, 108 Mound Ave., Milford, Ohio, 831-0744, 

831-1900 
Osborn, Philip C, 1401 Paul Ave., Louisville, 368-2058, 

368-2058 
Osbourn, Joseph A., 9814 Northridge Drive, Valley Station, 

936-1980 
Parker, Dale, Greenup, 836-5451 
Partin, Boiling Staunton. Jr., Kirwan Tower, Box 204, Lex- 

iDKton. 258-9000, ext. 39466 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY fflGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1968 



Season's 
Greetings 



*Z4e KUt(fde4t Qo-mfiaHif general agent 



W. E. KINGSLEY 



I2I-IIJ LAFAYEHE AVENUE 
P. O. BOX 7100 



J. E. McCREARY. Mgr. 

LHe Department 
LEXINGTON, KY. 40502 



CHARLES C. PRICE 



PHONE 254-4095 



Peck, Kenneth. 404 Caramel, Hopkinsville 

Powell, Billy Eogcr, P. O. Box 504, Elkhorn City, SK 4-8702 

Price, Terry Srott, Route 1, Mt. Olivet, 724-3225 

Primm, James T., Route 1, Hopkinsville 

Pursiful, Charles E., 317 Maple S.., Pineville, 

337-2392 
Pyle, John, 104 Wayside, Hopkinoville 
Ramsey, Ralph, Jr., Grays Knob, 573-1243. 673-5302 
Rheaume. Leroy T.. B-6-2 USATC. Fort Knox. 

624-2036 
Richardson, Robie, Route 2, Stephensburg, 862-4183 
Roark. Forrest Glen. 1404 Baleigh Road, Apt. 

299-5043, 299-1221, ext. 3201 
Robinson, Al, 2162 Sage Road, Lexington 277-7661, 
Robinson, D. Blake. Jay Street. Pikeville, 432-3269, 
Rogers, Eldridge, 310 Talbert, Hopkinsville, 886-5571, 
Romans, Jerry, 2137 East Lane, Louisville, 448-3233 
Rose, Scott, P. O. Box 125, Hazel Green, 662-4516, 
Rose. Wally, 623 S. Rodge Drive. Lexington. 299-6881 
Rothfuss, Richard. 37 Gregory Lane. Fort Thomas. 441-9190 

Rust. Naron Boyd. Route 2. Guthrie. 483-2375, 483-2355 
St. Clair, Robert L., Jr.. 4306 Leaf Drive. Louisville, 361-2493 
361-2493 

A., Cumberland Avenue, 
E.. 8803 Peterborough, 



337-5115, 



942-2680, 

862-3924 
10, Lexington, 

299-4381 
437-6286 
886-3921 

662-4615 



Gene, 100 E. Leesway Drive, L,exinKton, 



338-4179, 764-3211 
Park, Lexington, 



Mt. Sterling, 498-2683, 498-2250 
Piack Lane, Fort Wright, 331-4374, 

3435 Greentree Road, Lexington, 

2116 Chippewa Drive, Circleville, 



Barbourville, 
Louisville. 



646-4380 
426-6522, 



1122 Spendthrift Drive, Lexington, 266-0910, 
G., 2686 Windsor Ave., Owensboro, 683-0008, 



Scent, James 
Schlich. Paul 

896-0211 
Scott. Jerry. 

262-4923 
Settle. Roy 

683-6651 
Shackelford. Lonnie. P. O. Box 77, Salvisa, 865-4069, Lexing- 
ton 254-6412. ext. 289 
Sharp. Lloyd. 314 N. 25th St.. 
Smith, Benny L., Route 3, 

698-2461 
Smith. David W.. 702-D Warrendale 

863-0534. 863-0534 
Smith. (Miss) Virginia Lee. Route 2, Baxter, 637-2488 
Snodgrass, Jack D., 272 Foote, Bellevue, 291-0659 
Speaks, Billy Conway, Route 6. Box 195. Somerset. 274-3342 
Stanley. James H., 105 Cherry St.. Pineville, 337-2900. 

337-2348 
SUten, Gordon Lee, Jr., Route 2, Falmouth. 664-8660, €54-3977 



Middlesboro, 248-6847, 
Box 5, Manchester, 



248-1000 
698-2461, 



Court, Georgetown, 



Stephens, Robert 

254-4793 
Stovall, Terry. P. O. Box 42. Graham, 
Strieble, Ronnie David, 148 Penmoken 

277-0683, 265-2865 

Tate, Harold Dean, Route 1, Box 116-A, Ashland, 928-9460, 

324-3840 
Taylor, Clayton, Route 4, 
Taylor, Robert L., 2006 

366-6220 
Thompson, Thomas A., 

266-8921, 664-4796 
Thompson, William D.. 
Ohio 

Towler, Jimmy, Route 1, Cadiz 

Toy, Charles K., 277 Richmond Ave., Mt. Sterling 
Trimble. James, Frenchburg, 768-3741 

Turner, Tommy, P. O. Box 12. Versailles, 873-6510, 223-2096 
Varble. William E., 3108 Widgeon Ave., Louisville 
Vaughan, Ronald G.. Freeburn, 466-3464 
Vest, Jewell, 667 Emerson, Lexington, 254-2026 
Vest, Thomas, Ezel. 725-5286 

Wallin, Charles. Jr.. 668 Northside, Lexington, 299-8639 
Webb, Albert Nevell, 244 Wayne St.. Manchester, 698-2746 
Webb, Lonard H., Bonnieville, 531-1111 (Bus.) 
Weidner. Paul R.. 6432 Louese Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

662-1300, 921-3744 
Weihe, Robert J., 1840 Yale. Louisville. 469-6397, 775-4661, 

ext. 67 
Welch, Ronald J., Guant Sub., 
West. John, Cottonwood Drive, 

236-2521 
Wheeler, Resvie, P. O. Box 173, West Liberty, 

743-3706 
Wilford, James Columbus, 201 

886-4173, 886-3921 
Williams. Jack A.. 1539 MacArthur Drive, Evansville, Ind., 

476-8876. 424-4201 
Wiseman. David E., 2110 W. Gaulbert. Louisville, 778-1628, 

448-6351 
Wright, John David, 442 McLean Ave., Hopkinsville 
Wyatt, Ronald Lee. Central Hall, W.K.U., Bowling Green, 

746-2674. 745-2191 
Youne. James R., P. O. Box 686, Elkton, 266-2066 



Carrollton, 732-6790 

Route 4, Hickman, 236-3296. 

622-4496, 

Massey Lane, Hopkinsville, 




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HiqhkhoolAniMe 



CLASS A STATE CHAMPION LYNCH 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Tom Johnson, Roger Wilhoit, James Vicini, David Hollings- 
worth, Bobby Joe Golden, Mike Kirby, Joe Washington, Maceo Peeples, Terry Rodgers, Ron- 
nie Hampton, Ass't Coach Richard Smithson. Second Row: Ass't Coach Enoch Foutch, Ass't 
Coach Ray Jenkins, Ass't Coach John Staley, Danny Powell, Randy Adams, Millard Caldwell, 
Dennis Clark, Alan Wagers, David Sizemore, Mike Price, Charles Russell, Kenny Vicini, 
Thomas Roscoe, Darryl Washington, Gary Dye, Ass't Coach John Morgan, Coach Ed Miracle, 
Third Row: John Reasor, Roger Gibbons, Curtis Stewart, Ezell Smith, Mark Moran, Joe 
Gibson, Dwain Morrow, Ralph Price, Henry Rodgers, Tom Sheback, Jesse Mackey, Darryl 
Atkinson, Johnny Owens, Marc Merritt, Gary Standridge. 



Lynch 14-Old Ky. Home 
Lynch 25-Middlesboro 14 
Lynch 49-London 6 
Lynch 48-Cumberland 6 
Lynch 52-Cawood 



Lynch 19-Evarts 31 
Lynch 12-Harlan 12 
Lynch 63-Prkeville 13 
Lynch 66-Fleming Neon 



PLAYOFFS 

Lynch 2B-McKell 13 
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Lynch 14-Frankfort 6 



Official Organ of the 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

January, 1969 



Conference Standings 

Big Eight Conference 

Owensboro 6 

Madisonville 5 10 

Daviess County 3 3 

Henderson 3 3 

Owensboro Catholic 3 3 

Henderson County 15 

Union County 6 

Blue Grass Conference 

Sayre 4 

Berea 2 

Mercer County 2 2 

Louisville Country Etay 110 

Kentucky School Deaf 111 

Burgin 2 3 1 

Mt. Vernon 5 



Central Kentucky Conference 



Frankfort 

Danville 

Anderson 

Somerset 

Mt. Sterling 

Stanford 

WoodfoixlCounty 

Henry Clay 

Madison 

Garrard County 

Harrodsburg 

Georgetown 

Jessamine County 

Paris 

M. M. I. 

Shelbyv'ille 



24.50 
24.00 
22.00 
20.00 
19.29 
18.75 
18.33 
16.00 
13.75 
11.67 
11.67 
11.43 
11.25 
N.R. 
N.R. 
N.R. 



Cumberland Valley Conference 



Evaiits 

Lynch 

James A. Cawood 

Cumberland 



Eastern Kentucky Mountain Conference 



Jenkins 

Belfry 

Elkhorn City 

M. C. Napier 

Johns Creek 

Whitesburg 

Fleming-Neon 

Hazard 

Pikeville 

Wheelwright 



Mid-Kentucky Conference 

Bardstown 4 

Old Kentucky Home 2 1 

(Lebanon 2 1 

Washington County 1 3 

Shepherdsville 4 

Mid State Conference 

Bryan Station 6 

Scott County 2 D 

Harrison County 4 1 

George Rogers Clark 4 2 

Madison Central 1 3 

Bourbon County 1 4 

Franklin County 1 4 

Montgmoery County 5 






25.00 


1 


19.40 


1 


19.40 





12.50 





10.00 



North Central Kentucky Conference 

E)minencs 3 

CairoU County 2 10 

Henry County 12 

Owen County 3 

Northeastern Kentucky Conference 



Boyd County 


4 








25.00 


McKell 


4 


1 





21.00 


Russell 


3 


2 


1 


19.17 


Louisa 


3 


L 





18.75 


Raceland 


2 


3 


1 


15.00 


Wurtland 


1 


4 





12.00 


Catlettsburg 





G 





10.00 


Northern Kentucky 


Athlet 


ic 


Conference 


Highlands 


7 








24.00 


Campbell County 


7 


1 


1 


23.40 


Dayton 


5 


L 


2 


22 00 


Lloyd 


6 


2 





20.00 


Simon Kenton 


6 


9 


1 


19^7 


Di.xie Heights 


5 


5 





16.00 


Beechwood 


2 


2 





15.00 


Newport 


3 


5 





14,75 


Boone County 


9 


5 





12, S6 


Ludlow 


1 


6 





11,44 


Bellevue 





r, 





1000 


Holmes 





9 





10.00 



South Kentucky Conference 

Russcllville '2 1 

FrankUn-Sim.pson 2 10 

Bowling Green 12 

Glasgow 12 

Southern Kentucky Athletic Conference 



Glasgow 

TompkLnsville 

CampbellsviUe 

Caverna 

iMctcalfe County 

Greensburg 



Southeastern Kentucky Conference 



Harlan 
Kno.x Central 
Mlddlesboro 
Pineville 
Williamsburg 
London 
Lynn Camp 
Bell County 
Corbin 
Hazel Green 
Whitlty County 



30.0 
20.S 
20.8 
19.4 
18.5 
17.1 
17.1 
16.9 
16.0 
14.2 
12.1 



Western Kentucky Athletic Conference 



Paducah Tilghman 
Mayfield 

Franklin-Simpson 
Hopkinsville 
Caldwell County 
Bo>vling G'-een 
Cliristian County 

Fidton 
Murray 
Russellville 
Trigg County 
North IMarshall 
Fort Campbell 
Crittenden County 
Warren Central 



AA Division 

3 
3 
3 
1 





A Division 

5 
4 
4 
3 
2 
1 





23.12 
21.00 
18.50 
18.00 
16.67 
14.00 
10.00 

26.00 
23.00 
21.25 
19.17 
18.50 
11.66 
10.00 
N.R. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXXI— NO. 6 



JANUARY, 1969 



Jl.OO Per Year 



Early Season Basketball Questions 



Editor's Note: These interpretations of the rules of 
the National Basketball Comtnittee of the United States 
and Canada do not set aside nor modify any rule. The 
rulings are made by the National Federation of State 
High School Athletic Associations in response to situa- 
tions presented. 

Clifford B. Fagan, Committee Secretary 

1. Play: Are nets of metal chain links legal? 
Ruling: No. The basket net shall be of white cord, 

12-(mesh net between 15 and 18 inches in length. 'Kie 
cord of the net shall not be less than 12CMiiread or more 
than 144-thread seine twine. Cotton is the material most 
frequently used atlihougih nets of nylon twine which 
otberwise qualify are legal. Nets shall be so constructed 
as to check the ball momentarily as it passes through 
tihe basket. 

2. Play: The home team provides a molded type 
hall whdch has a camposition cover. 

Ruling. For high school and YMCA games sudh 
balls which have been tested and approved as having the 
proper reaction have the same status as an official 
leattier covered ball. A list of balls wJiich meet the 
proper standards may be secured from the National 
Federation office or from any state high school associa- 
tion office. The manufacturerers usually designate such 
balls as have been approved and sanotdoned. For college 
games, bails having a rubber or camposition cover have 
the same status as leather covered bedls provided both 
teams agree to use such a ball or conferences authorize 
the use of such balls. 

3. Play: During a throw-in the ball is allowed to lie 
on the floor in the back court with no player attempting 
to touch it. 

Ruing: The ball continues to be dead. It is not in 
control of either team. Hence, the 10-second count is 
not started. However, the 5-second count permitted for 
a throw^n will expire if the hall is not touched and 
result in ithe ball being awarded to B out of bounds at 
the spot of the previous throw-in. 

4. Play: Can loss of control occur in the mdddle of 
a dribble? 

Ruling: No. Loss of player control ends a dribble. 
Consequently, after the player regains control subse- 
quent dribble action is a new dribble (illegal) and not 
a part of the original dribble. 

5. Play: If a foul is flagrant, is the offending player 
always disqualified and an additional free throw 
awarded? 

Ruling: The player is always disqualified. The 
extra free throw is always awarded provided such a 
foul is not ipart of a double or multiple foul, or which 
otherwise carries a penalty of two free throws. 

6. Play: Players take position around the restrain- 
ing circle in preparation for a jump ball. After the 
official is ready to make the toss, B5 requests permis- 
sion to take a position between Al and A2, who are 
adjacent to each other on the restraining drole. 

Ruling: The request as denied. The purpose of the 
rule is to expedite play and to prevent a continuous 



jockeying for position. An opponent is entitled to an 
alternate position around the circle only if he indicates 
his desire before the official is ready to toss the ball. 
After the offici2d is ready to toss the ball, he will ignore 
any such request. 

7. Play: Al has the ball in his back court near the 
division line, (a) He throws the ball against an official 
in the front court so that it rebounds to the back court; 
or (b) he throws the ball into the front court with re- 
verse EingU^ so that it roUs into the back court. In 
either case, the ball is first touched by A2. 

Ruling: Team A was in control at the time the ball 
was last touched by a player of A before it went from 
the front court to the back court. Therefore, it is a 
violation for Ulegal touching when A2 touches it in the 
back court. 

e. Play: A fihrow^in by Al is touched in the front 
court by A2. A2 is unable to secure control of the b£iil 
and it comes to rest on the floor within the back court. 
No player attempts to secure control and the ball lies 
on the floor. 

Ruhng: After a reasonable time, the referee will 
blow the ball dead and, as provided in Rule 6, Section 
3, Item (e), the ball will be put in play by a jump ball 
at the center of the restraining circle which is nearest 
to the spot where the ball was blown dead. 

9. Play: Al throws the ball down into the basket 
from above but from outside the imaginary cylinder. 
His hand loses contract with the ball before it (the ball) 
enters the cylinder. However, on the fallow-through his 
hand enters the cylinder. 

Ruling: Legal. It is not a violation fbir a player to 
have his hand within the imaginary cylinder above the 
basket provided it is not touching the ball. The current 
coverage makes it mandatory for the player to throw 
or tap the ball into the basket. 

10. Play: Al, near his basket, legally caitohes the 
b£ill outside the imaginary cylinder above the ring. 
With his hand or hands continujously in contact with the 
ball, he pushes it down through the ring without touch- 
ing the ring or net during the action. 

Ruling: Violation. Basket interference. The clock is 
stopped. The ball is awarded to team B for a throw-in 
opposite the free throw line extended. 

U. Play: Al is in his front court holding the ball 
near the division line at the center circle and is closely 
guarded by Bl and B2. At the count of 3 seconds, A2 
cuts near Al. The cut of A2 is behind Al and in his back 
court. Al makes a legitimMe attempt to pass to A2. 

Ruling: The held ball count is terminated. The pro- 
visions of 4-13 (b) do not state that the cutter must be 
in his mid-court. However, it would be a violation for 
Al to return the ball to a teammaite in the back court. 

12. Play: Al and A2 are in their back court. Al 
leaps from the floor and receives a pass from A2. Al 
alights simultaneously on both feet, one of which is 
placed in his front court and the other in the back court. 
He straddles the division Mne. Al hits the foot in the 

((Continued on Page Seventeen) 



Paare Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCJIOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1969 



JANUARY, 1969 



VOL. XXXI— NO. 6 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

Hi^h School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 40501 

Second class postage paid at Lexington. Kentucky. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 

BOARD OF CONTROL 

President P-eston Holland (1965-69). Murray 

Vice-President Ralph ■ Dorsey (1966-70). Horse Cave 

Directors — W. H. Crowdus (1968-71). Franklin; Morton Combs 
(1968-72), Carr Creek: Don Davis (1967-71), Independence; 
James T. Dotson (196*-72). Johns Creek; Don R. Rawlings 
(1965-69). Danville; Foster J. Sanders (1966-70), Louisville. 
Subscription Rate $1.00 per Year 



jtiom the Commissionei s CJfft 



ice 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1968 Football Participation List 

2. School's Report on Football Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Football) 



Approved and Certified Officials 

A large number of K.H.S.A.A. registered officials 
(jualified for the advanced rating of Approved and Cer- 
tified as a result of the National Federation basketball 
examination wliich was given in Kentucl<y on Decem- 
ber 2, 1968. The Approved rating does not carry forward 
from year to year, but must be earned each year. After 
an official has received the Certified fating, he keeps 
this rating provided that he attends the clinic for the 
current year and worked in at least twelve first team 
high school basketball games during the previous year. 
Only officials receiving 'these higher ratings are eligidle 
to work in the regional tournaments. Only Certified 
offi(nals are eligible to work in the State Tournament. 

Basketball officials who qualified for advanced rat- 
ings during the current season are as follows: 
CERTIFIED OFFICIALS 



Alexiander, Rex 
Allen, Nelson R. 
Anders, Raleigh 
Bell, Clarence T. 
Blevins, Boone 
Brashear, Loy Ray 
Brizendine, Vic 
Brock, John H. 
Brown, BiUy C. 
Brown, E. C. 
Brown, John W. "Scoop" 
Browning, Earl E. 
Bruner, Jack C. 
Buis, Nathaniel A. 
Burke, Harry R. 
Butcher, Douglas 
Butcher, Granville "Bo" 
Butier, Robert D. 
Bubier, Billy M. 
Carlberg, John H. 
Cisco, Robert N. 
Clemmons, Sam 
CoUins, Hubert 
Combs, Keith A. 
Conley, Ted L. 
Cooksey, Marvin 
Cox, Alva J. 
Croft, Lewis E. 
Dame, L. J. 



Daniel, Roger T. 
Davis, Harold T. 
Davis, Ralph E. 
DeVary, Bill 
Disken, James W. 
Dobson, Kenneth 
Dorsey, James 
Dotson, John B. 
Drake, Richard R. 
DriskeU, Earl, Jr. 
Duerson, Wm. R. 
Duff, Earl 
Durbin, Hade, Jr. 
Duvall, Thomas J., Sr. 
Eades, James M. 
ElUott, Carroll L. 
Finley, Albert 
Flynn, Bobby 
Foster, Bob 
Fraley, Bill J. 
Freese, Oliver T. 
Fritz, Sherman 
Fuller, Jdhn R., Jr. 
Getiler, John F. 
Gilbert, Gerald L. 
Golden, Billy Joe 
Goley, James E. 
Gootiman, Jacdi 
Gout, Bob 



Gustafson, Al, Jr. 


Perry, James E. 


Hammock, Don L. 


Phelps, Ralph "Rudy" 


Hammons, Norman 


Points, Charles 


Harned, Victor C. 


Reed, Charles R. 


Harper, Robie 


Reed, Gordon 


Harris, BUly 


Rees, Gayle H. 


Hewitt, R. T. 


Reinhardt, Myron 


Hill, Earl F. 


Rexroat, Jerry L. 


Hinton, Henry E., Jr. 


Rickett;s, C. 0. 


Hofstetter, Joe 


Ring, WiUiam H. 


Holt, Robert E. 


Rister, Edgar L. 


Holtihouser, Ora L. 


Ritter, Goebel 


Horeman, Bill 


Rogers, Howard 


Hubbs, Oetus L., Jr. 


RoUer, Otis 


Hunley, Neil P. 


Runyon, Tommy Dean 


Huter, Jim 


RusseU, Allen W. 


Irwin, Charles R. 


St. Clair, Robert L., Jl 


Johnson, James M. 


Salyer, Henry E. 


Johnson, Ronald L. 


Schlich, Paul E. 


Jahnson, Wm. Bernard 


Shuck, Thomas G. 


Johnson, Walter 


Selvy, Curt 


ICeUy, Charles R. 


ghaw. Earl 


Kimmel, Jerry 


Simpson, Fred C. 


King, Jim 


Singleton, Bobby L. 


Knight, Bm 


Small, Bill 


Kuhl. Lawrence 


Smith, Wayne N. 


Laubheimer, Donald T. 


Smith, Willord N. 


Lawson, RondeU 


Smitii, William E. 


Ule, Qyde F. 


Smith, Wyatt Jack 


Long, Bill 


Speck, Michael E. 


Louden, Hubert 


Spencer, Irvin E. 


Loudy, Kenneth 


Steenken, William R. 


Lowe, Gene T. 


Stephenson, Harry S. 


Lucas, Gene 


Stiff, Maurice 


Lusby, George H. 


Stikeleather, Clyde L. 


Lytle, Wm. Price 


Strain, Richard 


McCargo, Frank 


Strong, Amett 


McClure, W. S. 


Sullivan, Don C. 


McCoy, Hayse 


Sumner, Carl 


McGehee, G. K. 


Taylor, Ed 


McLane, Albert I. 


Thompson, Jack 


Maines, George 


Tinsley, Marion R. 


May, E. B., Jr. 


Triplett, Herbert W. 


Meade, Foster "Sid" 


Van Zant, Jim 


Meredith, Denny 


Varble, WUliam 


Metzger, Don 


Vescovi, Raymond B. 


Meyer, Bud 


Vettiner, Charlie 


Mnier, Bob 


Weaver, Ray 


Miller, Ferrel 


Weiner, Dick 


IVIiller, Rex J. 


Wesdhe, James A. 


Mooneyhan, James 


White, David B. 


Moore, Robert 


Williams, Roger 


Morse, Richard K. 


Winchester, Roy L. 


Moser, Rudy C. 


Winfrey, Shelby 


Mudd, Ed 


Wirtz, Howard 


Norwood, Thomas 


Wise, BiUy V. 


Dmer, Harold G. 


Wise, Jack 


O'Nan, Norman 


Woods, Gene 


Padgett, R. K. 


Woprice, Ron 


Peay, Curtis 


Wright, James L. 


Peeno, Harry R. 




APPROVED OFFICIALS 


Bates, Bob 


Cloud, Ralph L. 


Blackwood, Thomas W. 


Cravens, Robert L. 


Bleidt, John J. 


Durbin, Roy 


Brock, Alben W. 


Farley, Jimmy 


Bmah, BiUy 


Feix, Al 


Byron, Louis S. 


Gaither, Gene 


CoUier, Burnard 


Gibson, Fred W. 


Caldwell, James 


Graiham, James 


Cash, Charles C. 


Hall, William C. 


(Continued 


on Page Fifteen) 



THE KENTUCKY fflGH SCHOOL ATHLEl^E FOR JANUARY, 1969 



I^e Tbree 



1968-69 MEMBERSHIP IN THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOQATION 



Sdwol 


AddtMS 


T«l. No. Principal 
REGION 1 


Coach 


D. 1 Carlisle County 


Bardwell 


628-5411 


Burley Maitfais 


Bobby Hoskins 


Fulton 


Fulton 


472.1741 


Bobby Snider 


Bill Robertson 


Fulton County 


R. 4, Hickman 


23S.3168 


Bobby Oiilders 


Dale Alexander 


Hickman County 


Clinton 


653-5461 


James H. Phillips 


James Vodght 


D. 2 Ballard Memorial 


R. 1, Barlow 


665-5131 


Bob Buchanan 


Dale Ray 


Heath 


Paducah 


488-3126 


Larry Powell 


Frank Wright 


Lone Oak 


Paducah 


554-1821 


Glenn E. Dexter 


Jack McKinney 


Paducah Tilghman 


Paducah 


443-6296 


Bradford D. Mutchler 


Ramey Miller 


Reidland 


Paducah 


898-2441 


Ben Sydboten 


Don Rudolph 


St. Mary 


Paducah 


442-1681 


Bro. Ignatius Brown 


Dennis Gourley 


D.3 Cuba 


R. 1, Mayfield 


382-3400 


W. W. Chumbler 


Edward L. Ford 


Fancy Farm 


Fancy Farm 


623-1349 


Jimmy Wiggins 


Dennis PUcher 


Farmington 


Farmii^on 


345-2171 


James A. Baker 


Joe Mikez 


Lowes 


Lowes 


674-5a33 


Charles Hamlin 


Scott Schlosser 


Mayfield 


Mayfield 


247-4461 


Barkley Jones 


Don Sparks 


Sedalia 


Sedalia 


328-8256 


James A. Hckard 


Ken Wray 


Symsonla 


Symsonia 


851-3231 


Cecil Reid 


I>onald Butler 


Wingo 


Wingo 


376-2236 


C. W. Jones 


Rill Owen 


D. 4 Benton 


Benton 


527-9091 


A. N. Duke, Jr. 


Joe Wiirren 


Calloway County 


Murray 


753-5479 


Howard R. Crittenden 


Roy Cothran 


Murray 


Murray 


753-5202 


Eli Alexander 


Bobby Toon 


Murray University 


Murray 


762-3824 


Vernon E. aown 


Terry Shelton 


North Marshall 


Calvert Qty 


395-4400 


Barney "Hiweatt 


Don Breeden 


South Marshall 


R. 1, Benton 


527.2891 


William A. Cothran 


Charley Lampley 






REGION 2 




D. 5 Caldwell County 


Princeton 


365-2635 


Joseph W. aark 


Harold C. Jones 


Crittenden County 


Marion 


9654226 


R. G. Fiser 


George Whitecottoo 


Fredonia 


Fredonia 


54&-3431 


Riley Demi^on 


Bob Hooks 


Livingston Central 


Buma 


98»^263 


K. T. Hardin 


Don Ringstaff 


Lyon County 


Eddyville 


388-2296 


Lage Shadowen 


James Ringstalf 


Trigg County 


Cadiz 


522-6653 


Arnold S. Oaken 


James Wallace 


0. C Henderson 


Henderson 


826-9568 


W. B. Posey 


Ben Finley 


Henderson County 


Henderson 


826-9056 


Donald Chapman 


James E. Guess 


Holy Name 


Henderson 


826-6031 


J. F. Powers 


John Werner 


Providence 


Providence 


667-2411 


T. Wendell Johnson 


Philip Back 


Union County 


R. 4, Morganfield 


389-1454 


Riohard Vincent 


Steve Cumingham 


Webster County 


Dixon 


639-2661 


Ivan L. Russell 


Bob Bradley 


D. 7 F^rlington 


Earlington 


383-SU 


Lester Mimms 


David Jenkins 


Maddsonville- 


Madisonville 


821-8503 


Floyd Brown 


Don Parson 


Nortih Hopkins 










South Hopkins 


NortonviUe 


676-3443 


David Siria 


James Beshejirs 


West Hopkins 


R. 1, Nebo 


249-3151 


A. O. Richards 


G£iry Morgan 


D.I Christian County 


Hopkinsville 


6864463 


Neal R. Tucker 


Harlan Peden 


Davson Springs 


Dawson Springs 


797-3811 


Paul Stevens 


Jim Bearden 


Fort Campbell 


Fort CampbeU 


798-2645 


Bill R. Perry 


Tom Head 


Hopkinsville 


Hopkinsville 


886-3384 


aetus Hubbs 


Boy Woolum 


Todd Central 


Eikton 


265.2506 


Robert N. Bu.* 


John Camp 






REGION 3 




D. f Calhoun 


Calhoun 


273-3264 


L. D. Knight 


W. 0. Warren 


Daviess County 


Owensboro 


684-5285 


W. P. Wheeler 


Randy Embry 


Livermore 


Livermore 


278-2522 


Robert E. Hanco(* 


Jesse T. Flynn 


Owensboro 


Owensboro 


684-7221 


Joe 0. Brown 


Robert Watson 


Owensboro Catholic 


Owensboro 


684-3215 


Henry O'Bryjm 


Mike Grebs 


Sacramento 


Sacramento 


736-2343 


Roy D. Withrow 


Steve Hays 


Trinity 


WhitesvUle 


233-5533 


Sr. Regina Boone 


Bryce Roberts 


D. IS Bremen 


Bremen 


525-3411 


Paul Phillips 


Randy Swan 


Centra] aty 


Central City 


754-2272 


Delmas Giah 


Jackie Day 


Drakesboro 


Drakesboro 


476-8411 


W. J. WUcutt 


Robie Harper 


Graham 


Grahctm 


338-1317 


L. A. Wells 


Joe "Iliamas 


Greenville 


Greenville 


3384650 


J. Ernest Atkins 


Jerry Shanks 


Hughes-Kirk 


Beechmont 


476-2204 


Charles Eades 


Eugene Pardue 


Muhlenberg Central 


Powderly 


338-3JJ50 


Lyle C. Baugh 


Winfred Thompson 



I 



Page Four 


1 


"HE KENTU 


CKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1969 


School 


Address 


Tel. No. Principal 


Coach 


D.ll Breckinridge County 


Hamed 


756-2149 


J. A. Blanton 


Tom Davis 


Fordsville 


Fordsville 


276-3601 


Noble H. Midkiff 


Don Coopage 


Frederick Fraize 


Qoverport 


788-3388 


Richaid 0. Bernard 


Edward Belcher 


Hancock County 


Lewisport 


927-6712 


nifton Banks, Jr. 


Denzel Mefford 


Ohio County 


Hartford 


274-3366 


Shelby C. Forsythe 


Ralph UnderhiU 


St. Romuald 


Hardinsburg 


756-5504 


Sr. Helen Marie 


Scott Willoughby 


D. 12 Butler County 


Morgantown 


526-3753 


DarreU C. Hampton 


Ray Burden 


CaneyviUe 


Caneyville 


879-4211 


Ramon Majors 


BUI Lee 


Clarkson 


Clarkson 


242-3061 


T. E. Cunningham 


Bowman Davenport 


Edmonson County 


Brownsville 


597-2932 


John M. Lane 


BiUy Qemmons 


Leit(Thfield 


Leitohfield 


2594175 


John H. Taylor 


CecU Goff 






REGION 4 




D.IJ Adairville 


Adairville 


539-7711 


Jesse L. Richards 


Gerald Sinclair 


Auburn 


Auburn 


5424181 


Tom Garrett 


Howard Gorrell 


Chandler's Chapel 


Auburn 


542-4139 


Morris Shelton 


Ivan G. Pogue 


Lewisburg 


Lewisburg 


755^91 


BiU McKinney 


Robert Birdwhistell 


Olmstead 


Olmstead 


7344621 


R. E. Price 


James Milam 


Russell ville 


Russell ville 


726*134 


Roy D. Reynolds 


Dennis Doyle 


D. H Bowling Green 


Bowling Green 


842-1674 


Chester C. Redmon 


Larry Doughty 


Bristow 


BowUng Green 


842-1960 


Kenneth Harvey 


Joe Mac HUl 


Franklin-Simpson 


Franklin 


586-3273 


Don Stephenson 


John Price 


North Warren 


Smiths Grove 


563-2041 


Aaron Turner 


Ralph Baker 


Richards ville 


RichardsviUe 


777-3232 


E. J. Decker, Jr. 


DaUas Embry 


University 


Bowling Green 


745-3852 


James A. Carpenter 


R. Douglas Smith 


Warren Central 


Bowling Green 


842-0203 


Henry Resoh 


LoweU Hammers 


D. 15 Allen County 


Scottsville 


237-3841 


Ramond Barber 


Tommy Long 


Austin-Tracy 


Lucas 


434-2611 


K. B. SidweU 


Jim Manion 


Glasgow 


Glasgow 


651-8801 


Earl Bradford 


Tommy Downing 


Hiseville 


Hiseville 


453-2611 


James C. Coomer 


Bob Sturgeon 


Park aty 


Park aty 


749-2665 


Lorenza D. Davis 


DarreU Florence 


Scottsville 


Scottsville 


237-3751 


Bruce Stewart 


Lyle Dunbar 


Temple Hill 


Glasgow 


427-2611 


Zeb Ricketts 


Jim Lindsey 


D. 16 Clinton County 


Albany 


387-2891 


Perry C. Hay 


Lindle Castle 


Cumberland County 


Burkesville 


864-3451 


Edwin R. Hopper 


Larry McDonald 


Gamaliel 


Gamaliel 


157-2341 


Edwin Steen 


Jerome D. Taylor 


Metcalfe County 


Edmonton 


432-2481 


Howard B. Keel 


Gary Richardson 


Tompldnsville 


Tompkins ville 


487-6217 


Randall Grider 


Prentice Stanford 






REGION 5 




D. 17 East Hardin 


Glendale 


854-2300 


Don Cothran 


Don Morris 


Elizabethtown 


Elizabethtown 


765-5237 


Paul E. Kerrick 


Charles RawUngs 


Elizabethtown Catholic 


Elizabethtown 


769-1019 


James H. Brown 


Jerry L. Parker 


Flaherty 


Vine Grove 


828-2447 


Donald Hawkins 


Ronald Fentress 


Fort Knox 


Fort Knox 


624-7019 


Bob Burrow 


Walter Grabruck 


Meade County 


Brandenburg 


422-3214 


David T. Wilson 


Jim I-ambert 


North Hardin 


Vine Grove 


877-2210 


Ray Story 


Bennie Keen 


West Hardin 


Stephensburg 


892-3924 


Kenneth Riddle 


BiU Jones 


D. 11 Cavema 


Horse Cave 


773-7951 


Tom Hunt 


J. M. Taylor 


Cub Run 


Cub Run 


524-2925 


Wandel D. Strange 


Frank Cook 


Hart Memorial 


HardyviDe 


528-2271 


R. Brooks Bates 


Pat Jenkins 


lARue County 


Hodgenville 


358-3195 


Robert E. Brown 


Larry Purciful 


Hart County 


MunfordviUe 


524-9341 


Reath^l Goff 


Ken Metcalf 


D. 19 Bardstown 


Bardstown 


348-5913 


John H. Branson 


Garnis Martin 


Bloomfield 


Bloomfield 


252-2311 


J. B. Sparks 


Ernest Ruby 


Old Kentucky Home 


Bardstown 


348-8473 


T. G. Florence 


Joe Halcomb 


St. Catherine 


New Haven 


549-3194 


Sr. Jamesinii Spain 


James Schurlranz 


Washington County 


Springfield 


336-3718 


Robert L. Robertson 


R. Michael Marks 


D. 26 Adair County 


Columbia 


384-2751 


Brooks Coomer 


G corse Critz 


Campbells vUle 


CampbeUsville 


465-8774 


Richard L. Bower 


Don Shaw 


Greensburg 


Greensburg 


932-5231 


E. E. Tate 


Carl Deaton 


Lebanon 


Lebanon 


692-3441 


C. C. Banister 


Pat Tully 


St. Augustine 


Lebanon 


692-2063 


Sr. Mary Ely 


Edward Yarbough 


St. Charles 


R. 2, Lebanon 


6924578 


Sr. Mary Carl 


Edward L. Anderson 


Taylor County 


CampbeUsville 


4654431 


E. L. Cox . 


BUly B. Smith 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1969 


Page Five 


School 


Addran 


Tel. No. 


Principal 


Coach 








REGION 6 




D. 


21 Bishop David 


Louisville 


447-3442 


Bro. Richard Reaimie 


Leo Tiemey 




Butler 


Louisville 


448-4620 


H. L. Hatfield 


Lonnie WUloughly 




Doss 


Louisville 


363-4022 


J. S. Pittenger 


John Hosbaoh 




Loretto 


LouisvOle 


778-2122 


Sr. Ann Francis 


Jean Daugherty 




Pleasure Ridge Park 


Pleasure Ridge Park 935-5464 


Bobby Green 


Gary Schaffer 




Valley 


Valley Station 


937-2300 


J. C. CantreU 


Bobby Pace 




Western 


Louisville 


447-3221 


Jo(hn D. Brown 


Leonard C. Brown 


D. 


22 Ahrens Trade 


Louisville 


583-9711 


L. A. Burdon 


J. E. Smith 




Central 


Louisville 


584-6193 


J. Waymond Hackett 


Robert L. Graves 




Flaget 


Louisville 


776-9000 


Bro. Kirby 


Thomas Finnegan 




Shawnee 


Louisville 


774-2353 


George Sauer 


Robert P. Atkinson 




Portland Christian 


Louisville 


778-6114 


Barl Mullins 


Eugene Schreiner 


3. 


23 DeSales 


Louisville 


361-1361 


Rev. Murray Phelan 


Qyde Smith 




Holy Rosary Acad. 


LiuisviUe 


366-0373 


Sr. Anne Regis 






Inxjuois 


Louisville 


36W)396 


Edwin K. Binford 


Faurest Coogle 




Southern 


Louisville 


969-1331 


T. T. Knight 


Bill Kidd 




Thomas Jefferson 


Louisville 


969-3271 


W. D. Bruce, Jr. 


John Reuther 




Fairdale 


Louisville 


366-1468 


Harry K. Hardin 


Forest Able 








REGION 7 




0. 


25 DuPont Manual 


Louisville 


636-1441 


Arthur J. Ries 


Mike PoUio 




Ky. School for Blind 


Louisville 


897-1583 


William F. Davis 






Louisville Coun. Day 


Louisville 


895-3452 


John R. Gemert 


Laurence TreadweU 




Louisville Male 


Louisville 


582-2613 


Foster J. Sanders 


J:m Huter 




Mercy Academy 


Louisville 


584-5589 


Sr. Mary F'risca 


Kenwyn Boyle 




Presentation Academy 


Louisville 


583-5935 


Sr. Sheila Ann 


Vivian Dunlery 




Trinity 


LouisviUe 


895-6765 


Rev. David HazeUp 


Bob Schmidt 




Ursxiline Academy 


Louisville 


587-1717 


Sr. Laurene 


Miss Theresa Kelty 


D. 


24 Angela Mend 


Louisville 


447-59U 


Sr. Eileen 


Mass Betty Dwyer 




Assumptico 


Louisville 


458-3137 


Sr. M. Oorlnne 


Miss Helen Bianchi 




Eastern 


Middletown 


245-4161 


John W. Trapp 


Ralph Guess 




Ky. Home 


Louisville 


452-2163 




Miss Jane AUen 




Ky. Military Bistitute 


Lyndon 


425-7901 


■N. C. Hodgin 


Frank M. Booth 




Sacred Heart Acad. 


LouisviUe 


897-1811 


Sr. M. Benedncta 


Miss Pat Cooney 




St. Thomas Seminary 


Louisville 


425-5440 


Rev. John BuUer 


Rev. J. Kevin Isert 




Seneca 


Louisville 


451-4330 


WUliam 0. Wilson 


George Unseld 




Waggener 


LouisviUe 


897-0567 


A. K. Draut 


David Leyerle 




Westport 


LouisviUe 


425-2541 


James 0. Gatewood 


Bill Olsen 


D. 


27 Athertoo 


Louisville 


459-3610 


RusseU Gartij 


Gene Minton 




Durrett 


Louisville 


368-5831 


Johnnie P. Lee 


Adrian Cooksey 




Fem Credt 


Fern Creek 


239-3267 


W. K. Niman 


Hugh Gabbard 




Jeffersontown 


Jeffersontown 


267-7486 


William T. Reynolds 


Jack Haury 




Louisville Ool. S<Th 


Louisville 


451-5330 


Nancy E. Kussrow 






St. Xavier 


LouisviUe 


636-2525 


Bro. Conrad CallaJian 


Joseph Reibel 








REGION 8 




0. 


29 Lebanon Junction 


Lebanon Junction 


833-4626 


Marvin F. Stewart 


Glenn Smith 




Mt. Washington 


Mt. Washington 


538-4227 


C. L. Frands 


Jo(hn Games 




Shepherdsville 


iShepherdsviUe 


543-7614 


Roger A. Phelps 


Tom Collins 




TaylorsviUe 


TaylorsviUe 


477-22,30 


Harvey G. Bush 


Iflrry Cheek 


D 


30 Eminence 


Etoidnence 


8454071 


Ora Watts 


J. T. Stinson 




Henry County 


New Castle 


346-8421 


Don M. Turner 


Craynor Sloeme 




Lincoln School 


Lincoln Ridge 


722-8863 


Samuel Robinson 


Gayle Ecton 




Shelby County 


ShelbyviUe 


633-2344 


Bruce Sweeney 


Adolph Rupp, Jr. 




Shelbyville 


ShelbyviUe 


6334869 


Walt Green 


Evan Settle 


D.31 Carroll Cotr?ty 


CarroUton 


732-5215 


James B. Edwards 


Dalton Oak 




Gallatin Couniy 


Warsaw 


567-5041 


Jim Wilson 


Walker A. BdrhfT 




Oldham County 


LaGrange 


279-5269 


Ray Hammers 


Bob Simpson 




Trimble County 


Bedford 


255-3268 


Charles Scott 


Craynor Slone 


O. 32 Georgetown 


Georgetown 


863-3805 


Robert J. Elder 


Wayne Atkins 




Grant County 


Dry Ridge 


824-5001 


Ervin B. Pack 


C. R. Wenderoth 




Owen County 


Owenton 


484-5509 


Cyrus E. Greene 


Ken Martin 




Scott County 


Georgetown 


863-2640 


Ed Sams 


James W. Ballard 




Williamstown 


WiLLiamstown 


6244421 


Jack Williama 


Tom Hatley 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1969 



School 


Address 


Tel. No. 


Principal 


Coach 








REGION 9 




D. 


33 Boone County 


Florence 


371-6020 


C. R. Norman 


Sam Karr 




Dixie Heights 


Fort IMitchell 


341-7650 


Arthur J. Walsh 


William Jones 




Lloyd 


Erhmgor 


341-1922 


Da\qd Whaley 


Charles Perry 




St. Henry 


Erlanger 


341-9309 


St. Joseph Marie 


William Code 




Simon Kenton 


Independence 


356-3541 


Harold B. Williams 


Joe Stark 




Walton-Verona 


Walton 


485-4293 


Billy E. Prewitt 


l;eed Tyler 


D. 


34 Beechwood 


Foil Mitchell 


331^621 


Thelma W. Jones 


John G ubbs 




Covington Catholic 


Covington 


431-5351 


Bio. Donald McKee 


Mote Hils 




Holmes 


Covington 


431-3604 


Richard A. Williams 


Fred Moeves 




Holy Cross 


Covington 


431-1335 


3r. Teresa 


jeorge Schneider 




Ludlow 


Ludlow 


261-6211 


Arthur Tipton 


Paul Kroth 




Notre Dame Acad. 


Covington 


261^300 


Sr. Mary Honora 






Villa Madonna Acad. 


Covington 


261-3441 


Sr. M. Clarita 


Miss Mary L. Elgrim 


D. 


35 Bellevue 


Bellevue 


261-2980 


William Armstrong 


John Gross 




Covinglon Latin 


Cov.ngton 


291-7044 


Rev. Paul Arbogast 


Rev. Edwin B. Heile 




Dayton 


Dayton 


261-4357 


Thomas W. Daley 


Tom Hood 




Newport 


Newport 


261-2S60 


Ei^vin K. Burton 


Stan Amzen 




Newport Catholic 


Newport 


441-7102 


Br. Mark Sullivan 


Ronald Albrinck 


D. 


36 Bishop Brossart 


Alexandria 


635-2108 


Joseph W. Minogue 


Donald Fangman 




Campbel' County 


Alexandria 


635-2191 


Bob Burkich 


Ken Lehkamp 




Highlando 


Fort Thomas 


441-1301 


John Deering 


Jim Bradbury 




St. Thomas 


Fort Thomas 


441-2211 


Sr. Thomas Marie 


Ken Shields 




Silver Grove 


Silver Grove 


441-3873 
REGION 


Robert F. Dozier 
10 


Richard Morris 


D. 


37 Bourbon County 


Paris 


987-2550 


Jack aifford 


Bill Case 




Harrison County 


Cyni'hiana 


234-3911 


Paul Wright 


Jerry Jenkins 




Millersburg Mil. Inst. 


Millersburg 


484-3352 


W.IIiam R. Nutter 


WMham R. Nutter 




Nicholas County 


Carlisle 


289-5584 


Donald G. Elder 


Billy K. Anderson 




Paris 


Paris 


987^545 


Bob Anderson 


E^rl E. Redwine 


D. 


38 .Augusta 


Augusta 


756^82 


Alice Kate Field 


Joe Mahan 




Bracken County 


Brooksville 


735-3891 


Jarvis Parsley 


Jerry Hammons 




Doming 


Mt. Oh vet 


724-2700 


H. 0. Hale 


Marvin L. ijradley 




Pendleton 


Falmouth 


^54-3355 


Terry Cummins 


Philip Wood 


D. 


39 Fleming County 


Flemingsburg 


845-^601 


Martin Marlar 


Robert Hall 




Lewis County 


Vanceburg 


796-2823 


Carl D. Bandy 


Donnie Gaunce 




Mason County 


MaysviUe 


564-6409 


Elza Whalen, Jr. 


James MicChell 




Maysville 


Maysville 


564-3856 


Robert L. Hellard 


Tom Creamer 




St. Patrick 


Maysville 


564-5329 


Sr. M. Jude Bircke 


Bill Forman 




Tollesboro 


Tollesboro 


798-2541 


Charles M. Hughes 


Alan Bane 


D. 


40 George Rogers Clark 


Winchester 


744-6111 


Robert Campbell 


Tom lia per 




Montgomery County 


Mt. Sterling 


498-2250 


Calvin Hunt 


John Crockett 




Mt. Sterling 


Mt. Storhng 


498-3484 
REGION 


Winston Hamilton 
11 


Charles Isihmael 


D. 


41 Frankfort 


Frankfort 


223-6030 


John Randolph 


Jack Black 




Franklin County 


Frankfort 


227-2236 


Robert W. Hoagland 


John Lykins 




Good Shepherd 


Frank.f'ji-t 


223-5041 


Sr. Rose Francis 


Bill Jol-m.son 




Margaret Hall 


Versailles 


873-3751 


C. W, Bell. Jr. 


Mrs. Toni Vise 




Woodford County 


Versailles 


873-5434 


Charles 0. Dawson 


Edward Allin 


D. 


42 Anderson County 


Lawrenceburg 


839-3431 


BiU Rideout 


Jack Upchurch 




Burgin 


Burgin 


748-5170 


Glenn McGehee 


Gilbert Shely, Jr. 




Harrodsburg 


Harrodsburg 


734-3242 


Bobby L. Chaney 


Earl Adkins 




Jessamine County 


NicholasviUe 


8854849 


Zeb Blankenship 


Billy Fryman 




Mercer Couiity 


Harrodsburg 


734-4195 


Kenneth King 


James Gash 




Western 


Sinai 


839-3608 


Robert B. Turner 


Robert Gosdlett 


D. 


43 Biyan Station 


Lexington 


299-4027 


R. L. Grider 


John R. Barlow 




Henry Clay 


Lexington 


255-5581 


Clyde Iflssiter 


Al Prewitt 




Lafayette 


Lexington 


277-5430 


John L. Smith 


Lake Kelly 




Lexington Catholic 


Lexington 


277-4775 


Robei't Nieberding 


Thomas Starns 




Sayre 


Lexington 


254-1361 


Donn Hollingsworth 


Gerald Walton 




Tales Creek 


Lexington 


266-0115 


A. C. Thomas 


Richard Jones 


D. 


44 B(>rea Community 


Berea 


9864911 


Roy N. Walters 


iViliiam Walton 




Estill County 


Irvine 


723-3537 


Paul Hughes 


James Kiser 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1969 


Page Seven 


School 


AddrMs 


Tal. No. 


Principal 


Coach 


Irvine 


Irvine 


723-3616 


Joe Ohr 


Elwood DaugheT<y 


Madison 


Richmond 


623-4959 


Jahn H. Brock 


Ray Vendll 


Madison Central 


Richmond 


623-1530 


James B. Moore 


Don Richardson 


Model Laboratory 


Richmond 


622-2986 
REGION 


Dr. Helen Reed 
12 


Shirley Keans 


D. 45 Boyle County 


Danville 


236-5047 


Roy R. Cjimic 


Lewis Phillips 


Crab Orchard 


Crab Orchard 


355-2541 


James Ledford 


Gene Middleton 


Danville 


Danville 


23&«73 


James McAfee 


David Cottrell 


Garrard County 


Lancaster 


792-2147 


Tohnnie R. LasweU 


Dale Moore 


Hustonville 


Hustonville 


346-3831 


Cecil Purdom 


Albert Wall 


Ky. Scjhl. tor Deaf 


Danville 


236-5132 


R. T. Baughman 


James Morrison 


McKinney 


McKinney 


346-2101 


M. C. Montgomery 


Mike Candler 


Memorial 


Waynesburg 


365-7018 


Lester MulLins 


Jim Reynolds 


Stanford 


Stanford 


365-2191 


Norman McGuffey 


Doug Pendygraft 


D. 4* Casey County 


Liberty 


787-6151 


N. A. Buis 


Danny Trent 


MonticeUo 


Monticello 


348-4681 


Eldon Davidson 


Joe W. Harper 


Russell County 


Russell Springs 


866-2545 


Ron Chumbley 


Allen Feldhaus 


Wayne CJounty 


Monticello 


348-3311 


Arthur J. Lloyd 


Sherman York 


D. 47 Bumside 


Bumside 


561-4?50 


Callas Simpson 


Earl Hicks 


Eubank 


Eubank 


37»4661 


Harold C. Carter 


Denton Ping 


McCreary County 


Whitley Qty 


376-2213 


Eddie L. Brown 


Ralph Robert! 


Nancy 


Nancy 


67&4942 


Dewey Hutt 


Ernest Ramsey 


Pine Knot 


Pine Knot 


354-2511 


Carlos Lester 


Donald Tower 


Pulaski County 


Somerset 


699-1574 


Garva Wilson 


Bill Mauney 


Shopville 


Shapville 


274-3108 


Hobert Thompson 


Hulen K. Wilson 


Sameisflt 


Somerset 


678-4721 


W. B. Jones 


Paul Patterson 


D. 41 Bush 


Uda 


864-2331 


C. Frank Bentley 


Wayne Bowling 


Hazel Green 


East Beinstadt 


843-2135 


nark E. Oiesmit 


Raymond Reed 


Lily 


LUy 


8644330 


Harold Storm 


Bobby Taylor 


London 


London 


864-2181 

REGION 


Leighton Watkin* 
IS 


William Schott 


0. 4» AraiviUe Inst. 


Annville 


364-5109 


Rola"d Simmelink 


Jerry Hacfcer 


Brodhead 


Brodhead 


758-338!> 


D. A. Robbins 


Billy Riddle 


Clay County 


Manchester 


598-2700 


Robert Campbell 


Henry Garrison 


Jackson County 


McKee 


278-7155 


David Cover 


Bruce Morris 


Livingston 


Livingston 


453-2121 


Buford Parkerson 


Preston Parrett 


Mt. Vemon 


Mt. Vemnn 


256-2953 


Qeston Saylor 


Jack L. LasweU 


Oneida Inst. 


Oneida 


847-2202 


David C. Jackaoo 


Winston Kilgore 


D. 51 RarbourviUe 


Barboundlle 


546-3129 


R. E. Koehler 


H. D. Tye 


Corbin 


Corbin 


528-3902 


Louie Martin 


Bill Smith 


Knox Central 


Barbourville 


546-41.* 


Clinton Hammon* 


Don Bin^iam 


Lynn Camp 


Corbin 


528-5429 


P. M. Broughton 


Calvin Vaughn 


Sf. Camillus Academy 


Corbin 


528-5077 


Sr. Mary 


Rev. Tyrell Keller 


Whitley County 


WiU'.amsburg 


549-1360 


WiLLiam Cooper 


G. B. Hendrick.<inB 


Williamsburg 


Williamsburg 


549-3800 


James L. Davis 


Robert Brown 


D. 51 Bell County 


Pineville 


337-2329 


James A. PursifuU 


deo PursifuU 


Henderson Settle. 


Frakes 


337-3618 


Herby J. Roark 


Wayland Jones 


Lone Jack 


Four Mile 


337-2435 


C. E. Calloway 


Shirley Goodin 


Middlesboro 


Middlesboro 


248-1000 


Lloyd Sharp 


Willie Hendrick,*!! 


Pineville 


Pineville 


337-2433 


F.ffie Amett 


Lee GambreU 


Red Bird 


Beverly 


337-2848 


Donald G. Scott 


Karl Kingsley 


D. 52 Cumberland 


Cumberland 


5894625 


Ross Barger 


William Sellars 


Evarts 


EvSLTtS 


837-2502 


O. G. Roaden 


Doyle Troutman 


Harlan 


Harlan 


573-3711 


R. B. Singleton 


George Francis 


James A. Cawood 


H:i Ian 


573-5027 


W C. McFarland 


James Howard 


Lynch 


Lynch 


848-5486 
REGION 


Richard A. Smitbson 
14 


Ed Miracle 


D. 53 Fleming-Neon 


Fleming 


855-7597 


Roy T. Reasor 


Larry Kincer 


Jenkins 


Jenkins 


832-2184 


David H. Banks 


William D. Back 


Letoher County 


Letcher 


633-2524 


D. C. Taylor 


Danny Baites 


Whitesburg 


Whitesburg 


633-2339 


J. M. Biu-kich 


U. G. Horn 



Page Right 


1 


"HE KENTU 


CKY HIGH SaiOOL ATI 


ILETE FOR JANUARY, 1969 


School 


Address 


Tel. No. 


Principal 


Coach 


D. 54 Buckhom 


Buckhom 


39»-7176 


Fred W. Johnson 


Winfred Smith 


Combs Memorial 


Jeff 


436-2500 


Bingham Brashear 


P;iul Combs 


Hazard 


Hazard 


436-3711 


1-;;11 Hurt 


Roscoe Shackleford 


Leatherwood 


Leatherwood 


67S4431 


Robert Lootens 


William Fannin 


Leslie County 


Hyden 


672-2337 


Raleigh Couch 


Wendell Wilson 


M. C. Napier 


Hazard 


436-4541 


Dacker Combs 


Albert Combs 


D. 55 Breathitt County 


Jackson 


666-2805 


Millard ToUiver 


1) 1 1 ]5ur;i) 1 


Carr Creek 


Carr Creek 


642-3585 


Morton Combs 


Morton Combs 


Cordia 


Hazard 


251-3875 


AUce H. Slone 


1 ..)bv R. Smith 


Hindman 


Hindman 


785-5361 


Vesper SJingleton 


Pearl Combs 


Jackson 


Jackion 


666-5164 


James B. Goff 


James B. Goff 


Knott County 


Pippa Passes 


785-5783 


Edward Madden 


James E. Moore 


Oakdale Christian 


Jackson 


666-5422 


Donald .And ews 


R ch ii-d RussoU 


Riverside Christian 


Lost Creek 


666-2359 


Harold E. Bamett 


Doran Hosteller 


D. 56 Hazel Green Acad. 


Hazel Green 


6624475 


Gfoi-se Buch;uian 


Larry Slurgil 


Lee County 


BeattyvUle 


464-8126 


Gordon F. Cook 


Heber Dunaway 


Owsk?y County 


Bojnev.lle 


593-5185 


W. 0. Gabbard 


Paul Smith 


Powell Coimty 


Stanton 


6634475 


Fairce 0. Woods 


Robert Hoggard 


Wolfe County 


Campton 


668-8565 
REGION 


Homer Jones 
15 


Granville Deaton 


Inez 


Inez 


298-3264 


WUburn Goble 


Billv Ray Cassady 


Joiin-on Central 


Pa.ntsville 


7894S90 


W. H. Conley 


Paul W. WJliams 


Louisa 


Louisa 


6384574 


Ma.\ Calhoun 


Robert Prichard 


Paintsville 


Paintsville 


789-3881 


Paul W. Trimble 


Gary Knight 


SalyersviUe 


Saivi>rsville 


349-2011 


G. L. Arnett 


JajK S;aiiford 


Warfield 


Warfield 


395-5341 


Russell H. Stepp 


John Wilhams 


D. 5« Betsy Layne 


Betsy L.iyne 


478-2255 


O-scar F. Bush 


Tommy Boyd 


Garrett 


Garrett 


368-34a 


Burnice Gearhart 


John CampbeU, Jr. 


McDowell 


McDowell 


377-6202 


Lloyd Stumbo 


Pete Grigsby, Jr. 


Martin 


Martin 


285-3011 


Philip Dingus 


Denzil Halbert 


Maytown 


Langley 


285-3.346 


Edwin V. Stewart 


Gene Erasure 


Prestonsburg 


Prestonsburg 


686-2252 


Woodrow Allen 


Robert Slone 


Wayland 


Wayland 


358-3911 


Johnnie Case 


Jimmy R. Cox 


Wheelwright 


Wheelwright 


938-2110 


VV. R. Jamerson 


James F. Francis 


D. 5» Dorton 


D -)i lon 


639-2832 


Charles Wright 


D>n Blair 


Millard 


Rjute :\ Pikeville 


432-33S;n 


Arson Justice 


James E. Carter 


Mullins 


R. 1, Pikeville 


432-2733 


Phenis Potter 


Biui Jack Burnerte 


Pikeville 


Pikeville 


437-6870 


Jack D. Fugate 


Wayne Martin 


Virgie 


Virgie 


639-2774 


Fred W. Cox 


Bobby Osborne 


D. 60 Belfry 


Belfry 


353-7362 


W. F. Doane 


MUIard Bevins 


Elkhom aty 


Elkhom aty 


754-7981 


James V. Powell 


?.I.ke Terry 


Feds Creek 


Feds Creek 


835-2286 


Hobert Dye 


Ronald Reynolds 


Johns Creek 


R. 1, Pikeville 


437-6361 


James T. Dotson 


Aubrey Taylor 


Phelps 


Phelps 


456-7716 
REGION 


James E. Branham 
16 


Ronald Thompson 


D. 61 Bath County 


Owingsville 


674-2501 


Charles R. Gilley 


Julian Cunningham 


Ezel 


Ezel 


7254545 


Conrad A. Rowl^md 


Henry E. Cochran 


Menifee County 


Frenchburg 


768-2373 


Hiram C. Walters 


.^'1 .Uanl^enship 


Morgan County 


West Liberty 


743-3705 


Richard Jett 


Charles E. Cain 


Rowan County 


Morehead 


7844153 


Sherman R. Amett 


Warren Cooper 


University Ereck. 


Morehead 


7844181 


Rondal Hart 


Dienzel Dennis 


D. 62 Carter 


Carter 


474-6121 


WilUam N. Collins 


Chester E. Heid 


Hitchins 


Hitchins 


474-5784 


Leonard Marshall 


Roy F. Murphy 


Olive HiU 


Olive Hill 


286-24,81 


.Viidrew J. FuUz 


liert Greene 


Pri chard 


Grayson 


474-5421 


H. R. Bowling 


Gary Salyer 


Sandy Hook 


Smriy Hook 


738-5225 


John Vansant 


Jesse J. Adkins 


D. 63 Greenup 


Greenup 


473-3781 


\\':idt- B. Womack 


Raniey Fletcher 


McKeU 


South Shore 


932-3323 


Chester Bruce 


Ed Lowdenback 


Raceland 


Raceland 


836-8221 


Cobbie Lee 


Bill Haines 


RusseU 


Russell 


836-3531 


Frank V. FiresUne 


Marvin Meredith 


Wurtland 


Wurtland 


636-5931 


Charles Banks 


l^rry Jordon 


D. 64 Boyd County 


R. 2, Ashland 


928-6473 


Douglas Cole 


Mike Jupin 


Catlettsburg 


Catlettsburg 


739-1663 


U'ilLam Holbrook 


D lie Sexton 


Fairview 


Ashland 


324-9226 


Fred E. Madden 


George Cooke 


Holy Family 


Ashland 


324-7040 


Sr. Amabalis 


William T. CarroU 


Paul G. Blazer 


AsWand 


3254706 


Qyde Hunsciker 


Harold Cole 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1969 



Page Nine 



FRANKFORT-CLASS A FINALIST 




(Left to Right) Front Row: MgT. Mike Glenn, Mgr. Estill Hamphrey, Mjr. Bruce Perkins. Second 
Row: Roderick Collins, Matt Dryden, Tommy Brooks, Willie Vandermeer, Bruce Smith, Larry Farrls, 
John Allen, Steve Glenn, Jim Rail. Tim Harrod, Jimmy Dixon, Charlea Smith, Steve Mason, Joey Maynard, 
Lauren Roberts, Steve Rogers. Third Row: Phillip Wainscott, Billy Onan, Kenny Goin, Larry Roberta, 
Gary Marshall, Arthur Buffin, David Keith, Fodes Phelps. Kenny Aitken, Jerry Calhoun. Brace Duncan, 
Gayle Woods, David Pierce, Mike Taylor, Mickey Mills, Ass't Coach Elmer Goodson. Fourth Row: Coach 
0. C. Leathers. Larry Robinson. Tommy Clay. Tommy Williams, Greg Maynard. Fantley Smither. David 
Lauffhlin. David Cheek, John Barton, Tommy Bennett, Ben Smith, John Rogers. Mac Qoarles, Hiuton 
Wehs. Ass't Coach Raymond Webb. 

FULTON— CLASS A. REGION I, CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Mgr. Avery Hancock, Mike Smith, William Mitchell, Joe Mann. Greg 
Scates, Charles Whitnel, Hoyt Moore. Mgr. Chuck Flynn. Second Row: Mgr. Mark Owens. Mike Morgan. 
Jeff Barkley. Gary Martin. Marvin Green, Bob Engel, Chuck Curtis. Bob Nanney, James Myers, Steve 
Erickson, Mgr. William Lee. Third Row: Ass't Coach Lynn Newton, Dick Jones. Mike Sisson. David 
Jones, Sam Pirtle, Terry Dallas. Steve Fly. Gary Mcintosh, Charles Hefly, David Peeples. Coach Larry 
Shanks. Fourth Row: Allen Kimbell. Teddy Adams, Dennis Lohans, Stanley Scates, David Winston. James 
Pawlukiewicz. John Ragsdale, Eddie Williamson, Kim Homra, Bill Smith. James McCarthy. 

MT. STERLING— CLASS A, REGION 3, DISTRICT 2. CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Benny Shnltz, Larry Henderson. Mike Maney, Don McReynolds, Jim 
McDonald, Baddy Barnard, Bobby Davis. Danny Berryman. Larry Brooks. Larry Clonyers, John McDonald, 
Joe Barnard. Second Row: Gary Orme. Larry Garrett, Mike Gatewood, Charley Bill Owens, Doug Cunning- 
ham, Jim Bonfield, Jack Carrington. Bob Unger. Robert Brooks, Steve McGuire, Jim Malone. Eddie Miller, 
Third Row: James Hunt, John Eddy, Jerry Hamilton, Robert Hamilton. Estill Compton, Steve Hatfield, 
Dennis Bonfield, Tom Orme. Gary Blake, George Calico. Fourth Row: C. D. Highley, Jerry Spencer* Terry 
Barnard, Tom Breeze. Mac McCormick, Robert Garrison. Dan Lane. Richard Jones. 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JA.NUARY, 1969 



The Flying Dutchman 




It is a brand new year in Kentucky. It's 1969 and 
time to look backward to see what good we may have 
accomplished in 1%8, and to look fOi-ward to some ol 
the events the new year wiU herald. 

As the Dutchman travels that "Memory Lane of 
1968," a bit of melancholia creeps into his column as 
he recalls that -this is the year that was, and the one 
which ended twenty-seven consecutive years of basket- 
ball clinic work for the K.H.S.A.A. and closed out cher- 
ished associations with those friends on the National 
Basketball Rules Committee of the United States and 
Canada. 

A look ahead also reflects more sentiment because 
1969 will bo the Dutchman's last meeting with his State 
Tournnmenl Basketball Officials prior to their going on 
the Door at Freedom H;ill to conduct a new and greater 
school ix>y classic. Those get-togethers to discuss plays 
and procedures are one of the "behind the scenes" ac- 
tivibes which are aimed at producing better and more 
uniform officiating. The month of May of 1969 will see 
the last Flying Dutchman cx)lumn appear in the Ken- 
tuclcy High School Athlete. 

Looking backward again the Dutchman asks. "What 
was your Christmas like in 1968?" To make Christmas 
of 1969 better, let's read the foUowing by Henry Van 
Dyke as he asks, "Can You Keep Christmas?" 

"Aie you willing to forget what you ha\e done for 
other people, and to lemember what other people have 
done tor you; to ignore what the world owes you and 
to tnink what you owe the world; to see that your fellow 
men are just as real as you are, and try to look behind 
their faces to their hearts, hungry for joy; to own that 
probably the only good reason for your existence is not 
what you are going to get out of life, but what you are 
going to give to life; to close your book of complaints 
against the management of the universe, and look 
around you for a place where you can sow a few seeds 
of happiness — are you willing to do these things even 
for a day? 

"Then you can keep Christmas." 

The Flying Dutchman projects are aimed at 'having 
Chnslmas the year around. To convince yourself that 
tliis is true, write a letter to the Dutohman now telling 
him of a crippled kid you are working with and recom- 
mend him for the Game Guy of 1969 award; write an- 
other letter telling of that man or woman who qualifies 
for the Corn Cob Pipe of Honor award because of un- 
selfish service rendered another with no thought of 
personal profit or gain. You'U feel like you've really 
had a good day when you see firsthiuid the happiness 
such letters can bring to others. 

Because the doors we close behind us must remain 
closed and because there are new doors in 1969 to be 



opened, it can be a very exciting and progressive year 
for Kentucky's communities. This can t>e the year when 
your efforts promote the development of a park and 
recreation program in your community. One Kentucky 
county which is eager to start a pitrks and recreation 
program and hire a recreation director writes to ask 
two questions; (li Should the Directo- be a party pohci- 
cian? (2) How important is a college degree in the 
Director's worK in parks and recreation? 

The answer to question number one, "Should the 
recreation Director be a party polittcLan?' ' is a 
straightforward NO. This columnist has no interest in 
party politicians in professional fields, but he does have 
a tremendous interest in politics as they affect good 
government. The field of parks and recreation is a pro- 
fessional one. 

Your recreation program will have a good chance to 
succeed if a non-partisan Board of Recreation is orga- 
nized according to Chapter 97 of Kentuci<y Re\ised 
Statutes, and then only li that Board hires employees, 
retains, and discontinues their services on a merit basis. 
There is a place in Kentucky where the present recrea- 
tion director wrote his resignation tlie day he was 
hired, more than two decades ago. This re.5ignatioii 
becomes effecti\e the day "spoils system" replaces 
rhe "merit system" in his park and recreation program. 
Let's censure now aU party politicians who visuaLze in 
the new park .ind recreation programs being born in 
Kentucky additional opportunities to create new political 
jobs and build "bigger and more inefficient spoils sys- 
tems." Education, recreation and parks offer profes- 
sional careers to men and women and their operations 
should be free of political interference. 

The answer to question number two. "How impor- 
tant are college degrees to your recreation leader?", 
is straightforward .again. The degree itself means noth- 
ing. If your appliciint has learned to use the "tools of 
education" while fulfilling the requirements for the 
degree of bachelor, master, or doctor — this d^tes mean 
something. 

Education is most important to directors of parks and 
recreation; but this columnist, with his share of college 
degrees plus high school and college teaching e.xperi- 
ence, has learned better than to judge an applicant's 
education or qualification by the number of degrees he 
holds. If the recreation director your community ;ias in 
mind is educated and dedicated to public seivice, he has 
the iniport;mt qualifications. 

The "tools of education" are supplied by our educa- 
tional institutions. E.xperience is the educator. F*roper 
usage of the "tools" expedites the building of an educa- 
tion This does not prevent individuals unable to get the 
"tools" in higher educational institutions from getting 
them elsewhere. In the early part of the century. Dr. 
H. H. Cherry drctmied of a glorious college which 
would one day stand on the highest hiUtop in Bowling 
Green. Today, Western Kentucky University stands as 
a monument to him, the most highly educated man I 
ever knew; but one who was nc\er privileged to hold a 
college degree. Besides being educated, remember that 
he was also dedicated. 

The formula for selecting your recreation director is 
EDUCATION PLUS DEDICATION. 

The December issue of the Athlete carried real good 
news for pai'ks and recreation in Kentucky in the an- 
nouncement that Franklin's W. H. "Johnie" Crowdus 
has been elected a member of the K.H.S.A.A. Board of 
Control. "Johnie" Crowdus is one of the few authorities 
on recreation in Kentuckj' and has rendered tons of 
unselfish service in this field. That's why the Dutchman 
sends the first Corn Cob Pipe of Honor for this new year 
to my old football teanunate, W. H. Crowdus. 
"Happy New Year." 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1%9 



Page Eleven 



The Critics 



An Appraisal 



In Memoriam 



"The galleries are full of critics. They play no ball. 
They fight no fights. They make no mistakes because 
they attempt nothing. Down in the arena are the doers. 
They make mijstakes because they attempt many things. 
The person who makes no mistakes lacks boldness and 
the spirit of adventure. He is the one who never, never 
tries anything new. He is the ;irake on the wheel of 
progress. 

Aj.u yet, it cannot be truly said that he makes no 
mistakes — the very tact that he takes no chances, tries 
nothing, does nothing e.^cept criticize those who do try 
— is perhaps the biggest error possible in a lifetime." 

The above woixis, written by Papyrus for another 
age, may well have been written to describe the feelings 
of a schoolboy athlete who has just been scorned, and 
perhaps even cursed, by a "frantic fan," who, by mere 
geographical chance, has made a certain school "his" 
school. 

Why the scorn? Why the cursing? Perhaps this 17- 
year-old lad, admittedly not yet mature in mind or 
body, had fumbled. Perhaps he missed a crucial lay-up 
or, maybe he fell appix)aching the last hurdle. 

Instead of this "Lsappom;ed lad receiving the under- 
standing he so desperately need.-, he is held up to 
ridicule by his self-appointed peeio, who, for the most 
part, never appeared themselves in any sort of contest. 
Take a good look at the quality of adult who is con- 
stantly berating youngsters. Then get down on your 
knees and thank God that the intersoholastic program 
will iiever be allowed to be controlled by this type of 
person. 

It must be very frustrating for the yoimg athlete who, 
after being taught that the real purposes of athletics, 
discipline, school spirit, competitive awareness, physi- 
cal fi'tness, etc.; firiis out that a small group of people 
use his precious athletic skills to vent their frustrations 
on players, coaches, and officials. 

Consider for a moment the plight of the young coach, 
who was hired as a teacher first, and a coach second, 
when he finds living conditions in the community un- 
bearable because the basketball team had a 10-12 rec- 
ord. Small wonder that the mortality rate at the high 
school coaching level remains the highest in the coach- 
ing field. 

Some wiU argue that when a spectator pays his ad- 
mission fee, he has a "right" to show any emotions 
short of mayhem. These pseudo-philosophers couldn't 
be more wrong. Let's get the "rights" and the "respon- 
sibilities" where they belong. It is the "right" of the 
admission-paying adult to witness an atlhletic contest 
between two schools, and to watch the more talented 
students of those schools perform. Certainly, these 
so-called followers cannot be granted unlimited privi- 
leges to tear down a program which ithey had no part 
in building. 

Each school sponsoring an athletic contest has the 
"responsibility" to properly administer and police 
every facet of the scheduled activity. It is their further 
"responsibility" to be sure that persons hired to pohce 
an event actually do their job. Adequate police protec- 
tion means little when no action is taken against the 
outsiders bent on making a mockery of the contest. 

High school atlletics have survived and will continue 
to survive the constant attacks of the have-nothings, 
want-nothings, and the critical do-nothings. This sur- 
vival will be insured as long as all concerned remem- 
ber that high school athletics are designed for the devel- 
opment of situdents, not for revenue-producing mobs of 
"frantic fans" who have never made a mistake simply 
because "they've never tried." 

—THE PA'THLETE 




Coy Dyehouse 

Leslie Coy Dyehouse, 48, football coach at Garrard 
County High School and principal of Lancaster Elemen- 
tary School, died at his home on November 23, 1968, 
after he suffered an apparent heart attack. He had been 
forced to drop his coaching duties midway through the 
1968 season for health reasons. 

Mr. Dyehouse was a native of Garrard County and 
had been with the school system for more tihan twenty 
years. A veteran of World War II, he was a member ol 
Lancaster Lodge No. 104, F(fcAM, and Phi Delta Kappa. 

Survivors include his wife, Mrs. Inez Howard Dye- 
house; a daughter. Miss Kitty Bright Dyehouse, Lancas- 
ter; two brothers, James F. Dyehouse, Dayton, Ohio, 
and Elbert Dyehouse, Garrard County; two sisters, Mrs. 
Odus Sutton, Garrard Counly, and Mrs. Margaret Hop- 
kins, Norwood, Ohio. 

A Garrard County High Sdhool student wrote the fol- 
lowing moving tribute in memory of Coach Dyehouse: 

"Some men go through hfe with no real purpose or 
goal. Odhers set standards for themselves, but set them 
low enough to be easily reached, without any real effort 
on Lheir part. A few men set their goals high, and strive 
to see them obtained. These are the natural-born lead- 
ers and the truly great men of our world. 

"What actually constitutes greatness is a question to 
which there are many different answers. But I think we 
all agree that any man who has devoted his life to 
teaching the youth of the community would be consid- 
ered great. Mr. L. C. Dyehouse was such a man. 

"Benjamin Franklin once said, 'I think that nothing is 
of more importance for the public weal than to form and 
train our youth in wisdom and virtue.' This must have 
been Mr. Dyehouse's motto, for, as principal of the 
largest grade school in the county, he promoted all 
areas of elementary education. I know of no other per- 
son who has worked as hard as Mr. Dyehouse worked 
during his 48-year lifetime and during his 20-yoar service 
with the Garrard County school system to better prepare 
the youth of this community for a brighter future as 
responsible citizens. 

"As head coach of Garrard Ooimty High School's 
football team, he earned the nickname, 'Garrard Coun- 
ty's Mr. Football,' and was named C.K.C. Coach of the 
Year in 1967. He loved f(x>tball and lived to coach. He 
instilled this same love for the sport into every player 
he coached, for he believed football to be the perfect 
sport. As head coach, Mr. Dyehouse didn't seem to 
have a disciphne problem among his boys, because his 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1969 



authority earned their respect for him and for the 
ganie. This respect gave each player something to 
play for, a desu'e to win. They were proud to play for 
Mr. Dyehouse because they admired the leadership of 
this illustrious man. 

"As students of Garrard County High School we all 
loved, admired, and respected this man, for we knew 
(hat his interesst was genuine. When he addressed the 
entire student body at a football pep rally, no one had 
to tell us to give him a standing ovation. WTien he spoke, 
no one had to remind us to listen to e\-ery word he said, 
because each student could tell by the way he spoke 
that this man knew what he was talking about. 

"Mr. Dyehouse will be missed at Garrard County 
High, but in no way will he be forgotten. He will live on 
in our memories cind serve as our motivation for living 
a life of service to others. Let us set high goals, devote 
ourselves to a worthy cause, and ,';tri\'e always to do 
that which is right. These things let us do in remem- 
brance of LesUe Coy Dyehouse." 



FILMS 



The films listed below are in the Film Library of the 
University of Kentucky College ef Education. The rental 
prices shown do not apply to schools, which use one of the 
special subscriptions service plans, offered by the Bureau of 
Audio-Visual Materials. 

Baseball 

BASEBALL ALL-STAR G.^IE OF 1936, J-s-c-a, 2 reels, 

color, $1.00 

The j\ll-Star Game of 1956 was played in Griffith 
Stadium at Washington. S!:ars of the American and 
National Leagues are pictured in action during the pre- 
game activities. Highlights of the game are shown as 
the National League wins by a score of 7-3. 
BASEBALL .ALL-STAR GAME OF 1958, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, 

color, $1.00 

Twenty-five all-stars from the Americar League 
defeat an equal number of National League greats by 
a score of 4-3 at Baltimore. Close-ups ol the baseball 
stars of today and interesting plays of the gaine arc 
shown in the film. (KHSAA) 
BASEBALL ALL-STAR GAJVIE OF 1965, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, 

color, $1.00 

In the 36',h all-star game at the home of the Minne- 
sota Twins in Minneapolis the National League con- 
quered the American League by 6-5. A crowd of over 
47.000 saw Willie Mays hit the first pitch of the g:ime 
for a home run. (KHSAA) 
BASEBALL ALL-STAR G.\ME OF 1966, j-s-c-a, l>i 

reels, color, $1.00 

The greats of the National League battle the star.': 
of the American League in the new 26 million dollar 
Busch Stadium at St. Louis. The National League won 
the game in the tenth inning as Ned McCarvcr scored 
on a single by Maury Wills. Clo.se-ups of the stars are 
shown as they warm up for each game. (KHS.'VA) 
BASEBALL ALL-STAR GAME OF 1967, e-j-s-c-a, 3 

reels, color, $1.00 

The National and American Lea.gue All-Star Game 
was played in the new Anaheim Stadium, home of the 
California Angels. The Phillies' Richie Allen homered in 
the first innins; and Frank Robinson of Baltimore tied 
the score in the second. In the fifteenth inning Tony 
Perez of Cincinnati broke the lie and won the game for 
the National League by hitting a home' run. (KHS.A.\) 
BASEBALL HALL OF FAME, c-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, 

$1.00 

This film shows the annual meeting at Cnoperslowri. 
N. Y., when hew names are added to the Hall of Fame 
li.st. Numerous stars of the past return to the shrine 
each year at this time and are shown as their feats on 
the diamond are related. The histoiy of Coopcrstown 



and the purpose of the Hall of Fame are explained in 

the picture. 

BATTER UP, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels (22 Min.), color, $1.00 

Produced by National and American Leagues of 
Baseball. Shows the proper techniques of batting as 
demonstrated by hitting .stars of the majors, Stan 
Musial, Ted Williams, Mickey Mantle, Ernie Banks, 
Wiliie Mays and others. 
BATTING FUNDAMENTALS, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Basic skills which must be mastered before one 
becomes an accomplished hitter. But selection, stance, 
grip, stride, swing and follow-; hrou,gh are clearly dem- 
onstrated in this film by professional players. 
THE BATTING STARS OF BASEBALL, s-c-a, 3 reels, 
$1.00 

Who ate the big names among batters and what 
makes them good? Watch tlie featured hitters as shown 
in this film, learn the secrets of their styles and forms, 
and try it yourself. For clubs as well as classes. 
CATCHING IN BASEBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

The basic skills in catching baseball are presented 
in this fUm. How to catch a high rapid ball, a batted 
ball, a thrown ball, and a ground ball are shown. Stance, 
motion and close-up photography are used to enable the 
viewer to follow each step or movement in each of the 
basic sldUs. 
CATCHING STARS OF BASEBALL, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $1.00 

This Ls a film designed to assist in the coaching of 
catchers but it is also interesting and entertaining. 
Correct methods and techniques of receiving, throwing, 
signaling and fielding are illustrated by Bill Dickey, 
Sherman LoUar, Yogi Berra and Roy Claimpanella. 
DEMOCRACY OF BASEBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $1.00 

The purpose of this fibn is for further development 
of young baseball players in our modern democracy and 
illustrates this through sports and sports competition. 
This fibn includes a brief history of baseball along with 
a cavalcade of pa.st and present stars. 
DOUBLE-PLAY KINGS OF BASEBALL, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, 
$1.00 

This film presents an analysis of the double play in 
baseball. Different players from several major leagues 
are shown in action. F:eld;ng, tagging, and throwing 
are illustrated and explained. 
FIFTY YEARS OF BASEB.\LL. e-j-s-c^, 3 reels, $1.00 

Facts of the irmiiortal stars of baseball are recalled 
in this fifty years of memories. Shows some famous 
oldtimers as their exploits are narrated and great 
moments of action in the lives of the more recent 
baseball heroes. (KHS.AA) 
HITTING IN BASEBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Slow motion and close-up photography are used to 
follow accurately and graphically the basic fundamen- 
tals of hitting in baseball. Coordination of feel, legs, 
hips, shoulders, arm, and head is explained. How to 
select a bat, how to hold it, and correct batting position 
arc shown. 
INFIELD PLAY AT 1st AND 3rd, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $1.00 

The fundamentals and finer points of infield play at 
first and third bases are illustrated by big league play- 
ers. Fielding, stance, throwing, tagging runners, etc., 
pictured often in slow motion. Sponsored by A. G. 
Spalding Co., the American and National Leagues. 
INSIDE BASEBALL, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $1.00 

Fundanient;Us of baseball, including pitching, bat- 
ting, fielding, and bavc--running, arc demonstrated. 
Note: This fUm was placed with the library through 
the courtesy of the Kentucky High School Athletic 
Association. 
KNOW YOUR BASEBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, $1.00 

Modern photographic techniques, sutli as: slop ac- 
tion, split screen, and instant replay are combined with 
(oiorful play situations to provide a truly outstanding 
presentation of the rules of baseb;Ul. (KHSAA) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1969 

OCTOBER MADNESS— THE WORLD SERIES, e-j-s-c^ 
2% reels, $1.00 

Shows many of the unforgettable feats performed by 
players as they happened in World Series past. Dra- 
matic plays that made everlasting heroes are highlighted 
along with the anguish felt by ilhe victims. (KHSAA) 
OFFICIAL BASEBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, $1.00 
Informative and entertaining play situations used to 
depict official rules interpretations covering the ptoses 
of batting, piitching, base running, fielding and umpiring. 
Stimulates interest and knowledge for fans, players, 
officials and baseball administrators. 
PITCHING STARS OF BASEBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, 
$1.00 

Shows four of the leading pitchers in action. Types 
of pitches and methods of practice are portrayed. 
PLAY BALL, SON, j-s, IVz reels, $2.50 

Joe Cronin introduces this film showing a group of 
fourteen-year-old boys who are experts in baseball. 
Correct methods of 'hitting, catching, and throwing are 
desmonstrated in natural and show motion. Based on 
book by Bert V. Dunne. 
STRIKE THREE, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, color, $1.00 

Designed to train pitchers. The greatest pitchers in 
the gaane today show the pitching and fielding finesse 
;hat brought -them fame. 
THROWING IN BASEBALL, e-j^-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Slow motion, close-up and stop photography are 
used in presenting the basic fundamentals of throwing 
in baseball. Instructions are given for the overthrows, 
three-quarter side, side, and underhand throws. Coordi- 
nation of foot and arm motion is stressed, as well as 
coordination of ithe body as a whole. 
TOUCHING ALL BASES, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, $1.00 

This film is intended to teach youngsters baseball by 
showing various American League stars playing their 
positions. It is also intended to give fans as a whole a 
better understamding and knowledge of the national 
pastime. The film sihows Father Flanagan and his Boys 
Town team, the Hall of Fame ceremonies in Coopers- 
town, N. Y., and scenes from night baseball games. 
THE UMPIRE IN BASEBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $1.00 

Summarizes importance of the umpire to the base- 
ball game. Explanation of the duties of the umpire and 
also qualifications for job, showing where they receive 
their training. 
WORLD SERIES OF 1954, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $1.00 

Highlights of the game between the Cleveland Indi- 
ans and ;he New York Giants are shown in this film. 
The Giants, sparked by the sensational hitting of 
Rliodcs, defeyted the Indians in four siraigh; games. 
The Indians had set a record for the number of games 
vVon in wmning the American League pennant. 
WORLD SERIES OF 1955. c-j-.s-c-a, 4 reels, color, $1.00 
Bi'ooldyn Dodgers and the New York Yankees are 
shown in this film. The commentai-y leading up to each 
game makes the film interesting as the Dodgers win 
tj^.c world championship. 
WORLD SERIES OF 1957, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels, $1.00 

The AmcMc'in Loagiio champion New York Yankees 
carry the series the full seven games before bowing to 
the Milwaukee Braves, champion of the National 
League. The film catcher most of the hitting tuid :-hows 
the plays in which nms were scored in each game. The 
narrator. Lew Fonseca, describes the play and fills in 
the b.ickground with interesting bits of information con- 
cerninj the game. 

WORLD .SERIES OF 1959. e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels, color, $1.00 

The highlights of the six games played in the series 

between the Los Angeles Dodgers and the Chicago Wliite 

Sox aie shown in this film. Tlie Dodgers won the series 



Page Thirteen 



Individual Champions 




Tim Harry 



Mike Haywood 



Individual champions in the State Cross Country 
meets held in Louisville on November 2, 1968. were Tim 
Harry of DeSales (Qass AAA) and Mike Haywood of 
Ashland (Class AA). 



by defeating the White Sox four games to two. Most of 
the scoring plays are filmed, along with many of the 
outstanding defensive plays. The color that goes with 
these games is captured in the film 
WORLD SERIES OF 1960, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels (44 Min), 

color, $1.00 

Exciting moments of the seven games between the 
New York Yankees of the American League carried the 
series its full seven games beiore bowjng to National 
League Pittsburgh Bucs. Highlights of aU seven games 
are shown and the action described. 
WORLD SERIES OF 1961, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels (44 Min.), 

color, $1.00 

Narrated by Mel Allen, this film sliows the Cincinnati 
Reds were able to win only the second game in the 
series against the New York Yankees. Superb pitching 
of Whitey Ford and batting power of the Yankees 
brought them ithe world's championship after five 
games. 

WORLD SERIES OF 1962, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, color, $1.00 

Key plays from all seven games are shown as the 
New Yorl; Yankees of the American League retain the 
world's championship by defeating the San Francisco 
Giants by the score of 1^ in the final game. 
WORLD SERIES OF 1963, j-s-c-a, 4 reels (44 Min.), 
color, $1.00 

Shows highlights of games in which the Los Angeles 
Dodgers won the baseball championship by defeating 
the New York Yankees in four straight games. 
WORLD SERIES OF 1964, j-s-c-a, 4 reels (44 Min.), 
color, $1.00 

The St. Louis Cardinals topped the New York Y'an- 
kees in the first game, 9-5, and went on to win the series 
to become the world's champions for 1965. Covers all the 
exciting plays in the games. 
WORLD SE.'tlES OF 1965, c-j-s-c-a, 4 reels, color, $1.00 

Shows highlights of the gaanes in which the Minne- 
.sota Twins take the first two games at Minneapolis from 
Los Angeles and the Dodgers come back to win the ne.xt 
four games with Sandy Koufax pitching the seventh 
game for the world's champion. (KHSAA) 
WORLD SERIES OF 19;i(;, j-s-c-a. 4 reels, color, $1.00 

The Baltimore Orioles ama/ed the sports world as 
they defeated the Los Angeles Dodgers in four straight » 
games to win the world championship. Even the great 
Saiidy Koufax and Don Di-ysdale coiild not silence the 



Pase Fourteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1969 



bats of Frank Robinson and Bixx)ks Robinson. Shows 
the action plays in all tour games. (KHSAA) 
WORLD SERIES OF 1967, e-J-s-c-a, 4 reels, color, $1.00 
The St. Louis Cardinals need the full seven games to 
win tlie championship over the Boston Red Sox. Hari-y 
Carey narrates the play as Jim Lonborg, aided by 
slugger Carl Yastremski, wins two games for the Sox 
but cannot match the three wms by Bob Gibson of the 
Cards. (KHSiUJ 

The Purpose of Sports 

By Tim Horgan 

Everybody keeps saying how terrible it is, how 
tragic, and the worst part is that it could happen again. 
There is certainly no guarantee it won't happen again, 
the way this country has turned inside out. but there 
are many things we can do to help prevent it. There are 
so many tilings I don't know where to begin. 

By "we" I mean you and me and all of us who are 
in any way in\'olved in spor;s. The antidote to the poi- 
son that has infected our counti-y is very compUcated 
but sports is a part of it. Sports is a big part of it 
because sports is still the best way to reach the 
majority of our children and teach them what they have 
to know m ore ?r to make this a sane and joyful society 
again. 

What do they have to kno\. .' Self-discipline. Respect 
for authorily. How to compete within the rules. How to 
win and lose. How to be tDugh, compassionate, doter- 
mined and gracious under pressure. Sports can teach 
them all these things and it can also make them want 
to be strong and healthy in body, mind and spirit. And 
it can satisfy their great need to be recognized, to 
accomplish and to excel. 

This is what sports should do for our children but h-'s 
not done for too many years now. I don't know why, but 
for the past 10 or 15 years we seem to have gotten 
away from the intangibles and we italk and write mosiUy 
about money, money, money — ^how big the bonus, how 
grand tlie scholarship. 

You become a bore if you discuss such viitues as 
courage, perseverance, teamwork, loyalty, honor. Yet, 
without these, sports serves no purpose at all; without 
them our children might as well take up needlepoint or 
the violin. So, the first thing we have to do is begin to 
celebrate these virtues whenever we find them. One way 
we can do this is to play in our Little League and Pop 
Warner and other training programs those boys who 
display such virtues and not merely those boys who 
happen to be bigger, stronger or more gifted than the 
otliers. 

What else can we do? In no particular order of impor- 
tance: 

1. We can stop the constant yammering at officials 
which has reached the point where our youngsters think 
an umpire or a referee is at best an imbecile and at 
worst, a thief. How can we possibly teach our children a 
respect for authority when our athletes and coaches and 
managers and even general managers keep berating 
the officials? The game begins and ends with the integ- 
rity of the i;mpire or the referee and that's the first 
thing we should teach a young athlete. 

2. Our professional athletes can stop charging top 
dollar just to poke their famous heads into a local sports 
banquet or awards night. They should instead make 
themselves much more available to the youngsters. Pro 
athletes are heroes and models to the young, which 
means ithey have a better chance to implant a few 
manners and morals into the young than the rest of us 
do. It's about time many ball players faced up to this 
duty. 

3. We've got ito expose our children to a variety of 
sports so maybe they'll find one they like and can par- 



ticipate in. To do this, we've got to make sports and 
physical fitness a much bigger part of the school cur- 
riculimi. 

4. We must give our ohildren a place in which to 
play their sports. In the great city of Boston there is 
not one indoor or outdoor track and field facihty. White 
Stadium is bolted shut about E>3 per cent of the time. 
Some of the parks and playgrounds that are open are 
slag heaps. Olher communities with plush facilities keep 
them closed most of the time. 

5. We should teach our children that talent isn't 
necessary nor is it ever enough, and we c;in use the late 
Sen. Robert Kennedy as an example. Here was a superb 
athlete, although not a particularly gifted one. What 
set him apart is the fact that whether he was hitting a 
tennis ball or shooting a rapids, he did so with the 
enormous zest that comes only when your body and 
mind and wiQ are honed and disciplined. 

If we can help our children to know this feeling, 
we'U have a sane and joyful society again. 

—Boston Herald Traveler 



MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky High School 
Athletic Association met at the K.H.S.A.A. building, 
Lexington, on Saturday morning, December 21, 1968. 
The meeting was called to order by President F>reston 
Holland at 10:15, with Board members Morton Combs, 
W. H. Crowdus, Don Davis, Ralph C. Dorsey, James T. 
Dotson, and Don R. Rawhngs; Commissioner Theo. A. 
Sanford, and Assistant Commissioner J. B. Mansfield 
present. The invocation was given by W. H. Crowdus. 

Don Davis moved, seconded by Don R. Rawlings, 
that the reading of the minutes of the October 12tih meet- 
ing be waived, since members of the Board received 
copies of these minutes. The motion was carried unani- 
mously. 

The Commissioner reported 'the results of the recent 
balloting for Board membership in Section 2 as follows: 
W. H. "Johnie" Crowdus, 31; DarreU Carter, 16. Presi- 
dent Holland welcomed Mr. Crowdus to Board member- 
ship with appropriate remarks concerning his previous 
service to the Association as a Board member. 

The Commissioner reported that the football cham- 
pionsliip playoffs continue to be successftil, with in- 
creased attendance at the first roimd, semi-final and 
final games. Financial reports had been received from 
six game niiuiagers, indicating that all expenses had 
been paid with sihares of profits having been sent to the 
schools involved. The Class AAA finals held in Louis- 
ville had set a new record in receipts and attendance. 
Ho recommended that each team in the three classes 
participating in the playoff finals be allowed the amount 
of $600 for incidental expenses. Morton Combs moved, 
seconded by James T. Dotson, that the expense allow- 
ance for each of ithe class finalists, recommended by 
the Commissioner, be approved by the Board. The 
motion w-as carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner reported that the Trophy Commit- 
tee had met at the K.H.S.A.A. office on October 19, 
1968, at which time sealed bids for the 1969 district 
and regional basketball trophies were opened. He stated 
that the Committee accepted the bids of the Hunt's 
Athletic Goods Company, Mayfield, Kentucky, for both 
district and regional trophies. The price per set of the 
district trophies was $33.00, and the price per set of the 
regional trophies was $48.40. 

Ralph C. Dorsey moved, seconded by Don Davis, that 
the next Board meeting be held in Louisville on Janu- 
ary 25, 1969. The motion was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner was directed to make lodging 
reservations in the Kentucky Lake area for the summer 



THE KENTUCKY fflGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1969 



Page Fifteen 



meeting of the Board of Corttrol, the suggested date 
being early in August. 

The Commissioner read a letter from Ath. Dir. Will 
D. Evans of .the Kentucky School for the Blind, inquiring 
concerning the possible modification of K.H.S.A.A. 
eligihiliity rules as they would apply to teams represent- 
ing the Kentucky School tor the Blind when they are 
competing against North Central Association of Schools 
for 'the Blind teams. All members of the Board were 
receptive to the rules modification suggested by Mr. 
Evans, wiith the thought that a proposal incorporating 
the rules modification requested rnigiht be submitted by 
the Board to the 1969 Delegate Assembly. 

Chairman Ralph C. Dorsey of the Personnel and 
Policy Committee reported on a meeting of his commit- 
tee held on October 12, 1968. The report did not call for 
any action by the Board at this time. 

The Commissioner read a letter from Prin. Richard 
Jett of the Morgan County High School in which it was 
requested that .the school be moved from District 2 ocf 
Region 4 to District 2 of Region 3 in the foott)all district- 
ii^ for 1969 and 1970. The reasons for the request of Mr. 
Jett were discussed by the Board. James T. Dotson 
moved, seconded by Don Etevis, that the re-districting 
request suhmitted by 'the Commissioner on behalf of the 
Morgan County Hi^ School be ai>proved. The motion 
was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner presented a request from Mr. 
Earl Duncan, AtWetic Coordinator of Jefferson County 
sdKwls, ooncerhing a possible re-districting plan foa- 
Jefferson County schools, to take effect in 1970. Tlie 
Board deferred action on the proposal until a later date. 

There was a general discuasdon concemir^ problems 
which had arisen relative to the football pl^^offs, with 
possible changes in certain regulations. President Hol- 
land appointed a committee compossed of Board mem- 
bers Don Davis and W. H. Crowdus; the Commissioner, 
and the Assistant Commissaoner to study the present 
football playoffs plan, and to make recommendations at 
a subsequent meeting of the Board concerning possible 
improvements in the plan. President Holland is an ex- 
offido member of the oommittee. 

James T. Dotson moved, seconded by Ralph C. Dor- 
sey, that all biUs of the Association for the period be- 
ginndng October 1, 1968, and endir^ November 30, 1968, 
be allawed. The motion as carried unanimously. 

There bang no further business, the meeting ad- 
journed. 



APPROVED OFFICIALS 



I 



(Contimied 
Hardin, Don G. 
Hamm, Gerald Allen 
Hancock, Norb 
Haiper, Rarxi^ H. 
Harrison, John L. 
Htna, Roy D. 
Hook, B. B. 
Hook, Don 
Hutehens, Jim 
Johnson, Harry B. 
Johnson, Jeny L. 
Jones, Frank 
List, Frank A. 
Lowe, James D. 
McCoy, Larry 
McHke, Ray S. 
Melear, Leland 
Miles, Marvin 
Montgomery, Chester 
Morgan, Richard 
MurreU, Allen L. 



from Page Two) 
Nash, Dennis B. 
Noel, John Pete 
Nuss, Albert M. 
Peirrott, Lanny L. 
Pence, Wm. Jerry 
Ramey, Herb 
Roe, Doyle Buddy 
Roesel, Joseph 
Saylors, Carlee 
Schmidt, Thomas C. 
Shartzer, Philip 
Sims, Frank D. 
Smdthson. Ri'Chard A. 
Stoess, Henry L. 
Thomas, Billy G. 
Urlage, Richard 
Vippermcua, Albert E. 
Ward, Robert 
WeUs, Glenn 
Wickham, James R. 
Williams, S. Jack 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 

REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled December 23} 

If one telephone number is ffiven for an official listed, it 
is the home phone unless otherwise de«iirnated. If two num- 
bera are ffiven, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Barlow, Douglas Wilson, Route 6, Paris, 987-4696 

Bishop. Heulyn. 340 Kenwood Road, Russell, 836-6906, 836-3631 

Bond, Howard I., Ill, 141 Grove St., Russell, 836-6826 

Bookey. Gilbert L-. Route 1, Smiths Grove. 663-2631 

Boyles, Paul, 809 Bellefonte Road, Flatwoods, 836-6497, 836-9S32 

Brewer, Larry Dale. Teresa Drive, Owingsville, 674-2467 

Brooks, Robert E., Jr., P. O. Box 2461, Pikeville, 437-6366 

Campbell. Eddie, P. O. Box 139, Leatherwood, 676-4231 

Caple, Harold E., 60S Church St.. Ludlow, 261-5384 

Clevenger, Mike. Route 2. Box 346, Ashland, 928-8803, 928-8808 

Combs, Sherman, Box 365, Pikeville College, Pikeville, 437-9191 

Compton, Ralph, P. O. Box 27, Draffin, 764-8077 

Cook, Edward A., Route 1, Box 329, Crestwood, 241-8962 

Corlis, John H., P. O. Box 114. Brooksville, 736-2421 

Comette, Benjamin Wayne. Route I, Box 646, Pikeville, 

GE 7-6394 
Grouse, Joseph Louis, Jr., 306 Maxey St., Wilmore. 868-3415 
Cummins, Earl Clinton, Route 1, Box 200, Mt. Vernon, 256-4465 
Davenport, Robert B., 199 Madison, Danville. 236-2684, 748-6180 
Dean, George Wolford, Route 1, Nicholaaville, 886-4286 
Delph. Joseph B., 109 E. Main St.. Lynch, 848-2066 
Dotson. Paul D.. Route 1, Box 870, Pikeville, 432-1843, 437-6361 
Durrum. Tony, 112 N, Ashland Ave.. Lexington 
Eddleman, Sterling Thomas, 6066 Poplar Level Road, No. 304, 

Louisville, 964-7914 
Elswick, Billy Jack, Draffin, 754-8380 
Emery. H. Richard, Orell Road, Apt. 4, Valley Station, 

447-2193 (Bus.) 
England, Paul, Oak Street, Cloverport, 788-3976 
Parish, Merlin J., 1764 Genung Drive. New Albany, Ind., 

946-0863, Brandenburg 422-2211 
Feltner, Ralph, Jr.. Park Street, Pikeville. 432-1826, 432-1828 
Ferguson, Thomas L., 215 Oney Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Fille. Michael, P. O. Box 206. Flemingsburg. 846-3189 
risk. G. Jeffrey, P. O. Box 6668, Independence. 356-7126, 

366-6559 
Foree. Kenneth I., P. O. Box 116, Bedford, 255-7212, Lexington 

266-8147 
Foster, J. W., 292 Winn Way. Lexington, 277-8636. 265-6666 
Green. Freddie M., Hickory. 247-6168 

Hardin, William. 134 Mackville Hill. Springfifeld. 836-7128 
Harris, Larry R., Cains Store, 871-3491 
Hay, Mike. Todd Halt, Box 361, Eastern Kentucky University, 

Richmond, 623-9947 
Heidel, Neal, Box 249, Asbury College, Wilmore, 868-9987 
Hill, James P., Drakesboro. 476-8272, 476-8411 
Hinkle, Melvln B.. 619 Dobbin Drive. Paris, 987-4201. 987-123S 
Horton. John L., 2126 Carriage Drive, Owensboro. 684-8316, 

684-5286 
Hoekins. James E., Route 1, Box 491, Manchester, 59B-2684, 

598-5404 < 

Howard Bruce L., Keeton Heights, West Liberty, 743-8803, 

743-3803 
Jacobs, Danny, Route 4, Owenton. 484-3873 
Jasper, Richard C 260 W. Second St., Paris. 987-4907, 987-8110 
Johnson. John L.. P. O. Box 412. Haysl, Va. 
Jones, Paul, 156 Washington St., Hamilton, Ohio, 893-4469 
Jones. Bobby, Route 1, Box 278. Manchester, 598-6163, 598-2129 
Joseph, Jerry. Route 2, Kirksey. 489-3281 
Karr, Don, 2820 Faircourt. Hopkinsville. 886-6728 
Kennedy, Wayne, 533 Woodford, Bowling Green, 842-8284, 

842-0361 
King, Allen V.. Route 1, Box 482. Henderson, 826-9647, 

826-8321 
Kupper, James Michael, 1924 Goldsmith, Apt. 36, Louisville, 

462-1782. 634-1511 
Lambert, Irv. 6110 Rural Way, Louisville, 969-4718. 582-6504 
Latkovski, Anastasius, 1236 Logan St., Louisville, 636-6720, 

587-1328 
McClintic, Bedford Rader, 2160 Nicholaaville Road, Apt. 4-D, 

Lexington, 268-9000. Ext. 2617 (Bus.) 
Marsh. J^t-n R., 118 E. Southern Ave., Covington, 291-3175, 

581-1822 I 

Maynard, Jim. 423 Victoria St., Williamson. W. Va. 
Meredith. James M., 619 Waycross, Cincinnati, Ohio, 826-7118 
Moore. William G., 601 Ferguson Road, Ashland, 324-5646, 

324-6646 
Neuman, Douglas UcGuire, 271 Kalmia, Lexington, 268-9000, 

Ext. 84650 
Nieto. William, Asbury College. Wilmore, 858-9987, 868-9987 
O'Keefe, Thomas, 9368 Gina Drive, Westchester, Ohio, 777-6897, 

663-0220 
O'Nan, Harold, Route 1, Box 87A, Robards. 621-7168 
O'Rourke Thomas J., 318 E. Pleasant, Cynthiana, 234-6805, 

234-4382 
Parker. Francis V., 208 Rosemont, Providence, 667-2224, 

965-4226 (Marion) 
Fercifield, Morris L.. 245 Redes, Lexington, 262-7879 



Page Sixteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1969 



BARDSTOWN— CLASS A, REGION 2. DISTRICT I. CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: David Floyd, John Arnold. Ritchie Mudd. Michael Wickliffe. Gary Smith. 
Henry Cecil, Dav'd Haydon. Ricky McKav, Jerry SephrooUs Second Row; Leslie Ha^-st, Regr'nald Mudd, 
Ron Molohon. Bobby Falkerson. Terry Allen. James Wickliffe. Ronnie Geoffhagren, Danny Gilkey. Buddy 
Martin. Th'rd Row: Michael Downs, Williajn Hamilton, Greg Hayden. McCawIey BaMard, Henry Green- 
well, Phil McKay. Ritchie Oakley, Gary Newton. Fourth Row: Joe Phillips, Jerry Willett, Burke Caroth- 
era, Billy Unseld. Allen Krsns. Bruce Kowe. Robert Wayne, Steve Brewer. 



Phillips, Larry, Delbarton, W. Va. 

Preece, John, Lenore High School, Lenore, W. Va. 

Radjunas, Edward, 1G44 Elliott, Ashland, 324-189S, 324-6161 

Rttliff. Gene P., 310 Fifth St., Elkhorn City, 764-7491 (Bus,) 

Redman. Carl J,. Route 4. Mt. Vernon. Ind. 

Richardson, Charles, Route 2, Dry Ridge, 823-6441 

Richardson. James E., 213 Whittier Drive, Owensboro, 684 j9B6, 

229-4193 
Ricketts, Claude O., 1606 Larchmont Ave., Louisville, 636-6636. 

634-1661 
Ross. Billy Tom, 3150 Louisa St„ Catlettsburg, 739-5301, 739-9910 
Rouse, Dwight, 602 Third St., Vanceburg, 796-3123, 796-3123 
Sparks, Bobby, Williamsburg 

Sparrow, John Allen. 468 E. Main St., Richmond, 623-1687 
Stagnolia, Eugene. 308 N, Y. Road, Cumberland, 689-2344, 

689-4626 
Stagnolia. Reecie. Jr., 160 Main St.. Lynch, 848-2884, 848-6450 
Stewart. Eddie Vincent. Langley, 286-3064 
Stewart, James R,, 2164 Sherwood, Louisville, 459-2329, ME 

7-1955 
Taylor, Gary, Meta, 432-3364, 437-6361 
Toombs. Bill. 1003 Frederica St.. Owensboro, 683-9274 
Tromblev Norman J., 160 Penmoken Park, Lexington, 278-6296, 

264-2829 
Ward, Ken W„ 107 Merewood Drive, Versailles, 878-8303, 

266-1161 
Williams, Willie H., 413 Elm St., Lexington 
Wood, F. Blake, Route 1, Box 444-CC, Elkview, W. Va- 
Yates, John Morris, Hart Hall, Box 1744, Murray State Univer- 
sity. Murray. 762-3813. 762-3811 



Points of Wisdom 

1, The coach who controls his team helps the official 
to (X)ntrol the game, 

2, The team is as goocJ as its coaoh, the game is as 
goo(3 as its official. Both actually work toward the suc- 
cess of ttie game. Therefore, both sfhould work as a 
team, 

3, A good team can look better witih g<xxi officiat- 
ing. Therefore, cooperation toward bettor officiating 
helps the good team, 

4, The official and croadh are both striving toward 
success through excellent achievement. The coach 
teadhes has players to play well. The official encourages 
them to play well through good offidating, 

5, The official can do a better job when he is not 
badgered or intimidated. The coach can do a better job 



when he is not provoked or needled. Both should work 
toward preventing this, 

6, Coaches and officials who back up each other 
need not back off from spectators or players, 

7, Coaching is a public trust; so is officiating. Both 
work for the welfare of the boy, 

8, Players look good when the coaoh and official 
look g(xxi. Bizarre incidents and arguments take atten- 
tion and credit away from the players. 

9, The coach who wants an official to favor his 
team, and the official w^ho does so, are both guilty of 
premeditated (dieating. 

10, Good officiating complements gocxl (K)aching. 
Both know and interpret rules and techracjues similarly. 



11, 
trate. 



The coach's job is to teach; the official's to arbi- 
Neither should encroach on the other's duties. 



! 



12, The coadh and official are worthy of the utmost 
in respect. However, they must earn this respect 
through their actions, 

13, The (X>ac5h and official who live by the rules are 
apt to live right on the field or floor. 

14, To get others to do what you want them to do 
you must see things through their eyes. Try f■^ win 2ui 
agreement, not an argument, 

15, The coach and official set the example; players 
follow it, 

16, Dignified coaches and officials do not resort to 
dhildi^ regressions and behavior. Their efforts are 
absorbed in helping the boys to become men, 

17, The c?oach who creates better working condi- 
tions for officials attracts better officials, 

18, The official is a judige who prevents persecution; 
he should not be the object of it. 

19, An alibi is like a crutch. It is only for the lame 
and the weak. 

20, Think big and your results will be big. 

—New Hampshire HPER News 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY. 1969 

GLASGOW— CLASS A, REGION I, DISTRICT 2, CHAMPION 



Page Seventeen 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Danny Smith. Jeff Satterly. David Trabue. Steve Gilbert. Danny Bishop. 
Mike Branstetter. Kelly St. Charles, Larry Bull. Fred Qoigley. Gary Stephens. Ricky Hewell. Jerry 
Eubank. Bill Terry. Ronnie Miller. Bruce Barrirkman. Second Row: Coach Sam Clark. Coach Butch Gil- 
bert. Harrell Murray. Doug Alexander. Bsrry Coffey. Bob Bitner. Ron Walbert. Al Albany. Larry Gilbert, 
Mike Hyde. Penn Fears. York Nunn. Greg Berry. Gary Sanderfur. Coach Bob Driver. Coach Tom 
Doiming. Third Row: Ken Hayes. David Borders. David Foster, Steve Lewis. Gary Sheroan. Tom Jones, 
Jerry England. Dennis Bull. David Payne. Mike Shirley. Billy Howell. Tim Gillenwater, Steve Brenner, 
Brent Foster. Tony Post. 



BASKETBALL QUESTIONS 

(Continued from Page One) 
back court from the floor and then replaces it on the 
back court floor. 

Ruling: Violation. The ball is considered to be in 
the front court when neither the bail nor the player 
touching it is toucdiing the back court. Thus, it was a 
violation when Al put his foot down in the back court, 
thereby returning to the back court. 

13. Play: What is a post man as it applies to the 
coverage in Rule 4-13 (b) "A closely guarded player 
anywhere in his front court (other than a post man 
attempting to pass to a teainmate(s) cutting near him) 
holds the ball for 5 se(x>nds . . ."? 

Ruling: A post man is any player holding the ball 
anywhere in his front court. Ho may be facing the bas- 
ket or he may have his back to the basket, or he may be 
facing the sideline. To be cutting near, a teammate 
must be 6 feet or less from ithe post man. The cut may 
be in front of. to the side of, behind the post man, or it 
may be in a sideline to sideline direction, or diagonally 
from sideline to the end Une or in an end line to end line 
direction. That is, a cut may be in any direction. If the 
count has been started and a cut is near the post (6 feet 
or less), wiUi the post man making a bona fide attempt 
to pass to the cutter, the count terminates. When the 
cutter gets beyond 6 feet or he stops near the post, a 
new ooujit wUl start if the post man continues to be 
closely guarded. 

14. Play: At the expiration of playing time for the: 
(a) second quarter; or (b) the firet overtime, the score 
is tied. Al was fouled before the ball became dead and 
is, therefore, entitled to a free throw. Team B, with 
charged time-outs remaining, immediately requests 
one. When the time-out period has expired and before 
the ball has been put in play, the coach of team B re- 
quests a time-out for the purpose of "preventing or 
rectifying a correctable error." 

Ruling: In (a) the time-out request of coach B is 
granted In (b), it is denied. The specific coverage 
which pK.hibits successive charged timeouts after the 
expiration of playing time for the fourth quarter or 
second half, or for any overtime period, takes prece- 
dence over the general coverage which permits the 
granting of a coach's request for a time-out to prevent 
or rectify an error. 

15. Play: Team A has had four charged time-outs. 
Fourth quarter playing time expires with the score 
tied. Team B, fouled before the ball became dead, is 
entitled to a free throw. T^am A requests a charged 
time-out, w"hich is granted. After the expiration of the 



charged time-out, team A immediately requests a 
se(X)nd time-out, indicating it acknowledges the grant- 
ing of the reijuest would carry with it the assessment 
of a technical foul for the excess time-out. 

Ruling: The retjuest for the successive time-out is 
denied and it may not be granted even at the expense 
of a technical foul. 

16. Play: Al prepares for a throw-in. Teammates 
A2, A3 and A4 take a file (tandem) position in front of 
Al. A2 is approximately 3 feet from Al. Bl desires an 
alternate position between either A2 and A3, or A3 and 
A4. 

Ruling: Bl is not granted the alternate position. 
A2, A3 and A4 are in a legal position since a file or 
tandem formation may be set as close to the boundary 
line as the offensive team desires without the defen- 
sive team being privileged to have alternate positions. 
The Mmifation provided by 7-6 (c) applies only to forma- 
tions which are parallel and near to the throw-in bound- 
ary. 

17. Play: Al prepares to throw-in. A2, A3 and A4 
take positions in front of Al: (a) approximately 3 feet; 
or (b) more than 6 feet from the boundary. A2, A3 anti 
A4 are in a flank forrrijation, shoulder to shoulder, and 
parallel to the boundary. Bl desires a position between 
A2 and A3. 

Ruling: Bl is entitied to the position between A2 
and A3 in (a) but not in (b). The coverage 7-6 (c) pro- 
vides, "Teammates shall not occupy adjacent positions 
near the boundary if an opponent desires one of the 
positions." "Near" is interpreted to mean 6 feet or 
less. Thus, in (b), because the A players, in adjacent 
positions, are more than 6 feet from the boundary, the 
limitation is not applicable. 

18. Play: Team A unjustifiably delays start of half 
for 2V2 minutes. How many free throws should be 
awarded? 

Ruling: One. In extreme circumstances, the official 
has the authority to call a technical foul for each time 
a team refuses to follow any order by an official. 



Basketball Case Book Revisions 

The listed situations refer to plays in the 1968-69 
edition of the Basketball Case Book. Each is identified 
by number. 

(Page 12) 16. Play— Replace the last word in the sixth 
line of the ruling ("front") with the word "mid." The 
corrected sentence will then read. "If Al stops before 
leaving the mid-court, a new count would start." 

(Page 22) 112B Play— Team A's starting lineup is 



Page Eightcon 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1969 



DAYTON— CLASS A. REGION 3. CHAMPION 



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(Left to Right) Front Row: Mgr. Dave Mullins, Mgr. Doug Campbell. Mgr. Tom Williams, Mgr. Grel 
Tamer. Mgr. Frank Cox. Second Row: Fred Wilburn. Allen Williams. Chuck Lightfoot. Larry Wiseman, 
Rick Buchanan. Rick lies, Ron Zepf. Mike Ackerson. Mike Schoonover. Bob Fitch. Sam Wilborn. Pat 
Doyen. Clarence White. Third Row: Bobby Eddy, Wayne Fryman. Dell Brickler, Mike Gallagher. Tom Rath, 
Mike Sharp, Pat Dougherty. Rocky Wiefering. Tom Fowee. Dave lies. Mark Myers. .M'ke Berkemeier. Ron 
Farris. Fourth Row: Drue Ferguson. Murrell Heatin, Bill Buschard, Fred Eddy, Joe Fowee. Carroll Wes- 
cott. Jeff Perkins. Bill Frommell. Mike Kennedy. Larry Lang. Ernie Schweinzger. Jim Stewart. Carlis 
Turner. Fifth Row: C'oach Ray King. Asa't Coach Terry Lightfoot. Dave Fox. Joe Walton, Rick Reynolds, 
Dale Thompson. Chester Campbell. Toti Williams, Bill Richardson, Larry Lightfoot, Steve Carnes, Ass't 
Coach Ted Williams, Asa't Coach Tom fjood. 



designated to the scorers at least 3 minutes before the 
time the game is scheduled to start. One minute prior 
to 'the scheduled time of starting the game, Team A's 
coaoh makes three personal changes in the designated 
starting lineup. Ruling— Each scorebook change is a 
separate act. Team A is assessed three technical fouls. 
One technical foul for each change. A throw-in from the 
center of the court by the offended team %vill follow the 
free throiv and the clock will start when the ball is 
touched on the court. (3-2) 

(Page 41) 215A Play— During an overtime period, 
time-outs are requested: (a) successively by Team A; 
or (b), alternately by both teams; or (c). simultane- 
ously by both teams while the ball is dead. Ruling — 
The requests are granted in (a), (b) and (c) because 
they are requested during an overtime period. Succes- 
sive time-outs are permitted until after expiration of the 
playing time, for the 4th quarter, second half, or any 
overtime period. In (c) each team is charged with a 
time-out. (5-11) 



Cheerleading Guicielines 

1. Don't use diecrs which ridicule the opposing 
team. 

2. Don't cheer or clap when opponent has been 
injured. 

3. Don't tolerate boos, whistles, or cat calls when 
the opposing team is shooting fouls. 

4. Try tactfully to discourage any discourtesy on the 
part of your crowd. 

5. Don't start a cheer or stunt when the other 
team's cheerleaders are cheering. 

6. Do all you can to discourage clapping when 
opponents foul or an opponent is removed from the 
game because of fouls. 

7. Cheerleaders should always cheer. 

8. Practice your routines until you know them so 
thoroughly that you rarely make an error. 

9. The crowd will reflec-t your sportsmanship. Don't 
.show temper, discourtesy, or lack of interest. 



10. Try to please your crowd. If they want a certain 
cheer, unless there are obvious reasons why it shouldn't 
be used, do the cheer for them. 

11. Be alert. Always knosv what your next chi.«r 
will be. 

12. Learn the rules and terms of the game. The 
game is the primary consideration, not the cheerlead- 
ing. You can look very foolish when you call for an 
inappropriate cheer. 

13. Use defmite motions that will tell your group 
when to start and when to say each word of the cheer. 

14. Keep your cheers peppy, but remember that it 
is intended that the words should be understandable as 
they are yelled. Don't go too fast. 

13. Use wide sweeping motions that are easy to 
follow from a distance. 

16. Keep hands open and arms straight as much as 
possible. 

17. Leave the floor when "time in" is called, even 
though you have not finished your cheer, so that the 
game may be resumed. 

18. Do not monopolize the cheering time. Give the 
other cheerleaders a chance to be heard. 

19. Make frequent use of chants rather than relying 
on yells alone. 

20. "Riwling out" the crowd rarely gets them to 
cheer louder. 

21. Welcome visiting cheerleaders and make them 
feel at home. Plan to exchange cheers and be sure that 
your students are courteous to them when they are 
exchanging cheei-s. 

22. Have short cheers to use during time-outs and 
save the showy longer cheers for half or quarter time. 

23. Work over your routines until the timing is per- 
fect and all of the movements are the same. An excel- 
lent way to check on this is to do the cheer standing in 
a circle watching each other (for practice). 

24. Be sure to announce your cheers loudly and 
clearly. In pep meetings when you are teaching a new 
cheer, be sure you know it well, tlien tell the students 
loudly and clearly how it goes. You might then have 
(hem repeat it with you or you might have the cheer- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1969 



Page Nineteen 



McKELL— CLASS A. REGION 4. DISTRICT 2. CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Keith Cooper, Stanley Roberts, Keith Gammon, Gary Tinsley, Bob 
Thompson, Vael Brown, Steve Dowdy, Terry Hall. Mike Bradley. Second Row : Hobert Burke. Bob Bryson, 
Eddie Bentley, Don Cooper, Bob Kennard, Tom Mnllins, Larry Tarr, Roger Marshall. Third Row: Paul 
Lybrooiu. Danny Traylor, Ralph Cales, Harold Wooten, Grei Gibbs, Don Gallett, Mark Stone, Stan Tim- 
berlake, Tom Wright^ Jerry Collier. 



leaders oheer it to show how the words lit with the 
motions. 

25. If you ni'ake a mistake when cheering go on 
anyway. Don't shriek, act embarrassed, or run off 
giggling. This only maikes your mistake more obvious. 

26. Don't try to yeU cheers at a game that have not 
been introduced to the student body at a pep meeting 
unless you have cheer sheets or books so they can fol- 
low you easily. 

27. Try to look as though you enjoyed your work. 

28. Keep out of the line of vision of the spectators 
when you are not cheering. 

29. Do not sit down. In football season use a blanket 
upon which to imeel out of the crowd's way, but sitting 
doesn't look peppy. 

30. Don't lead a cheer when the two teams are in 
action. 

31. The time for "fight" cheers is when the score is 
close or your team is behind, not when your team has a 
large lead. 

32. AU cheerleaders should start motions at the 
same time. Poor timing spoils the effectiveness of your 
cheer. 

33. Particularly at foottiall games, spread out. Your 
fans are widely spread so increase your spreading. 

34. Avoid arguments and fighting with the Sipecta- 
tors. 

— M^aphone 



The Emphasis in Basketball 

By Dr. Phil Fox 

A well-known basketball player ihas said this about 
having played the game of basketball: "E^verything I 
have I gained from being fortunate enough to play high 
school and college basketball. My education, my secu- 
rity, my work and my family have their roots in the fact 
that I played the game of 'dribble and shoot.' It gave 



me the strength and determination to save my life dur- 
ing World War n. Without my basketball experience, I 
would never have lived through the war. All sports, 
especially basketball, are excellent background and 
preparation for any youngster." 

Truly, this player has said basketball gives a boy 
confidence in himself, teaches him the value of coopera- 
tion and teamwork, gives him an incentive to take care 
of his body, and emphasizes the value of self-discipline. 

Properly conducted under aWe and understanding 
administrators, coaches and officials, basketball makes 
a significant permanent contribution to our youngsters. 
However, let us not forget that if basketball is not prop- 
erly conducted it can do lasting harm to all involved. If 
it is not properly administered, if the coach is a poor 
teacher and sets a bad example, and if the officijJ is 
incompetent and lacks integrity, our young people will 
receive undesirable outcomes from their participation 
in the sport. 

The administrator who demands winning ait any cost 
and places the position of the coach in jeopardy on a 
win and loss record is not contributing to what basket- 
ball should be giving our young people. Further, the 
administrator who fails in his responsibility to carefully 
supervise and control the competition in basketball is 
contributing to a breakdown in the values to be received 
from the game. To insure that the desirable values in 
basketball are exposed to the players, the administrator 
must extend every effort to ensure that the basketball 
experience provides a safe, educational experience lor 
our youngsters. 

A coadi who teaches his boys to violate the rules and 
to ignore the spirit of the rules is contributing littie to 
the educational values of basketball. If the ooach vio- 



Page Twenty 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1969 



In Stock for 

Immediate Delivery The SpOft ShOD 



First-afd Supplies 

A.B.A. Cold Tablets 

Adhesive Tape 

Alcohol 

Am Caps 

Anagestic Liniment 

Ankle Brace 

Ankle Weights 

Ankle Wraps 

Aspirin 

Athletic Liniment 

Athletic Soap 

Ath-0-Gesic 

Atomic Balm 

Atomic Rub-Down 

Band Aid 

Batter's Rosin 

Bike Tape 

Black Magic 

Body Powder 

Butterfly Tablets 

Carbonate Stick 

Cotton 

Cotton Applicators 

Cramergesic 

Dextrotabs 

Dial-A-Tab 

Dry Smelling Salt 

Elastic Wraps 

Elbow Pads 

Felt 

P'irm Crip 



First Aid Kits 

Foam Rubber 

Foot Ointment 

Foot Powder 

Foot Solution 

Fung-o-spray 

Gauze 

Glare Guard 

Instant Ice 

Iso-Quin 

J & J Cream 

J & J Tape 

Kleen Ball 

Knee Braces 

Knee Pads 

Tape 

Tape Remover 

Tongue Depressors 

Towels 

Training Kits 

Tuf-Skin 

Vitamins 

Football Equipment 

Ankle Braces 
Ankle Weights 
Arm Pads 
Bleachers 

Blocking Drumming 
Center Bars 
Chain Sets 
Charging Sled 
Chin Straps 



pboM 302 fi31-;fl43 




:06-110 North Race Street 
Glasgow, Kentucky 



Write for 196S-69 school catalogue 



lates the educational objectives of his school in his 
coaching, it he violates athletic association codes of 
ethics, and if he violates board of education rules he is 
not givin? his players the proper education or respect 
for established codes, rules and regulations. 

The coach who is dominated by the point of view that 
the final score is the only big reason for the basketball 
contest is a liability to the game. The coach who openly 
and publicly shows his displeasure and dislike for the 
decisions of the officials through undesirable bench con- 
duct and tmwarranted newspaper, radio and TV releases 
is teaching his players and their classmates disrespect 
for recognized authority and e-slablished governing i-ules. 

To utilize fully the potential in basketball for the 
development of desirable values, the coach should 
organize and conduct his basketball program in accord- 
ance with the following principles: (1) Regard basket- 
b;ill as an integral part of the total educational pro- 
gram; (21 Protect and foster the physical welfare and 
safety of the participants; (31 Conduct all games and 
practice sessions in accordance with the letter and the 
spirit of the rules and regulations of the governing ath- 
letic association; (4) Set a desirable personal pattern 
of behavior and conduct that will influence aU the com- 
munity to follow, parents as well as students. 

The official who cannot be consistent, who lacks 



coura.ge, and who fails to administer the rules properly 
is contributing very Little to the game of basketball. An 
official who is not friendly, not fast, not factual, not fair 
and not fit, is undermining and destroying the values 
to be derived from the game. The official who considers 
each coach as a personal opponent and as a rival, who 
plays the role of "God," and who uses a profane and 
boisterous approach is an evil influence not only on the 
players but to the game itself. 

The adminisfrator, the coach and the official who are 
interested in the future of basketball, and more impor- 
tant, in the future of our youngsters, must cx)mbine 
their efforts as one team to eliminate and rectify the 
evils that have crept into the game of basketball. The 
time has come not to de-emphasize or to ehminate the 
game, but to re-emphasize those values in basketball 
that have made it the great game that it is. The values 
to be found in the code of fair play and good sportsman- 
ship must be continued, or, if nocessaiy, re-established 
as the basic objectives of the game of basketball wher- 
ever and whrnever played. 

The challenge of upgrading the game of basketball 
should be accepted by evei-y administrator, coach and 
official. 

— Arizona Hi-Lites 



The KINGDEN Company 



LIFE DEPARTMENT 

Scholastic, Athletic, 

Life, Accident ■ Health, 

Special Risks. 



121-123 Lafayette Ave. 
P. O. Box 7100 
Lexington, Kentuclty 40502 
Telephone 254-4095 



January 10, 1969 



Dear Reader: 

For a good many years you have seen our ads in this space. You 
may have decided that they are repetitious, lacking in imagin- 
ation, or even inept. 

You may be right. But consider our dilemma. Our product is 
intangible until it is needed - then it becomes very tangible 
indeed - in terms of prompt service and hard cash to pay the 
expenses of an injury. 

Intangibles cannot be readily shown by pictures or charts in 
ads. Our interest in and understanding of your problems are 
real. Our years of experience in providing the best coverage 
and claim service at a realistic price are also real. The fact 
that the cheapest is rarely the best or most serviceable has 
been proven over and over. 

But, how do you express these facts? We try in two ways: 

1. By the use of our simple ads. 

2. By trying to keep abreast of current trends affecting 
your insurance needs and offering service and insurance 
coverage to meet these needs. 

The Cooperative Football Plan for Kentucky High Schools is one 
development we feel proves our awareness of your needs. 

If you are not now using our services shouldn't you find out 
about them? 



Sincerely , 

THE KINGDEN COMPANY 




iD^i 




E. McCreary, Manage^ 
Life Department 

JEM/ka 



K.H.S.A.A. TOURNAMENT DIRECTORS 

District and Regional Tournament Directors can get all of their supplies 
and needs to run a tournament from Hunt's. We have the merchandise 
listed below in stock for immediate shipment. Call or write us your needs. 

BASKETBALLS 

(Jet the feel of a basketball same as will be used in the State Tournament in 
Louisville, and in your District or Regional Tournament. We have all 
brands. 

ADMISSION TICKETS 

Complete stock of admission tickets, 2,000 tickets to the roll numbered con- 
secutively. Printed ADULT, STUDENT, and ADMIT ONE. $1.50 per roll 
of 2,000. 

TROPHIES AND AWARDS 

We can take care of your Sportsmanship trophies, individual charms for 
All-Star teams, etc. Our stock is complete and we can engrave in our store 
and ship to you at once. 

ACCESSORIES 

Nets, scorebooks, first-aid supplies, whistles, stopwatches, timers' horns, 
powdered rosin, bath towels, shoe laces, colored top sweat socks, carry-all 
bags. All of this merchandise i.i stock for at once delivery. 

BANKS AND GOALS 

We have a complete stock of fan-shaped steel, fan-shaped and rectangular 
glass backboards complete with goals and nets in stock for at once delivery. 
A phone call will get them off to you at once. 



FAIR-PLAY ELECTRIC BASKETBALL SCOREBOARDS 

We have IN STOCK the Fair Play Tick-A-Way Scoreboard ready for imme- 
diate shipment. A call will get one to your gymnasium before tournament 
time. 

Turn all of your needs over to us. We will be glad to handle them for you. 
ROY BOYD, JIM MITCHELL, WADE BURLESON or C. A. BYRN, JR. 
are always ready to assist you in every way possible. 

If you want the BEST QUALITY and the BEST SERVICE contact HUNT'S 

HUNTS ATHLETIC GOODS CO., INC. 

CH 7-1941 — PHONES — CH 7-1942 

MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 
PHONE 459-6366 LOUISVILLE, KY. 



gy Wc ShipOhe DaV^Vou B uV^ |i 








Hiqh School AthMe 

CLASS AAA STATE CHAMPION TRINITY 




^rl^-»75'^^?;7, ?i,ji;44 ^J'2^^2; 



.^iat^ld^Jtl^f^ ■ ^^ .*«jlb<«*J~k(llt>4*^ 






(Left to Right) Front Row: Tommy Gorman, Kit Shauglinessy, Frank Ronnau, Ronnie 
Hall, John LaVelle, Mike Hahn, Dale Erwin, Steve Resch, Joe Kirchner, Rick Hancock, Dan 
Danaher, Barry Shaughnessy, Dan Wheat, Kent Schadt, Ken Barr. Second Row: Jim Mudd, 
Dennis Glore, Bob Shaughnessy, Frank Mudd, Bob Diersen, Ronnie Wolford, Craig Kissel, 
Joe Hipwell, Tom Rittle, George Ab«l, Dennis Jewell, Mark Stiebling, Steve Jecker, Joe 
Pierce, Kevin Roy, Pat Bleemel, Charles Johnson, Dennis Scully, Rich Hill, Dan Woock. 
Third Row: John Washbish, Mark HoUknect, Kep Nunn, Bob Silliman, Russ Read, Fred Per- 
kins, Bill Drane, Dwain Heckman, Roger Smith, Ken Ern«t, Pat Meehan, Don Hennessy, 
Mark Scott, Brad Jenkins, David Hartlage, Alan Hennessey, Mike Dickman. Fourth Row: 
Mike Page, Phil Stuecker, Mark Sheehan, Steve Sutton. 



Trinity 39-Waggener 
Trinity 39-Central 
Trinity SS-DeSales 6 
Trinity 2&-Flaget 
Trinity 47-Harrison County 6 



Trinity 12-St. Xavier 19 
Trinity 19-Bishop David 
Trinity 40-duPont Manual 7 
TriniJy 39-Jeffersonville 7 
Trinity 14-Male 



PLAYOFF 



Trinity 29-Seneca 18 



Official Organ of the 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

February, 1969 



Letter From the Commissioner 

To the District Tournament Manager: 

WUl you please refer to your K.H.S.A.A. booklet 
whioh gives rules and regulations governing basketball 
tournaments. You should familiarize yourself with these 
rules, found on pages 30-38. Your special attention is 
caUed to the second paragraph of Tournament Rule 
VI-A-3, relative to the enrollment of your district 
coaches in the Kentucky High School Coaches Asso- 
ciation. 

The forms for your various reports are self-explana- 
tory. The report of games should be mailed to the man- 
ager of the regional tournament not later than Monday, 
March 10. Send your financial reixjrt, your checked 
eligibility lists, and the second copy of the report of 
games to the Commissioner as soon after the tourna- 
ment as possible. For your convenience, the following 
check lost is given: 

1. Invite member schools to your tournament AT 
ONCE, reminding each school to send each other mem- 
ber school in the district a COMPLETE preliminary 
list of players on or before February 1, and to send you 
THREE copies of a final lisit one week prior to the dis- 
trict tournament. See Rule VIII. 

2. Announce the time of drawings in your letter. 
See Rule IX. 

3. At your meeting, conduct the drawings and select 
the officials. The state plan for division of tournament 
receipts is recommended. If any other plan is used, a 
majority vote of the participating schools must be 
obtained. 

4. Your attention is called especially to the la-t two 
paragraphs of Tournament Rule V-A, and to Tourna- 
ment Rule V-C. 

5 The following procedure has been established by 
the Board of Control in the selection of tournament 
officials under authority given in Tournament Rule 
V-A: (a) Each school represented at the meeting may 
submit the names of one or more officials. There shall 
be a minimum of eight names on the list of officials to 
be voted on. NO NAME SHALL BE MARKED OFF 
THE LIST, (b) Bach sdhool representative shall rank 
eight officials in the order of his preference, the first 
dhoice being assigned eight points, the second seven 
points, etc. (c) The tournament manager shall commu- 
nicate at once with the hig'hest ranking official or offi- 
cials in the order of their rank. If the official who is 
selected can not be reached within one hoiu: of the time 
of his selection, or if he is not available, the tournament 
manager shall attempt to empxloy the next official or 
officials on the list in the order of their selection. If the 
tournament manager attempts to contact the official by 
telephone and there is no answer, 'the manager should 
check with the operator for a possible change in the 
official's number, (d) If two officials are tied on podnts, 
the highest ranking official sihall be determined by flip- 
ping a coin, (e) If none of the officials on the Hsit is 
available, the tournament manager shall have the sole 
responsibiUty of securing an official or officials for the 
tournament. 

6. Tournament Rule XV says: "The Board of Con- 
itrol is authorized to select, standardize, and purchase 
trophies for all district and regional tournaments and 
the cost of these trophies shall be borne by the respec- 
tive districts and regions." The Board has contracted 
with The Hunt's Athletic Goods Company, ilVIayfield, 
Kentucky, to supply all of the official K.H.S.A.A. dis- 
trict first place and second place basketball trophies 
for the 1969 (tournaments, each trophy complete with 
the Association seal and engraving. Your trophies wiU 
be .shipped to you prior to Mardh 1. 

7. It is the responsibility of the tournament man- 
ager to secure adequate rwUce protection. 

8. THE BOARD OF CONTROL HAS RULED THAT 



NOT MORE THAN TWELVE PLAYERS MAY BE IN 
UNIFORM FOR ANY ONE TOURNAMENT GAME, 
AND THAT OTHER SQUAD MEMBERS SHALL NOT 
BE ALLOWED TO PARTICIPATE IN WARM-UP EX- 
ERCISES, THIS BEING IMPUED IN TOURNAIVLENT 
RULE XI. 

9. Please ask your officials to designate the goals 
prior to the warm-up time for each game. 

10. You will receive three copies of a final eligibility 
list from each school. Have one of these checked by the 
coach of each competing team, before his team plays, 
for the twelve players he will use in each game. Use 
only one list for checking players on each team since the 
other two copies may be needed by the regional and 
state tournament managers. Send the Commissioner all 
of these checked copies with your other reports. Send 
the two unchecked copies of eligibility hsts of the win- 
ner and runner-up to the manager of your regional 
tournament, along with one copy of your report of 
games, not later than March 10. 

11. It has been ruled that the 2:00 o'clock mentioned 
in Tournament Rule IV-B may be considered Eastern 
Standard time or 1:00 P.M. CENTRAL STANDARD 
TIME. This information concerning the starting time 
of the regional meeting should be given to your winner 
and runner-up. 

12. Send Secretary Oiir of the Kentucky Coaches 
Association the list of district coaches to be enrolled in 
Iiis organization and remittcmce for these, and send the 
Commissioner the various reports mentioned above as 
soon as possible. 

13. Tournament Rule VI-A-3 provides that the dis- 
trict representative to ithe annual meeting may be 
allowed for expenses an amount not to exceed $50.00. 
Since this is a maximum and not necessarily a fixed 
amount, the delegate should be asked to submit an 
estimate of the cost of his lodging, transportation, and 
meals because of his representing the district at the 
annual meeting. 

Sincerely yours, 

Ted Sanford, Commissinoer 

K.H.S.A.A. 

Attention! 

The Board of Control now has the authority to set the 
fees for district tournament officials. The following 
regulations for 1969 have been set by the Board: "The 
officials shall receive a fee of $25.00 per game and a 
transportation allowance of 10c per mile for all neces- 
sary travel. In the event it is necessary for the official 
to remain overnight at the tournament site, he shall be 
paid an additional $20.00 per day for lodging and 
meals." 



Attention, Principals! 

With the baseball season not far away, the following 
information should be timely: 

1. Since the registration of baseball officials is now 
a requirement, the intent of this rule would be that only 
K.H.S.A.A. registered umpires may be used in baseball 
games. 

2. The requirement under By-Law 30 that ajll coach- 
es and assistant coaclies shall be members of school 
faculties, with a work assignment of at least three class 
periods, applies to baseball. No person who does not 
comply with this rule should occupy a ooacher's box 
during a baseball game. 

3. Rules clinics for imipires will be held at numer- 
ous sites in the state on March 23. The sites wiU be an- 
nounced in the March issue of the ATHLETE. Princi- 
pals are urged to request their baseball coaches to at- 
tend these meetings. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ o/ the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXXI— NO. 7 



FEBRUARY. 1969 



SI. 00 Per Year 



Basketball Questions 

EDITOR'S NOTE: These interpretations of the rules 
of Ihe National Basketball Committee of the United 
Sta'es and Canada do not set aside nor modify any rule. 
The rulings are made by the National Federation of 
Siate High School Athletic Associations in response to 
situations presented. 

Clilford B. Fagan, Committee Secretary 

19. Play: Al c&mplete.s his dribbie. He then places 
(sets) the ball on the floor. Afler simullaneously remov- 
in.s; bo'h hands from the ball so that it is out of his 
control, he regrasps the ball and picks it up from the 
floor. 

Ruling: Violalion. Double dribble. The ball is 
awarded to team B at the nearest out of bounds spot. 

20. Play: A field goal attempt lodges in basket 
support. The ball is declared dead and the teams pre- 
pare to jump at the near fr€« throw line with Al and Bl 
being the jumpers. A charged time-out is requested and 
granted. During the charged time-out. S6 attempts to 
be substituted for Al, who had intended to be a 
jumper. 

Ri'ling: Legal. The substitution is accepted. S6 hat; 
legally entered the game and any person in the game 
may participate in the jump. There is no requirement 
that the person. Al, who originally was preparing to 
jump must actually be in that position when the ball is 
to become alive. 

21. Play: Following a jump ball in the center cir- 
cle, the tapped ball is caught in A's front court by A2. 
He dr.bbles toward his basket and then reverses direc- 
tion and continues so that the ball is dribbled into the 
back court. 

Ruling: Legal. 

22. Play: A player, who has been holding the ball, 
places the ball on Ihe floor and gives the "T" signal to 
the official in requesting a time-out. 

Ruling: On the ba^^is of rules coverage, the player 
is required to make his request for a tmie-out only 
when Ihe ball is dead or in control of a player of his 
team. The definition provides that a player is in control 
when he is holding a live ball or dribbling it. Since Al 
IS neither holding 'he ball nor dribbling it at the time 
he a~ks for a time-out, the iniles do not authorize the 
officials to grant a time-out in the situation presented. 

23. Play: Al strikes Bl. Bl almost simultaneously 
draws back his arm and clenches his fist as if to strike 
Al but does not swing at him. 

Ruling: Al is disqualified. Flagrant personal foul 
committed by Al for which Bl will be awarded two free 
throw attempts. Bl may be assessed a technical foul for 
baiting an opponent or unsportsmanlike action. How- 
ever, it is a matter of judgment on the official's part 
as to whether Bl was assuming a protective position or 
an aggressive one. As rela ed in the circumstance 
above, unless there were additional factors, it is quite 
likely that the action of Bl would be ignored since it is 
olear that the whole situation was provoked by Al. If 
JBl is charged with a technical foul, any member of 
team A could attempt the free th-^v a'ter which the 
ball would be put in play by a jump between any two 
opponents m the center circle. 



24. Play: What are the standards which the referee 
must use in determining whether a player will be per- 
mitted to wear certain equipment? 

Ruling: There are four criteria which determine 
the legality of player equipment. Fir--t, any equipment 
wnich, in tiie judgment of the official, is dangerous to 
other players may not 'oc worn. In this respect, elbow, 
hajid, finger, wrist or arm guard, cast or brace made of 
sole leather, plaster, metal or any other hard sub 
stance snail always be declared illegal "even though 
covered with soft padding." Thus, the rule does not 
permit that ihis provision be set aside. The prohibition 
of the use of hard substance material does not apply 
to the upper arm, shoulder, thigh or lower leg if the 
hard material is appropriately padded so that in the 
judgment of the referee it Is not hazardous to other 
players. It will be noted that the listing of equipment 
which is always illtgal is not inclusive. It cannot list 
every item which is not permitted. The generalization is 
required since the official's judgment is necessary. No 
list could include eveiy item that some player might 
desire to wear. The general category, in addition to 
those listed, prohibits "any other hard substance" from 
being legal. The second criterion provides that any 
equipment is le.gal without respect to whether or not it 
is hard if the equipment is dangerous to other players. 
Equipment which could cut or cause an opponent to 
have an abrasion is always illegal and, therefore, is 
prohibited. The third standard provides that "any 
equipment which is unnatural and designed to increase 
the player's height or reach, or to gain an advantage, 
shall not be used." The official is given no leeway here 
and judgment is not required. The fourth criterion pro- 
vides that equipment used must be appropriate for bas- 
ketball. In tliis sense, football face masks and hehnels 
are not acceptable. The traditional basketball knee 
brace may be worn if it is properly covered. A protector 
for a broken nose, even though made of hard material, 
is permissible if it does not e.x'tend so as to endanger 
other players, if it is not sharp and if it has no cutting 
edges. Eyeglass protectors are considered appropriate 
equipment for basketball proxided they meet the quali- 
fications for legal equipment, including the fourtii cri- 
terion. 

25. Play: Al. whose team is behind in score, is 
holaing the ball without opposition in the mid-court 
area. 

Ruling: After approximately 15 seconds, the trailing 
official should warn team A for lack of action. Either 
the referee or the umpire is authorized to issue this 
warning. In virtually all systems of officiating, the 
trailing official is responsible for the 15-second count 
and, therefore, is the logical official to give the warning. 

2G. Play: Al sets a screen behind stationary Bl 
so close that when Bl moves backward, Bl contacts Al 
before Bl takes a normal step. The contact is not 
rough. 

Ruling: Al has committed a foul for blocking be- 
cause he was in an illegal position (too close to Bl). The 
severity of the contact is not a factor. In contact ensues 
as a result of a screener being in an illegal position, tlie 
foul is on the screener. A screen behind an opponent, to 
(Continued on t'age Eight) 



Pa^e Two 



THE KENTUCKY fflGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1969 



FEBRUARY, 1969 



VOL. XXXI— NO. 7 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

Hi?h School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington. Ky. 40501 

Second class postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 

BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Preston Holland (1965-60), Muri&y 

Vice-President Ralph C. Dorsey (1966-70), Horse Cave 

Directors — W. H. Crowdus (1968-71), Franklin; Morton Combs 
(1968-72), Carr Creek: Don Davis (1967-71), Independence; 
James T. Dotson (1968-72), Johns Creek: Don R. Rawlings 
(1965-69), Danville: Foster J. Sanders (1966-70). Louisville. 
Subscription Rate $1.00 per Year 

zfiom the Comtnissionei s CJffice 



1969 District Tournament Sites 



1. Hickman County 34. 

2. Paiiucah Tilghman35. 

3. Symsonia 36. 

4. Murray Univ. 37. 

5. Trigg County 38. 

6. Webster County 39. 

7. West Hopkins 40. 

8. Hopkinsville 41. 

9. Daviess County 42. 

10. Muhlenberg Cent. 43. 

11. Breckinri(3ge Co. 44. 

12. Edmonson County 45. 



13. Russellville 



46. 



14. Franklin-Simpson 47. 

15. Glasgow 48. 

16. Tompkinsville 49. 

17. Elizabethtown 50. 

18. Hart County 51. 

19. Washington Co. 52. 

20. Adair County 53. 

21. Valley 54. 

22. Shawnee 55. 

23. Iroquois 56. 

25. duPont Manual 57. 

26. Eastern 58. 

27. Durrett '^f). 

29. Taylorsville 60. 

30. Shelby County 61. 

31. Oldham County 62. 

32. Williamstown 63. 

33. Lloyd 64. 



Holmes 

Newport Catholic 

Campbell County 

Bourbon County 

Bracken County 

Mason County 

Montgomery Co. 

Frankfort 

Harrodsburg 

Bryan Station 

Model Laboratory 

Garrard County 

Monticello 

Somerset 

London 

Oneida Institute 

Knox Central 

Bell County 

Evarts 

Jenkins 

Hazard 

Jackson 

Wolfe County 

Paintsville 

Wayland 

Millard 

Phelps 

Univ. Breckinridge 

Carter 

Russell 

Paul G. Blazer 



1969 Regional Tournament Sites 

(1) Murray State University, (2) Hop- 
kinsville High School, (3) Owensboro Sports- 
center, (4) Western Kentucky University, 
(5) Hart County High School, (6) Freedom 
Hall, (7) Freedom Hall, (8) Henry County 
High, School, (9) Holmes High School, (10) 
Clark County High School, (11) U. K. Coli- 
seum, (12) Danville High School, (13) Mid- 
dlesboro High School, (14) Hazard High 
School, (15) Joihtoson Central High School, 
(16) Morehead State University. 



State Swimming Meets 

The 1969 Class AAA Stale High School Swimming 
Mset will be heW at the Plantation Swim Club pool, 
Louisville, on February 21-22, the Class AA meet at the 
University of Kentucky pool, Lexington, on March 21-22. 
The meet for girls will be heW on Friday at each loca- 
tion, beginning at 1:00 P.M.; the meet for boys on 
Satur(3ay, beginning at 9:00 A.M. 

Class AAA will include those high schools with an 
enrollment ol 900 or more (grades 10-12), and Qass AA 
will include those s(^hools with an enrollment of less 
than 900. AlNmale or all-female schools with an enroll- 
ment of 450 or more are placed in Class AAA. General 
regulations concerning the meets appear in the 
K.H.S.A.A. booklet. AU rules appearing in the 1969 
scholastic section of the N.C.A.A. Swimming Guide will 
be followed unless there is some difference between 
these regulations and those adopted by the Board of 
Control. In such an event, K.H.S.A.A. rules will prevail. 

Only those swimmers who qualify for the finals will 
be given expense allowances for transportation, lodging, 
arid meals. 

Schools sponsoring boys' teams in swimming are: 
Atherton, Beechw(X>d, Boone County, Bi-yan Station, 
Campbell County, Dixie Heights, Fern Creek, Fort Knox, 
Franklin County, Harrison County, Henry Clay, High- 
lands, Hopkinsville, Kentucky Military Institute, Lafay- 
ette, Louisville Country Day, Model, Murray, Newport, 
Newport Catholic, Paducah TUghman, Paul G. Blazer, 
St. Xavier, Senecia, Shelbyviile, Tateis Creek, Trinity, 
Waggoner, Westport. 

Schools sponsoring girls' teams are: Beeohwood, 
Bryan Station, Campbell County, Dixie Heights, Fern 
Creek, Fort Kno.x, Henry Clay, Highlands, Hopkinsville, 
Lafayette, Model, Murray, Newport, Notre Dame, Pa- 
ducah Tilgihman, Paul G. Blazer, Sacred Heart, Sayre, 
Seneca, ShelbyviUe, Tates Creek, Villa Madonna, Wag- 
goner. Westport. 



Track Assignments 

Track regulations adopted by tihe Board of Control 
provide that the state shall be divided into classes and 
regions by the Commissioner Who wUl assign the 
schools to the regional sites. For the first time, there 
are two (dasses in Girls' Track. The 1969 assignments 
are as follows: 

Track — Class AA Girls 

Paducah Region — Ballard Memorial. Calloway County, 
Christian County, Hopkinsville, Lone Oak, Lyon County, Mur- 
ray, North Marshall, Paducah Til&hman, Reidland, St. Mary, 
South Marshall. 

Henderson Region — Calhoun, Crittenden County. Daviess 
County, Henderson, Henderson County, Holy Name, Madison- 
ville-North Hopkins, Owensboro, Providence, West Hopkins. 

Glasgow Region — Adair County, Austin Tracy, Bowling 
Green, Greensburg, Greenville. Hiseville, Metcalfe County, Park 
City. Russellville. Temple Hill, Tompkinsville. 

Fort Knox Region — Bardstown, Bloomfield. Breckinridge 
County, Cub Run, Flaherty. Fort Knox, Meade County, North 
Hardin, Oldham County, Shelby County. West Hardin. 

Boone County Region — Bellevue. Boone County, Campbell 
County, Carroll County, Henry County, Pendleton, Silver Grove, 
Simon Kenton, Trimble County. 

Lexington Region — Bryan Station, Frankfort, Franklin 
County, Harrison County, Harrodsburg. Henry Clay, Jessamine 
County, Lafayette, Lexington Catholic. Lincoln. Sayre, Scott 
County, Shelbyviile, Tates Creek, Woodford C^ounty. 

Berea Region — Boyle County. Burgin, Burnside, Bush, Corbin, 
Hazard. London, Madison Central, Middlesboro, Model, Oneida, 
Somerset. 

Morehead Region — Boyd County, Elkhorn City, Fleming 
County, Johnson Central. Louisa. Mason County. Montgomery 
County, Paintsville, Paul G. Blazer, Prichard, Rowan County, 
University Breckinridge. 

Track-Class AAA Girls 

Butler Region — Butler, Central, Loretto, ]>>uisville Male, 
Shawnee. 

Atherton Region — Durrett, Fairdale, Holy Rosary, Jefferson, 
town, Thomas Jefferson. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1939 



Page Three 



Iroquois Region — Angela Merici. Doss. Iroquois. Valley, 
Western. 

Eastern Region — Eastern. Fern Creek, Mercy Academy, 
Ursuline. Westport. 

Trade-Class A Boys 

Paducah Region — Ballard Memorial, Calhoun. Crittenden 
County. Fort Campbell, Fulton, Hickman County, Lyon County, 
Murray, Providence, Reidland, St. Mary, South Marshall, Trigg 
County. 

Glasgow Region — Austin Tracy. Cavema. Cumberland Coun- 
ty, Gamaliel, Glasgow, Hiseville, Hughes-Kirk, Livermore, 
Metcalfe County. North Warren. Park City, Russellville, 
Temple Hill, Tompkinsville. 

Fort Knox Region — Bardstown, Bloomfield. Campbellsville, 
Caneyville, Clarkson, Cub Run, Flaherty. Kentucky Military 
Institute, Kentucky School for the Blind, Lebanon, Louisville 
Country Day. Portland Christian. St. Thomas. West Hardin. 

Boone County Region — Bellevue, Bishop Brossart. Carroll 
County. Dayton. Eminence. Grant County. Henry County, 
Nicholas County, Pendleton, Trimble County. 

Lexington Region — Anderson. Frankfort. Geo'getown, Har- 
rodsburg. Lexington Catholic. Lincoln. Mercer County. Millers- 
burg Military Institute. Paris. Sayre. Shelbyville. 

Berea Region — Berea. Burgin. Burnside. Estill County. 
Garrard County. Hazard. Kentucky School for the Deaf. Model. 
Montgomery County, Monticello. Mt. Sterling. Shopville. Stan- 
ford. 

Barbourville Region — Bush. Corbin. Fleming-Neon. Harlan. 
Hazel Green, Jenkins, London, Pineville, Riverside Christian, 
Williamsburg. 

Morehead Region — Bath County. Elkhorn City. Hazel Green 
Academy. Johns Creek. Lewis County. Maysville. Menifee 
County. Morgan County. Paintsville. Pikeville. Prichard. Race- 
land. Virgie. Wurtland. 

Track-Class AA Boys 

Paducah Region — Caldwell County. Calloway County. Chris- 
tian County. Hopkinsville. Lone Oak. Mayfield. North Marshall. 
Paducah Tilghman. 

Henderson Region — Daviess County. Henderson. Henderson 
County. Madisonville-North Hopkins. Owensboro. Owensboro 
Catholic. Union County. Webster County. 

Glasgow Region — Adair County. Bowling Green. Franklin- 
Simpson, Greensburg. LaRue County. Taylor County, Todd Cen- 
tral. Wayne County. 

Fort Knox Region — Breckinridge County. East Hardin. 
Elizabethtown, Fort Knox. Meade County. North Hardin. Old 
Kentucky Home. Oldham County. Shelby County. Shopville. 

Boone County Region — Boone County. Camnbell County. 
Covington Catholic. Dixie Heights. Highlands, Holmes, Lloyd, 
Newport. Newport Catholic. Simon Kenton. 

Lexington Region— Bourbon County. Bryan Station, Franklin 
County. George Rogers Clark. Harrison County. Henry Clay. 
Jessamine County. Lafayette. Scott County. Tates Creek. Wash- 
ington County. Woodford County. 

Berea Region — Bell County. Boyle County. Clay County. 
Cumberland. Danville, James A. Cawood. Knox Central. Mc- 
Creary County. Madison Central. M. C. Napier. Middlesboro, 
Somerset, Whitesburg. 

Morehead Region — Belfry. Boyd County, Fleming County, 
Johnson Central, Louisa, McKell. Mason County. Paul G. 
Blazer. Prestonsburg. Rowan County. Russell. 

Track-Class AAA Boys 

Butler Region — Butler. Central. duPont Manual. Flaget. 
Louisville Male. Shawnee. 

Atherton Region — Atherton. DeSales. Durrett. Jefferson- 
town. St. Xavier. Southern. Thomas Jefferson. 

Valley Region — Bishop David. Doss, Fairdale. Iroquois. 
Pleasure Ridge Park, Valley, Western. 

Eastern Region — Eastern. Fern Creek. Seneca. Trinity. 
Waggener, Westport. 



Approved and Certified Officials 

Since the list of Approved and Certified officials ap- 
peared in the January issue of the ATHLETE, three 
additional officials ihave qualified for the higher ratings. 
They are: Paul Boyles and Howard E. Gardner, Certi- 
fied; Ronald R. Dixon, Approved. 



Correction 

In the list of schools appearing in the January issue 
of the ATHLETE, the Covington Latin High School was 
listed incorrectly in BasketbaH District 35. The school 
is in Basketball District 34. 



Minutes of Board Meeting 

The Board of Con'rol of the Kcn'tueky High School 
Athletic Association met at the Kentucky Hotel, Louis- 
ville, on Saturday morning, January 25, 1969. The meet- 
ing was called to order by President Preston Holland at 
8:30, with all Board members, Conmiissioner Theo. A. 
SanJord, and Assistant Commissioner J. B. Mansfield 
present. The mvooation was given by Foster J. Sanders. 

Ralph C. Dorsey moved, seconded by W. H. Crow- 
d'U3, that the reading of the minutes of the December 
21st meeting be waived since the members of the Board 
received copies of tliese minutes. The motion was car- 
ried unanimously. 

Ralph C. Dorsey moved, seconded by Foster J. 
Saiiders. that tlie following regulations concerning the 
fee? for district and regional basketball tournament 
officials be adopted: The district tournament official 
i.hall receive a fee of $25.00 per game, the regional 
tournament official a fee of $30.00 per game. The trans- 
porla.ion allow'ance shall be 10 cents per mile for all 
necessary travel. In the event that it is necessary for 
the official to remain overnight at the tournament site, 
he shall be paid an additional $20.00 per day for lodging 
and meals. The motion was carried unanimously. 

Chairmcm Don Davis of the Fooball Playoffs Com- 
mittee made a report for his Committee. He stated that 
a questionnaire concerning a po3sibIe change in the 
fooibaU regulations relative to determining the sites of 
semi-final games in the playoffs would be sent by the 
Committee to the principals of K.H.S.A.A. member 
schools involved, and that the Committee at the March 
meeting of the Board will make recommendations con- 
cerning plans for breaking Dickinson System ties and 
breaking ties in game scores. 

There was a discussion of new proposals to be sub- 
mitted by the Board at the forthcoming 1969 Delegate 
Assembly. Dan R. Rawlings moved, seconded by James 
T. Dolson, that the following proposals be submitted to 
the 1969 Delegate Assembly: 

"Proposal I — Add the following paragraph to By-Law 
36: 'The Kentucky School for the Blind, in competition 
with siinilar schools in other states, may compete under 
tile eligibility rules of the North Central Association of 
Schools for the Blind.' 

" Proposal II — Amend By-Law 7-2 to read as follows: 
'Any student using insulting lan^guage to another player 
or to an ofiicial in any intersoholastic contest, or who 
has been ruled out of such a contest because of foul 
laciics, shall be disqualified from athletic competition 
un;il reinstated by the Commissioner. The name of tiie 
player shall be reported immediiately to the Commis- 
sioner by the principal of the school which that player 
attends. Wiien an official disqualifies a player, he shall 
report the disqualification to this principal or his repre- 
sentative. If the Commissioner finds upon investigation 
that the offense was sufficiently serious, the offender 
shall be permanently disqualified.' 

"Proposal III— Amend By-Law 1-7^ to read as fol- 
lows: 'If any school plays an ineligible player, when the 
facts were available and could have been known upon 
such inve^stigation as a principf J is expected to make in 
the case of each of his players, that school shall be 
suspended from the Association or otheiwise penal- 
ized.' 

"Proposal IV — In the last sentence of By-Law 8, omit 
'Softball' and 'bowling,' adding 'gymnastics,' 'wres- 
tling,' and 'rifle marksmanship.' 

"Proposal V — Amend the second paragraph of By- 
Law 29-3 to read as follows: 'The head coach in football, 
basketball and baseball shall attend one clinic in the 
sport involved.' 

"Proposal VI— To the last clause of By-Law 29-4-b, 

(Continued on Page Four) 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1969 



The Flying Dutchman 

The year is 1949 and a kid, crippled by polio, has 
just won a wheelbarrow race in a playground track 
meet running on his hands; a week later the same lad 
pitched and won a softbaU game as he sat on the pitch- 
er's mound because his paralzyed legs made it impos- 
sible for him to stand. That's the day the Flying Dutch- 
man projects were bom. The thought occurred that, if 
little Bobby Kirchdorfer could overcome such a great 
physical handicap to engage in sports, he could inspire 
others to do likewise — so it was that Bobby Kircihdorfer 
became Kentucky's first Game Guy of the year twenty 
years ago and hundreds of boys and girls since have 
foDowed this example and gone on to hold high posi- 
tions in business, law, education and recreation. 

In 1950 Oral Miller of Ashland, a blind boy, was our 
Game Guy. The last time I heard from Oral he was 
practicing law in Washington, D. C. This program 
interested Kentuckians and from every section of our 
state coadhes, preachers, teachers and jusit about 
eveiy other field got behind the Dutchman's movement 
to recognize achievements of the physically handi- 
capped. Not all boys nominated could be the Game Guy 
of the year but every youngster became a winner of 
the lionheart award as soon as he joined the program. 

The following letter from Dick Coop emphasizes just 
how much this Kentucky High School Athletic Associa- 
tion's program impressed him: 
"Dear Mr. Vettiner: 

"I am not certain if you will remember me or not, 
but I am certain you do remember my father, Paul 
Coop of Campbellsville. If you don't remember me, let 
me refresli your memory a bit. You sent me a Flying 
Dutchman Lionheart Award Lapel Pin when I was a 
sophomore at Campbellsville High School. Although I 
never on the "Game Guy of the Year Award," I shall 
always remember the effect that receiving the lapel 
pin had on my self concept. I have talked to other boys 
who received them, and they, too, echoed my feelings. 

"While coaching at Glasgow High School in 1964-65, 
I recommended David Fant for the Game Guy Award, 
and when he received his lapel pin he was one of the 
happiest youngsters I have ever seen. 

"I am presently an assistant professor of educational 
psychology at the University of North Carolina at 
Qiapel HiU. I left Glasgow to finish my doctorate at 
Indiana University and after receiving my degree I 
came to UNC. I am wondering if you would send me 
any information you have on iiie Game Guy program 
you have going in Kentucky, so I could propose an 
adoption of a similar program here in North Carolina 
to Simon TerreD, the executive secretary of the North 
Carolina High School Athletic Association. I have not 
talked to him about this program yet because I wanted 
to have some material to present to him when I pro- 
pose this. I also thought that we might even use the 
same name you have used, if you dio not mind. I per- 
sonally feel that this program Should spread to aU 
states in the Union. Any material you have on the past 
history of tlie winners of the Game Guy Award — their 
physical handicaps, etc-^would help. 

"Let me dose by saying that the more I study the 
psychology of the human organism, the more I under- 
stand the value of your Game Guy Award, both in 
terms of motivation and self concept principles. 

Sincerely yours, 
Raahard H. Coop 
Assistant Professor of 
Educational Psychology" 



Dick Coop's letter makes the year of 1969 for this 
Dutchman. Every piece of information relative to the 
Flying Dutchman's projects has been sent to Dick. 
Along with this material goes a Com Cob Pipe of 
Honor Award for the unselfish service he is renderir^. 

Readers of this column may like to see the complete 
picture painted in the K.H.S.A.A. sports program dur- 
ing the 1949-69 period. 

Besides the Game Guy Program for the physically 
handicapped there are the Abou Ben Adhem awards 
wihioh are sent to schools and community organizations 
which promote friendship between communities and 
hospitality at high school games. Earl Driskell, Jr., 
one of Kentucky's outstamding basketball officials, 
makes a recommendation for an Abou Ben Adhem 
award as follows: 

"Atherton High School should have an Abou Ben 
Adhem citation because its coach. Gene Minton, re- 
flected credit on his school by sportsmanlike accept- 
ance of a close decision the officials made in his Sen- 
eca game, which meant defeat for his team." Earl says 
that Gene Minton's gentlemanly actions caused good 
relations between the spectators and players. May his 
tribe increase! Earl closes by saying, "Thanks for a 
job you have done well for twenty-seven years as Dean 
of Kenrtucky's officials." Many such letters keep coming 
to the Dutchman and my cup is, indeed, running over. 

Another of the Dutchman's projects, which he closes 
out during this 1968-1969 sports season, is his School 
for Basketball Officials held annually in Lexington, 
while stiU another axe those annual clinic tours which 
have now become history for this guy. In all, your 
interpreter conducted 409 basketball clinics for Commis- 
sioner Ted Sanford. The Isist Flying Dutchman project 
being closed out in May is this column bearing the 
name more Kentuckians know him by than the one he 
was bom with in Schnitzelburg — The Flying Dutchmai.. 

There you are, Kentuckians — a lifetime of projects 
aimed at happiness for others and good will for every- 
body. Nobody was ever criticized in my columns — only 
praised. We always looked for the good in people and 
wrote about this. And, do you know who is happiest of 
all because of all these Flying Dutchma-n projects? Me. 



BOARD MINUTES 

(Continued from Page Three) 

add 'or six baseball;' and to the last sentence of By- 
Law 29-4-c add 'and/or twelve first team high school 
baseball games.' 

"Proposal VII— In Article DC, Section 1, of the Con- 
stitution, change 'March 20' to 'March 1.' " 

The motion concerning the proposals was carried 
unanimously. 

Don Davis moved, seconded by James T. Dotson, 
that Basketball Rule I be amended by adding the fol- 
lowing: "Special permission may be given by the Com- 
missioner for the final district or regional tournament 
game to be played on Saturday afternoon." The motion 
was carried unanimously. 

James T. Dotson moved, seconded by Don Davis, 
that the Coanmissioner be authorized to set up for 
1969-70 a program for the registration and training of 
Wrestling officials. The motion was carried unani- 
mously. 

Don R. Rawllngs moved, seconded by James T. 
Etotson, that aH biUs of the Association for the period 
beginning December 1, 1968, and ending December 31, 
1968, be allowed. The motion was carried imanimously. 

There being no further business, the meeting ad- 
journed. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ArHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1939 



Page Fivs 



Football Officials' Ratings On Sportsmanship Of 
K. H. S. A. A. Member Schools - 1968 



SCHOOL 



Anderson 47 

Atherton 24 

Bardstown 38 

Bath County 27 

Beechwood __ _ 21 

Belfry 34 

Bell County 21 

Bellevue 31 

Berea Community 24 

Bishop David 35 

Boone County 34 

Bourbon County 33 

Bowling Green 37 

Boyd County 53 

Boyle County 35 

Breckinridge County 29 

Bryan Station 44 

Burgin 12 

Butler 32 

Butler County 30 

Caldwell County 25 

Campbell County 24 

Campbellsville 20 

Carroll County 22 

Catlettsburg 52 

Caverna 25 

Central 21 

Christian County 22 

Corbin 28 

Covington Catholic 16 

Crittenden County 21 

Cumberland 31 

Cumberland County 27 

Danville 46 

Daviess County 23 

Dayton 36 

DeSales 34 

Dixie Heights 33 

Doss 7 

duPont Manual 31 

Durrett 35 

Eastern 26 

Elizabethtown 41 

Elkhorn City 32 

Eminence 18 

Evarts 32 

Fairdale 23 

Fern Creek 28 

Flaget 28 

Fleming County 39 

Fleming Neon 34 

Fort Knox 28 

Fort Campbell 29 

Frankfort 44 

Franklin County 27 

Franklin-Simpson 17 

Fulton 28 

Fulton County 2 

Gamaliel 8 

Garrard County 28 

George Rogers Clark 32 

Georgetown 23 

Glasgow 50 

Greensburg 24 

Harlan 33 

Harrison County 48 

Harrodsburg 35 

Hazard 28 

Hazel Green 32 

Henderson 18 

Henderson County 27 

Henry Clay 35 

Henry County 21 

Highlands 45 

Hiseville 18 

Holmes 14 

Hopkinsville 36 

Iroquois 35 

James A. Cawood 21 

Jeffersontown 24 

Jenkins 30 



COACH 
G F 



OTHER SCHOOL 
OFFICIALS 
P E G F P 



CROWD 
G F 



TEAM 
G F 



7 
14 
11 

9 

8 

6 

9 
11 

9 
11 

7 
14 
12 
10 
10 

8 
14 

7 
14 

9 

5 
14 
16 
16 

2 
10 
16 

3 

6 
10 

6 

8 
10 
12 
10 

8 
14 

9 

7 
16 

9 
12 

8 

4 
12 I 

1 I 
18 
12 
14 

7 

4 
10 

3 
19 
15 

9 

4 

9 

3 

9 
11 
10 

2 

6 

7 
12 
10 

3 



4 

9 

7 
11 
13 

2 

8 

6 
13 

9 
14 

5 



1 

1 

3 

2 



2 

2 



4 

2 

2 

3 

1 

1 

1 

3 



1 

4 

2 



4 

3 

2 

1 

1 I 

4 

1 

1 

1 







2 

6 

1 

4 

4 



2 

1 





3 

2 

1 

2 

2 

1 

2 

1 

1 

1 

4 

5 

1 





1 

1 

3 

6 

2 

2 



1 

1 

6 



2 

1 

1 







6 



1 

5 

2 

1 I 




1 



2 


3 
3 







1 


3 
1 
3 



1 
1 
2 
12 

4 
1 

1 


1 





1 

4 


4 
2 
4 
1 
8 


1 


4 
5 
1 

2 


1 

3 


1 
2 

5 
1 
3 



7 
I 

4 I 

5 I 
I 
I 



47 
27 
42 
33 
25 
38 
19 
35 
30 
36 
36 
40 
38 
59 
37 
30 
44 
14 
31 
31 
28 
36 
33 
22 
54 
31 
29 
24 
33 
22 
24 
35 
28 
48 
28 
36 
31 
39 
6 
34 I 
38 I 
28 
42 
36 
17 
34 
30 
30 
35 
43 
37 
30 
31 i 
47 I 

30 I 
26 I 
28 I 

6 I 

9 I 
30 
39 
30 
51 
30 
36 
47 
37 
30 
28 
21 
31 
34 
21 
48 
19 
20 
37 I 
37 I 
29 
25 I 

31 I 



8 

12 

10 
5 
3 
3 

11 
7 
7 

11 
7 
7 
8 
5 
9 
9 

14 
4 

16 

10 
3 
7 
7 

17 
1 
5 

13 
3 
2 

11 
3 
7 
9 

11 
9 
8 

16 
7 




1 


1 
1 
1 

2 
2 

1 
3 


1 

1 
1 
I 

1 



1 







1 

4 







1 

2 

1 

3 





I 

I 

2 I 



\\ 



15 I 

6 
13 

5 









1 



1 





1 





2 
2 

1 

1 





1 
2 

1 
1 



3 




1 


4 

2 
3 
2 


3 



1 
1 


1 




1 








2 

4 









1 1 

1 I 4 

1 





43 


10 




1 


44 


11 





25 


14 


1 





21 


16 


3 


38 


13 


1 





37 


14 


1 


29 


7 




1 


29 


6 


2 


20 


8 







21 


8 





32 


6 


4 


2 


34 


8 


2 


21 


10 







22 


10 





30 


12 








32 


10 





29 


7 


3 


1 


32 


7 





31 


17 


3 





33 


18 





31 


12 








40 


3 





33 


14 


2 





32 


15 


2 


33 


14 


2 


1 


33 


17 





50 


12 


1 


1 


50 


12 


2 


32 


11 


2 





37 


8 


1 


25 


12 


2 


1 


24 


11 


5 


43 


15 








45 


13 





11 


3 


2 


5 


11 


5 


3 


32 


17 





1 


35 


15 





33 


8 








30 


11 





26 


7 








25 


5 





28 


14 


1 





30 


10 


2 


25 


14 


2 


1 


28 


14 





18 


19 


2 





22 


15 


2 


33 


16 


5 


1 


34 


15 


6 


26 


10 








24 


12 





27 


13 


1 


1 


18 


15 


8 


23 


3 





1 


20 


6 


1 


27 


6 


2 


2 


28 


6 


1 


21 


12 


2 


4 


19 


11 


4 


23 


3 


1 





22 


6 





32 


10 


1 





32 


8 


1 


28 


9 





1 


28 


9 





46 


12 


1 


1 


42 


13 


4 


30 


7 


2 


1 


31 


8 


1 


34 


9 


1 


1 


30 


11 


4 


33 


18 


2 





33 


20 





30 


15 


1 





34 


12 





6 


8 


■ 





6 


8 





29 


16 


2 


2 


29 


18 


2 


33 


12 


1 





35 


9 


1 


26 


11 


1 


4 


27 


15 





39 


10 








42 


7 





31 


7 


1 





26 


10 


3 


12 


14 


3 


7 


16 


11 


4 


30 


3 


2 


1 


28 


3 


4 1 


25 


17 


2 


3 


26 


20 


1 


28 


14 


1 





28 


12 


2 


31 


15 


2 


3 


33 


12 


5 


40 


7 








39 


9 





32 


7 








31 


7 


1 


30 


9 





1 


30 


10 


1 


30 


2 


1 





28 


5 


1 


39 


25 


3 





42 


23 


1 


37 


11 


3 





33 


14 


2 


23 


8 





1 


24 


5 


1 


25 


4 


1 


3 


27 


6 





3 


7 


1 





2 


6 


3 


9 


3 


2 





8 


1 


3 


28 


10 








29 


8 





37 


9 








37 


9 





21 


14 


3 


2 


22 


11 


4 


41 


10 


3 





40 


12 


1 1 


27 


8 








25 


9 


1 1 


32 


8 








32 


6 


2 


44 


13 


4 





42 


16 


3 


33 


13 


1 





31 


12 


3 


29 


7 


3 





28 


6 


2 


26 


6 








25 


7 





20 


7 





2 


19 


9 


1 


28 


9 





1 


23 


13 


1 


30 


12 


2 


2 


31 


12 


2 


18 


13 


1 





19 


12 


1 


42 


14 


1 


1 


48 


10 





19 


1 








19 


1 





20 


14 


1 





25 


8 


2 


33 


9 








34 


8 


1 


30 


21 


1 


1 


31 


21 


1 


25 


11 


4 





25 


9 


6 


25 


11 


4 





24 


14 


2 


28 


7 


1 





30 


6 






Page Sx 

Jessamine County 30 

Johns Creek 27 

Kentucky Miliiary Institute 20 

Kentucky School for Deaf 22 

Knox Central 28 

Ijafayette 34 

LaBue County 38 

Lebanon 24 

Leslie County 26 

Lily 21 

Lloyd 31 

London , . 36 

Louisa 32 

Louisville Country Day 21 

Louisville Male 33 

Ludlow 20 

Lynch 41 

Lynn Camp 34 

McKell 23 

M. C. Napier 23 

Madison 25 

Madison Central 38 

Madison ville-North Hopkins 24 

Mayfield 35 

Maysville 22 

Meade County 30 

Mercer County 35 

Metcalfe County 27 

Middlesboro 34 

Millersbuig Military Institute 23 

Montgomery County 23 

Morgan County 25 

Mt. Sterling ^ 39 

Mt. Vernon 15 

Mullins 4 

Murray 26 

Newport 28 

Newport Catholic 15 

Nicholas County 30 

North Hardin 29 

North Marshall 23 

North Warren 25 

Ohio County 23 

Old Kentucky Home 34 

Oldham County 37 

Owen County 23 

Owensboro 33 

Owensboro Catholic 15 

Paducah Tilghman 40 

Paintsville 30 

Paris ^ 34 

Park City 12 

Paul G. Blazer 27 

Pikeville 33 

Pineville 43 

Pleasure Ridge Park 27 

Prestonsburg 33 

Raceland 26 

Rowan County 30 

Russell 48 

Russellville 26 

St. Xavier 34 

Sayre 12 

Scott County 34 

Seneca _, 24 

Shawnee 23 

Shelby County 20 

Shelbyville 31 

Shepherdsville 22 

Simon Kenton 34 

Somerset 32 

Southern 1 38 

Stanford 32 

Tates Creek 21 

Temple Hill 17 

Thomas Jefferson 27 

Tompkinsville 34 

Trigg County 27 

Trinity 33 

Union County 33 

Valley 34 

Virgie 17 

Waggener 34 

Warren County 19 

Washington County 28 

Western 26 

Westport 22 

Wheelwright 35 

Whitesburg 25 

Whitley County 32 

Williamsburg 31 

Woodford County 37 

Wurtland 37 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1969 



8 


1 


2 


35 


B 





10 


5 


6 


42 


2 


1 


8 





4 


20 


10 





1 1 








20 


2 





1 7 


1 


4 


34 


5 


1 


1 9 


4 


3 


39 


10 


1 


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2 





39 


3 


3 


9 


2 


2 


31 


5 





1 6 








26 


6 





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3 


2 


23 


5 


4 


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1 





31 


8 





5 


1 





36 


6 





10 








36 


6 





2 








19 


4 





9 


2 





33 


10 





17 


2 


2 


32 


8 


1 


1 11 


1 


1 


41 


12 


1 


1 e 








33 


7 





18 


5 


5 


34 


34 


1 


5 








25 


3 





9 


5 


3 


38 


2 


2 


11 





1 


40 


10 





14 


5 


2 


29 


15 


1 


2 








36 


1 





8 


1 





22 


6 





8 


1 


2 


37 


2 


1 


6 


1 





35 


5 


2 


6 








29 


4 





1 6 


1 





32 


7 


2 


13 


3 





32 


6 





12 


4 


3 


30 


8 


1 


10 








27 


8 





11 


1 


1 


42 


10 





1 2 





1 


18 








11 


1 





14 


2 





2 








28 








13 


1 


1 


32 


11 





9 





1 


15 


9 


1 


5 


1 


2 


30 


5 





10 








33 


6 





1 6 





1 


29 


1 





6 








20 


7 





9 


3 


2 


31 


6 





14 


2 





36 


12 


1 


11 


1 





36 


11 


2 


14 


6 





24 


15 


3 


9 








32 


9 


1 


3 


5 


6 


21 


5 


1 


6 


1 


2 


46 


2 





7 


1 





34 


2 


1 


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35 


7 








4 





16 








1 7 


4 


3 


36 


5 





12 


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43 


4 





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39 


9 





15 








32 


9 


1 


3 








32 


3 





8 


4 


9 


37 


9 


1 


5 








31 


3 





6 


1 


4 


52 


7 





6 


1 


2 


30 


5 





14 








33 


14 





2 








13 


1 





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2 


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10 


1 


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33 


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1 


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4 


1 


29 


8 


1 


9 


1 





28 


11 


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26 


7 


1 


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32 


8 


3 


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3 


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36 


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33 


15 


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9 


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20 


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8 


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3 


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11 


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1 


33 


4 





I 4 








28 


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13 


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36 


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36 


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27 


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31 


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3 


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31 


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44 


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1 30 

2 33 
1 17 
1 19 



27 
34 
34 
22 
23 
22 
30 
38 
21 
19 
27 
23 
41 
29 
23 
21 
38 
35 
29 
35 
25 
31 
33 
27 
3D 
31 
30 
27 
37 
11 
4 
26 
27 
14 
29 
29 
30 
22 
28 
30 
33 
22 
33 
21 
43 
29 
34 
15 
31 
35 
37 
29 
29 
26 
26 
41 
3D 
34 
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31 
32 
23 
27 
22 
23 
31 
30 
34 
28 
31 
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33 
20 
32 
24 
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31 
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1 9 


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IS 


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15 








18 


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2a 


IB 


4 


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1 





39 


7 





11 


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24 


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26 


6 





6 


2 


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36 


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31 


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42 


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23 


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31 


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27 


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32 


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29 


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22 


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23 


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15 


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26 


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28 


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22 


B 





9 








25 


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33 


16 





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27 


14 


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24 


IB 


4 


1 9 








32 


9 


1 


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17 


B 


3 


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43 


4 





1 5 


3 


1 


26 


6 


B 


1 8 


1 





35 


8 





1 D 


1 





15 





1 


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31 


ID 





1 10 


2 





30 


IS 


2 


1 10 


D 


1 


38 


ID 





1 11 


2 





24 


16 


2 


1 7 








30 


6 





1 16 


4 


1 


29 


16 


2 


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23 


11 


1 


1 15 


3 





33 


17 


4 


1 4 


1 


D 


27 


7 


1 


1 14 








3B 


12 


1 


1 1 








13 


1 





1 16 


1 





30 


IS 


3 


1 19 


2 





29 


22 


2 


1 19 


2 


2 


22 


21 


2 


1 12 








25 


14 





1 15 


2 


2 


24 


14 


3 


1 11 


1 





23 


8 


2 


1 11 


1 





32 


11 





1 10 


1 


3 


30 


ID 


1 


1 IB 








32 


18 





1 7 


1 


2 


31 


4 


2 


i 7 


1 





28 


10 


1 


1 5 








16 


5 


1 


12 


3 


2 


23 


16 


3 


1 4 


1 





33 


3 


1 


3 


1 





26 


5 





20 








31 


17 


3 


6 








33 


6 


2 


19 


1 





31 


22 





6 


7 


1 


19 


13 


2 


1 11 








3D 


12 





13 


2 


1 


21 


15 


4 


1 10 


1 





25 


7 


2 


1 16 


2 





30 


18 





1 17 





2 


26 


16 


6 


1 6 








29 


7 


2 


1 7 


3 





21 


6 


4 


1 8 








29 


5 


2 


1 3 


2 


1 


29 


4 


4 


1 10 


1 


2 


40 


8 





1 12 


6 


2 


39 


13 


4 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRU.'IRY, 1969 



Page. Seven 



Schools' Ratings On 
Football Officials 

The following ratings were received on football 
officials registered with the K.H.S.A.A. during 1968- 
1969. The numbers following each name represent re- 
spectively the number of Excellent, Good, Fair, and 
Poor ratings given to the official. 

Adams, Calvin K., 0-2-0-0; Adams, Michael Lynn, 
1-1-0-0; Ahrens, James, 1-0-0-0; Albright, James R., 
5-5-2-0; Allen, Arthur, 0-7-1-0; Allender, Raymond L., 
0-3-0-1; Allison, Roy, 7^-0-0; Anders, Raleigh A., 
3-15-3-0; Anderson, Glenn S., Jr., 3-3-0-1; Anderson, John 
Grant, 5-3-0-1; Ashworth, Paul, 1-0-0-1; Ayers, Edward 
L., 4^2-0; 

Baiisden, Lc-o E., Jr., 0-1-1-0; Bartels, John, 0-8-1-2; 
B:ites. Bob, 0-1-1-0; Battisti, Edward A., 0-0-0-1; Behe- 
ler. Donald S., 2-11-1-1; Bell, Qarence T., 3-2-1-0; Ben- 
nett. Howard. 4-.3-0-0; Bennett, John S., 4-3-1-0; Benzing- 
er. Joseph. Jr., 1-4-0-0; Hero, James, 2-2-2-1; Blackburn, 
Adrian, 2-12-0-3; Blair, Ray. 0-2-(M); Blake. Jesse L., 
2-5-4-0; Blanton, Homer. 1^-0-0; Bocook. Earl. 3-1-0-0; 
Boemker, Bob. 2-8-2-1; Bordy. Phil, 2-7-2-1; BosweU, 
Martin, 4-6^-0; Bowman, Earl G., "Dick," 2-3-1-0; 
Boylos. Jerry. 4-4-0-0; Bradford. Robert L., 2-6-1-0; 
Brashear. Loy Ray, 4-12-3-0; Brauch. Charles J., 14-2-1; 
Brizendine, Vic, 9-6-1-0; Brock, Alben. 3-6-0-5; 

Brotzge. Maurice J.. 3-6-1-0; Brown. Bill. 4-10-3-0; 
Brown. Herman G.. 4-5-1-0; Brown. J. W., "Scoop." 
0-1-0-0; BuUock. Ted, 2-9-1-1; Bunnell. John, 0-1-0-0; 
Burgess. Marvin C, 1-1-0-1; Burgess, Oley, Sr., 2-1-0-0; 
Burke, David D., 0-2-3-1; Burke, Harry R., 12-9-0-1; 
Burkhart, James G., 0-2-1-0; Burnett, Gerald, "Duke," 
3-2-1-0; Burton, James, 7-5-2-0; 

Cain. Paul D.. 7-3-1-1; Calitri, Don, 2-1-0-2; Canaday, 
Jacy Glenn. 3-5-0-0; Canady. Ray B.. 6-3-0-0; Canter, 
John 6-8-1-0; Carlberg. John H., 7-9-0-0; Carlberg, Ralph 
C, 3-10-0-0; Carlson, David A., 6-2-0-1; Carr, Billy WU- 
son. 1-3-0-1; Carrico, John. 2-0-0-0; Cecil, A. Morris, 
8-7-4-0; Cecil, Donnie, 0-2-0-0; Cisco. Robert N., 1-5-1-1; 
Clark, John E.. 1-3-1-0; Clark, Lou. 1-5-3-0; Clark, Owen 
B.. 6-10-1-0; Clark, Robert L.. 6-6-1-0; Clemmons. Sam. 
2-10-1-0; Qemons. Glen C. 0-2-0-0; Clusky. Joe, 2-0-0-0; 
Callins, Ronald K., 4-9-1-0; Cook, Richard, 6-8-2-0; 
Caoper, Norris E., 0-5-0-0; Comwell, James, 3-5-0-0; 
Cowan, R. L., Sr., 3-6-3-0; Craft, Albert B., 4-7-0-0; 
Craft, BiU, 2-54-3: Crider, Ray, 4-3-0-2; Cullen, Charles 
"Bud," 34-1-1; Gulp. Willard E. .11-3-0-1; Cumutte, 
James R., 0-1-0-0; Current, Ellis Ray, 10-2-0-0; 

Dallman, James W., 2-0-0-0; Daniels, Robert M., 
1-2-0-0; Davis. Charlie. 0-0-1-0; Davis, Curt, 5-12-0-1; 
Davis, Ralph C, 1-1-0-0; Deaton, Daniel E., 3-4-1-0; 
Dennedy, Bob, 1-0-0-1; Dent, Donald, 4-11-2-1; Denton, 
Charles, 4-7-1-2; Denton, William J., 4-7-1-2; Detenber, 
Gene, 7-12-1-0; Dial, Charles, 0-1-0-0; Dial, Jack W., 
1-1-0-0; Dixie, C. P., 3-1-1-0; Dorsey, James, 3-0-0-0; 
Doulhwaito, Etonald Dennis, 0-2-0-1; Downs, Ronnie, 
0-1-0-0; Downs, Joseph W., 0-3-0-0; Drake, Richard R., 
8-6-3-0; Draud, Jon E., 6-6-0-0; Dryden, Wallace Lee, 
3-1-0-0; Duff, Eari, 6-6-0-0; Durkin, Jack, 5-2-1-0; 

Egan, Joseph Pat, 2-0-0-0; Elliott, CarroU L., 7-12-0-0; 
Ellis, Johnny, 0-11-1-1; Elovitz, Carl, 11-5-1-1; English, 
P. T., 1-0-0-0; Ernst, Edward R., 544-1; Fain, George, 
0-2-0-O; Fallon, Robert J., 2-1-0O; Faust, Jack, 1-7-3-1; 
Fay, John C, 2-12-1-0; Feck, Richard A., 0-1-0-0; Feni- 
more, Qarke E., 7-7-0-1; Ferguson, Roy F., 1-2-0-2; 
Ferguson, Thomas L., 1-2-0-0; Fields. Ronald Mac, 
4-5-0-0; Fish, Leland Gilbert, 6-5-1-1; Fitzpatrick, Ken- 
neth L. 1-3-0-0; Florence, Robert H., 4-2-0-0; Flynn, 
Robert D., 10-8-1-1; Fortney, Robert Lee, 6-13-0-2; Fos- 
ter, Berryman E., 0-1-0-0; Foster, Joe W., 8-6-0-1; Fra- 



ley. Bill, 5-7-4-1; Frankel, Louis S., 6-6-1-1; Franklin, 
James A., 2-2-0-0; Freese, OUie, 2-1-0-0; Fritsoh, Bill, 
2-0-0-0; Fryrear, Bill P., 6-10-0-2; Fucci, Dom, 114-4-0; 
Fuller, WUton, 2-11-2-0; 

Gallaher, Jack, 0-3-0-0; Galuk, Walter M., 4-7-0-0; 
Garrett, Richard A., 4-6-0-1; Gentry, Dale J., 3-11-3-0; 
Gentry. WilUam R.. Jr.. 1-0-0-0; Gettler, John E., 
2-12-2-2; Gfell, Gearge V., 9-5-3-0; Gilbert, Gerald L., 
10-10-0-0; Goforth, Bob. 0-2-1-0; Gore, Bailey, 3-5-0-1; 
Gorham, Hari-y C, 5-6-1-0; Gour, Bob, 6-12-1-0; Grace, 
Charles K., 5-6-0-2; Grace, Hickory, 3-7-0-0; Graham, 
Jim. 4-1-0-0; Griggs. John M., 3-0-0-0; 

Hadden, Newell P.. Jr.. 5-8-0-0; Hagan, Joe, 3-9-3-0; 
Hagerman. Bart, 2-6-0-1; Hall, Charles E., 2-7-1-1; Hall, 
Dale L., 1-1-1-0; HaU, Richard T.. 04-0-1; HaU, William 
W., 1-0-0-0; Hammock, Don L., 4-2-1-2; Hancock, Norb, 
4-9-1-2; Hardin, Artell, 1-0-0-0; Harris, David L., 3-3-1-0; 
Harris, RusseU, 4-10-1-0; Harris, Tom, Jr., 2-0-0-0; Har- 
rison, William H., 0-2-1-1; Hawkins, Don, 3-9-1-0; Heaber- 
lin Bill, l-O-O-O; Hedge, David WilUam, 2-13-2-0; Heirj- 
chen Carl C. 0-6-0 0; Heinold, Thomas, 5-1-0-0; Heinze, 
Frank, 11-10-1-0; Heinze, John G., 9-13-1-0; Hendon, 
L. J.. 4-3-1-2; Hill, Eari F., 9-12-1-2; Hina, Charles W., 
2-00-0; Hofs'.etter, Joe, 12-04)-0; HoUand, David W., 
74-0-2; Holman, Jo eph B., 2-6-1-0; Holman, S. T., 
"Bitsy," 4-2-0-0; Houthouser, Terry, 2-0-1-0; Holton, 
GlG;in H.. 0-1-0-0; Hor^man, Bill. 5-2-0-0; Houchin, 
Thoma;, 0-1-0-0; Howard, Robert E., 3-7-0-0; Hubbard, 
JohT Douglas, 2-2-0-0; Huber, Cari W., 4-12-2-1; Huber, 
Jerry. 2-0-0-0; Hughes, Paul P., 3-10-1-2; Hughes, Rob- 
ert E., 10-2-0-0; Humphrey, Joe, 0-1-0-0; Hunter, James, 
•Sid " 2-5-0-0; Huriey, K. E., 3-3-1-0; Hurley, Bob, 
2-3-CO; Hu£:on. Roderick J., 0-2-0-0; 

Idol, Billy Joe. .3-94-0; Idol, Uoyd, Jr., 2-3-3-0; In- 
gram, William, 0-1-0-0; Isaacs, Jack, 1-0-0-0; Isaacs, 
Jphn Frederick, 0-0-0-1; Isaacs, Marvin D., 24-0-0; 
Ishmael, Stephen A., 1-4-1-1; 

Jacoby, Ben, 3-3-3-1; James, Gene, 1-1-0-0; Jarrell, 
Frank W., 1-0-0-0; Jenkins, Beiyl, 0-1-0-0; Johns, Charles 
R., 3-2-0-0; Johnson. Bernard M., 1-0-0-0; Johnson, 
Charies Larry, 1-6-0-0; Johnson, Gordon M., 4-2-0-0; 
Johnson, Harry A., Jr.. 5-2-0-0; Johnson. Robert F., 
0-1-0-0; Johnson. Stan W.. 6-3-1-0; Jones. George W., 
0-1-0-0; Jones, J. Cari. 8-7-04; Jones, John H., 1-4-1-1; 
Jones, William L., 3-2-0-0; Jump, Frank E., 3-7-0-0; 
Junker, Edwin G., 0-1-1-0; 

Karr, Don, 2-7-0-0; Kaufman, Alvin B., 3-9-0-0; Kelly, 
Witlliam G.. 0-1-0-0; Kemper, Russ, 3-2-2-0; Khnble, 
Frank, 2-0-0-0; King, AUen, 6-2-3-0; Kirk, Charies Floyd, 
2444; Kraft, H. Nellis, 8-10-2-2; Kralzenberg, Ralph, 
0-3-3-1; Kratzenberg. Richard. 0-04-1; Kratzenberg, 
Robert R.. 0-044; Kuhl, Lawrence, 0-2-0-0; 

Laird, Ronald E., 5-0-0-1; Lambert, Irvin, 3-15-2-2; 
Landers, John F., 9-7-0-0; Lange, William E,, Jr., 
4-7-14; Law. William J., 4-9-0-0; Lawson, Leland, 
O-W-O; Leahy, Pat, 6-6-1-0; Lefevers, Ccriman J., 0-5-0-0; 
Lehkamp, Kenneth H., 7-4-2-2; Lenaiian, Thomas, 
11-11-1-0; Levy, Arthur E., 54-0-0; LJllie, WUliam Westly, 
04-0-0; Li;idon, Bob, 11-5-3-0; Lingo, Henry, 34-0-0; 
Linkes, Clifford, 0-1-0-0; Uoyd, Birt Leonard, 0-1-0-0; 
Logan, Eli, 4-7-0-0; Long, James E., 4-6-2-1; Lotz, 
Robert W., 2-104-1; Lowe, Gene T., 10-15-1-2; Lowe, 
Stan, 10-3-O-O; Lusby, George, 2-74-2; 

McComas, Mike, 1-2-1-0; McConachie, Bud, 2-8-1-2; 
McCormick. Donald, 5-6-0-0; McCormick. Don R., 
4-14-0; McCowan. Connell. 3-6-0-0; McCoy. Larry, 
0-2-0-0; McDaniel. Alan Curtis. 1-1-0-1; McFadden. Jim- 
mie. 7-9-2-0; McGehee. Gordon. 13-6-0-1; McKenzie, 
Robert L.. 0-1-0-0; McKinney. Adelle. 0-1-0-0; McLane, 
Albert I.. 5-13-0-0; McLaughlin. Calvin. 0-3-1-1; Mc- 
Lemore. Jack T., 4-7-1-0; McNamee, Jack, 0-2-0-0; 
McPeek, Tahnage, 2-5-0-0; 

Magruder, Earl L., 9-5-2-0; Mahan, James R., 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1969 



1-1-0-0; Marcum, Bruce, 2-0-0-0; Markham, James R., 
5-7-0-0; Martin, Thomas F., 2-1-0-0; Matarazzo, S. M., 
5-1-0-0; Mattingly, Charles, "Pete," 10-7-0-1; May, E. B., 
Jr., 12-10-0-0; Mayhew, William M., 8-8-1-0; Maynard, 
William D., 0-2-0-0; Melmige, James, Jr. ,8-3-0-0; 
Mercke, Frank R., 5-10-0-1; Mereker, George E., 
12-4-2-0; Met calf, Ken, 10-10-3-0; Metzger, Donald R., 
4-7-2-2; Meyer, Bud, 2-0-0-0; MiUerhaus, BiU, 1-0-0-0; 
Minta. Jrthn H., 3-4-0-0; Moody, William R., 3-6-2-1; 
Mooneyhan, James H., 7-12-0-0; Moore, James A., 
4-2-0-0; Moore, Robert, 2-0-0-fl; Mordica, William A., 
3-2-0-0; Morgan, Richard, 3-6-2-0; Morrissey, Rockne, 
2-2-0-0; Morse, Richard K., 4-5-3-0; Moser, Tonmiy G., 
1-2-0-0; Moss, Howard, 4-6-0-2; Murray, Thomas, 
11-7-3-1; 

Nassida, Frank R.. 1-0-0-2; Neal, Gene, 9-4-3-2; Nick- 
ell, Duane, "Red," 44-0-0; Niday, Paul, 0-1-0-0; Noland, 
Douglas, 4-9-2-0; Nolan, Michael Bruce, 0-2-0-0; Nord, 
Berlrand J., 5-16-0-0; Nord, Gilbert, 7-8-2-2; Norwood, 
Donald V., 4-0-0-3; Norwood, Thomas R., 6-8-1-1; 

Odil, William Randall, 3-13-1-1; Oldham, Ben Rich- 
ard, 3-6-3-0; Omer, Billy W., 4-8-1-2; Omer, Harold G., 
6-9-0-0; O'Neal, Bud, 4-9-1-0; O'Nan, Norman, 94-1-0; 
Orem. Dale Linton, 4-11-0-0; Osborne, Ted G., 1-7-3-1; 
Osting, James E., 3-1-1-1; 

Pace, Donald, 6-9-1-0; Padgett, R. K., 0-1-0-0; Page, 
James Neal, 0-4-1-0; Palmer, Carl A., 1-1-0-0; Pardue, 
I-racl L.. 3-3-1-0; Parker, Bob L.. 5-5-2-0; Parsley, 
Clyde E., 9-6-1-0; Pate, Lloyd W., 7-6-0-0; Paulk. John 
R., 4-4-0-1; Paxton. Gaiy R., 4-6-3-2; Peechc '. W. Lloyd, 
0-1-0-0; Peeno, Harry, 11-3-3-2; Pegaasch, William R., 
1-7-2-0; Pe;kins, Ro:inie L., 1-7-4-0; Perry. Tom, 0-3-0-0; 
Pietrowjki, Paul, 2-5-0-0; Pinson, Eugene, 1-2-0-0; Pitt- 
man. Spencer. 0-1-0-0; Plate, Arthur C, 0-1-1-0; Porco, 
Kenneth J., 5-8-2-0; Potter, Nat D., 0-2-0-0; Powers, 
Clark 0-2-1-0; Powers. Elmer, 5-1-0-2; Priode, Charles, 
1-4-0-0; Pugh, Roy D., 2-0-0-0; 

Ramev, Roy, 0-1-0-0; Rapp, Lowell D., 14-0-0; Rapp, 
C. WiUiam, 3-6-0-0; Raque, Ron. 0-8-2-0; Rawls, L. 
Tcwne5. 1-7-34; Ray, Bob, 4-94-0; Ray, CoUis R., 
6-4-0-0; Rav, Shirley G., 64-34; Read, Frederick, 
1-5-1-0; Reddington, Jim, 3-9-2-0; Reece, Fred, 134-1-0; 
Recce, Jerry T., 10-644; Reed, Goixlon Moe, 6-6-0-0; 
Reeves. Bob, 1-2-0-0; Renfro, James H., 3-3-0-0; Renfro, 
John E., 3-2-0-0; Rhodes, Cecil, 0-0-0-1; Riggins. Jason 
M., Jr., 4-0-0-0; Riggs, C. Dennis, 1-2-0-1; Riggs, William 
T., 74-0-0; Rmg, Bill, 1-9-34; Robinson, D. Blake, 
0-0-1-0; Robinson, Don L., 1-3-0-0; Robinson, J. Ward. 
2-0-1-1; Rodgers, H. Tom, 9-3-1-0; Roemele, Juett F., 
1-7-04; Rolph. Harold J., 0-2-0-0; Rudolph. Fred, Jr., 
1-3-3-0; Russell, Gary E., 8-8-0-0; Russell, Joe A., 
3-2-2-0; Russman, Godfrey F., 1-6-1-2; 

Sammons, Terry L., 2-5-0-0; Sanders, Mel, 84-0-0; 
Sapp, Edward, 6-11-1-0; Sauer, George E., Jr., 6-3-1-0; 
Saylors, Cariee, 54-0-2; Schad, Jim, 04-1-0; Sehmitt, 
Paul E.. 3-9-14; Schuble, Charles E., 6-7-2-3; Scott, 
W. L., 6-11-1-0; Seale, W, E., 1-5-3-2; Seavers, Joe. 
7-6-0-1; Selvy, Curt, 10-4-0-0; Shanks, Thomas, 0-10-1-1; 
Shaw, John H., 4-3-0-0; Shewmaker, Wayne, 5-8-1-0; 
Showalter, John, 3-5-2-5; Shumate. Fred, Jr., 0-1-1-0; 
Simms, Clarence, 4-3-1-0; Sizemore, Aster, 1-3-0-0; Sligh, 
Jim, 242-1-0; Sloan, Wallace, 3-1044; Slone. Earl D., 
6-7-0-0; Small, David E., 1-0-0-0; Smith. Robert Eugene. 
1-244; Smith, William E., 0-14-0; South. Stanley P., 
1-5-0-1; Spath, William J., 6-6-1-0; Spaulding, Johnny R., 
14-0-0; Speaks, Cart V., 1-2-0-0; Staley, Jerry, 1-7-3-2; 
Staples, Jerry D., 6-9-0-0; Staten, Joe, 1-5-2-0; Stephens, 
Herbert D., 0-2-0-0; Slephenson. Harry S., 6-2-0-1; Ste- 
vens, William D., 2-9-0-0; Strain, R'chard P., 3-12-2-1; 
Strong, Arnett, 7-7-0-0; Stuart, Joe G., II, 0-3-O-1; 
Stunrbo, Jack, 1-1-0-0; Sucietto, Richard. 0-1-0-1; SuUi- 
van, A. G., 2-6-0-0; Sullivan, Don Chris, 64-2-0; Swarts, 
Joseph C, 1-5-0-0; Swintord, John, 3-12-1-0; 



Tackett, Jay, 4-94-0; Talbot, WiUiam G., Ill, 1-10-0-2; 
Taylor, DennJs H., 4 5-0-0; Taylor, James R., 0-1-1-0; 
Thomas, Bill, 3-2-0-1; Thompson, Jack, 64-0-0; Thomp- 
son, Tom D., 6-3-2-0; Thrasher, Phillip, 3-2-0-1; Timmer- 
ing, George E., 1-7-2-2; Treas, Joe W., 5-2-0-2; Treibly, 
Chartes E., 1-2-0-0; 

Ullage, Richard, 44-2-0; 

Van Zant, Jim, 6-0-0-0; Varner, Ray G., 3-6-0-1; Ven- 
nell, Robert H., 1-0-0-0; Vinciquerra, Phillip, 3-5-0-0; 
Vissman, Chartes F., 0-2-1-0; 

Wagner, Jim, 10-12-1-1; Waide, Harry D., 6-3-2-1; 
Walker, Julian R., 2-11-04; Walker, Paul R., 9-5-1-0; 
Waller, Bobbie E., 4-9-04; Wanchic, Nicholas, 84-3-0; 
Warren, Buist, "Buzz," 5-10-0-0; Warren, Kenneth A., 
4-5-0-1; Washaleski, Tom, 24-0-0; Washer, James P., 
340-3-0; Washer, Stan, 2-7-5-0; Watts, Shiriey, 16-10-0-0; 
Weaver, Clyde Ivan, 3-2-0-0; Weaver, Ray, 2-3-0-0; Webb, 
Keaton, l-l-O-O; Webb, Ralph Dudley, 9-5-1-1; Weber, 
Thomas C, 2-3-24; Webner. J. Randall. 1-2-1-0; Werko- 
witz. Jack, 2-1-0-0: White, John S., 0-0-1-0; Whitt, Hobert 
E., 0-0-1-0; Wickham, J.ames R., 24-3-1; Wilbert, Donald 
A., 2-0-0-0; Wilbert, Louis, 2-1-04; Willey, Harold L., 
04-0-0; Williams, James H., 1-3-14; Willis, Donald A., 
0-9-3-1; Wilson, John Pope, 1-2-0-0; Wilson, Louis O., 
9-12-04; Wise. Billy V., 15-12-0-0; Wise, Jack, 17-8-14; 
Wittenburg, Howard, 0-14-0; Wray, Robert F., 10-9-3-1; 
Wright. James L., 2-5-34; 

\c-,uig. Jack, 1-0-0-1 

Ziranka, Benny J., 3-3-2-0; Zimmer, Thomas, 
1041-3-3. 



BASKETBALL QUESTIONS 

(Continued from Page One I 
be legal, must be set at a minimum distance of a normal 
step. 

27. Play: While Al is in a throwing motion for a 
field goal or for a free throw attempt. Bl pushes A2. 

Ruling: A foul by Bl during a try by Al does not 
cause the ball to become dead immediately. 

28. Play: Al Ls dribbling in his front court. Bl bats 
the ball so that it strikes the foot of A3 and then the 
ball rolls into the back court of team A, where Al 
recovers it. 

Ruling: Violation. The ball is awarded to team B at 
the nearest out of bounds spot. The bat by Bl does not 
terminate control by team A. 

29. Play: Al is charged with his fifth personal 
foul. Prior to completing the entry of A6, the replace- 
ment for- Al, the coach of team A calls his team over 
to the side line to advise it. 

Ruling: Legal. Team A must complete the substi- 
tution of the replacement within one minute, but imtil 
the substitution is completed, the coach may leave the 
bench and instinct his team at the side line. Team 
members may not leave the court. Officials will put 
tiie ball in play immediately after the replacement has 
entered the game, even if less than the minute has 
been consumed. 

30. Play: A5 is personal fouled flagrantly by Bl. 
After A5 has taken one free throw attempt awarded 
him, it is discovered A5 was disqualified earlier in the 
game. 

Ruling: The first free throw attempt is over. If A5 
made the goal, it counts. A5 is replaced and the second 
free throw attempt will be made by his substitute. Any 
member of team B may attempt the free throws result- 
ing from the flagrant teclinical foul assessed A5. After 
all free throws have been tried, the ball is put in play 
by a jump at the center. 

31. Play: Al is inbounds when he passes toward 
a side line. The pass is: (a) simultaneously touched by 
A2 and Bl, both of whom are on or outside a boundary; 
or (b) caught by Bl, Who is out of bounds. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1969 



Page Nine 



Ruling: In (a), jump ball in the nearest circle 
between A2 and Bl. In (b), the baU is awarded to team 
A at the soot out of bounds where Bl touched the pass 
of Al. 

32. Play: Al turns his back to his opponent and 
holds the ball through the plane of an out of bounds 
boundary. Bl. while attempting to reach the ball, steps 
on or over the boundary and then toucahes the ball. 

Ruling: Bl causes the ball to go out of bounds. The 
ball is awarded out of bounds to team A. 

33. Play: Al is in the game but is not recorded in 
the score bcx)k. 

Ruling: If Al leaves, there is no penalty. If he stays 
m the game, his name must be entered and cost him a 
technical. Any field goals he scores may be credited to 
the team. If he commits a foul, ihis name must be put 
in the book and a penalty will be assessed. 

34. Play: Al is awarded a bonus penalty. On the 
first atitempt, boih Bl and A2 are in the lane too soon 
and: (a) the ball goes through the basket; or (b) lihe 
ball does not go in. 

Ruling: In both (a) and (b), the violation by A2 
causes the ball to become dead; hence, no point can be 
scored. Neither a substitute throw nor a bonus throw 
is awarded. The ball is put in play by a jump between 
emy two opponents at the free throw line. 

35. Play: Al throws at B's basket and then 
catches the rebound and dribbles. 

Ruling: Double dribble. A cannot make a try at 
B's b:isket, and, therefore, Al has not, by definition, 
given up control of the ball. Obviously, if Al were con- 
fused and had intended to throw for a goal, not realiz- 
ing it was the wrong basket, the violation would usually 
be disregarded. 

36. Play: Al receives the ball while standing in his 
free tlirow lane with his back toward his basket. After 
receiving the bcdl, he simultaneously starts to pivot 
and starts his aiTn movement, which will end in a try 
for goal. As he steps, he is pushed by Bl, but Al con- 
tinues his pivot and the release of the ball for a success- 
ful goal. 

Ruling: Basket counts, aSter which one free throw 
is awarded. 

37. Play: Al is driving in for a try when Bl inten- 
tionally pushes him in the back: (a) before Al receives 
the ball; or (b) after Al receives the ball and has 
started his try. 

Ruling: (a) two free throws. The goal does not 
count if action continues and the ball goes in the basket, 
(b) two free throws and, in addition, the goal counts if 
successful. 

38. Play: Players attempt to take positions along 
the free ^throw lane: (a) when the throw is one of a 
false double foul; (b) when there is to be a multiple 
throw with the first one for a personal and the last for 
a teohnioal foul; or (c) when the multiple throw order 
is reversed. 

Ruling: In (a) and (b), the official should order 
the players away from the lane. In (c), alley number 
one on each side of the free throw lane must be occu- 
pied during the second throw and other lane spaces may 
be occupied. 

Comment: Alleys number one on each side of the 
free throw lane must be occupied during a free throw 
which is awarded for a personal foul, other than when 
a false double foul was involved (and by implication, a 
false multiple foul when the last foul is technical, or 
when the ball is to be dead after the last throw). It is 
not compulsory for players to occupy the other spaces 
along the free throw lane, although they may. 



Major Activity of the 1969 

Football Rules Committee 

Atlanta, Georgia, January 9-10, 1969 

Note: This is a brief summai-y of Che more impor- 
tcint modifications to football iTiles authorized by the 
National Alliance Rules Committee during its 1969 
meeting. 

CHECK-UP ON 1968 CODE: Questionnaires were 
mailed to coaches and officials through state assoda- 
iion offices, the National Junior College Athletic Asso- 
ciation and the National Association of Intercollegiate 
Athletics. lij.OOO fomis were distributed and in excess 
of 6,300 were returned and tabulated. The complete min- 
utes contain a summary of the vote on each of the 
lifted items and a tabulation of the significant com- 
ments which were requested on tlie back of the quec- 
lionnaire. The returns indicate a very high degree of 
satisfaction wjih the changes which had been made for 
the 19S8 season. Last season's provision for using soft, 
flexible pylons at the intersections of the side lines and 
goal lines, was approved by more than 95% of the 
respondents, as was the rule specifying that interrupted 
games .;hall be continued from vhe point of interrup- 
tion when there were no state association standards 
covering such a situation. Prohibiting the use of me- 
chanical visual aid equipment for coaching purposes 
any time during the game was endorsed by a margin 
of 8 to 1. 4,374 respondents favored elimination of ithe 
short free-kick, while 1,844 opposed the change. Hew- 
ever, the provision for first touching of a tree-kick 
before it had crossed the receiver's free-kick line or 
been touched there by a receiver, was approved by 
nearly a 9 to 1 margin. Item 6, prohibiting a receiver 
who signals for a fair catch from blocking until the kick 
is ended, received approval of 11 of 12 returns. The 
speciticaMon that a penally for a foul committed during 
a live ball, is either automatioaUy accepted or declined 
wnen it was followed by a foul by the opponents after 
the ball had become dead, was favored by 5,384 respond- 
ents compared to 559 voting "no." More than 87% fa- 
vored the change whidh restricted all ineligibles to the 
expanded neutnal zone, until a pass which crossed the 
line of scrimmage was in flight The 1968 revision pro- 
viding a penalty for failure to properly wear equipment 
continuously, was also favored by a margin of approxi- 
mately 8 to 1. Even thougih the action concerning the 
automatic acceptance or declination of penalties for a 
foul during live ball follewed by a dead ball foul was 
overwhelmingly approved, the committee concluded the 
1968 revision did not completely eliminate the inequities 
and for the 1969 season a revision was adopted Which 
will eliminate those inequities. 

Clipping continues to be a major problem. Slightly 
less than half of the respondents indicated it is a mat- 
ter of concern. 2,949 indicated that the failure of oM- 
cials to observe all of the action when calling chpping 
was a significant factor. This matter was called to the 
attention of both coaches and officials as a point of 
special emphasis for 1968. The next most prevalent 
problem, as indicated by the questionnaire results, con- 
cerned the coverage during passing situations. Slightly 
more thaii one-third of the men answering the question- 
naire indicated dissatisfaction with such coverage. The 
next ranking problem was that of determining the eli- 
gible pass receivers in varied formations. Because of 
the greater number of forward passes from a variety 
of formations, in recent sesaons, the defense has found 
it increasingly difficult to determine eligible pass re- 
ceivers, particularly when there is shifting from the 
backfield to the line of scrimmage. Other items which 
were noted as problems included Che movement by the 
quarterback immediately prior to the snap, and the 
contacting of the passer after the pass had been ^thrown. 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1969 



No specific action was taken by the 1969 committee to 
affect there problem areas. Roughing the passer has 
been ithe subject of comment in the points of special 
emphasis as well as ithe subject of a teaching unit in- 
cluded in the annual football rules meeting folder. 

COMMriTEE REPORTS: During the course of each 
football season, a number of suggestions for improving 
the National AllicOice Code are submitted to the Nation- 
al Federation office. Each of these, along with recom- 
moiidaldons from committee members and Parts II 
and III of the National Alliance Football Questionnaire, 
are assigned to one of -the five standing subcommittees 
for coixsidei ation. Before any matter of rules revision 
may be brought before the National Alliance Football 
Rules Commiijtee, it must have been considered in one 
of the subcommittee meetings and approved for presen- 
tation to the Committee-of-the-Whole or be included as 
an item on the questionnaire. Each subcommittee met 
prior to the first session of Oie Coramittee-of-the-Whole. 
Meetings were scheduled .so that committee members 
were privileged to attend two different sessions. During 
the first general session, reports from the various stand- 
ing subcommittees were presented to the Committee-of- 
the-Whole and provided a wealth of material upon 
which ito base consideration during the 1969 meeting. A 
complete copy of each of the reports from the Equip- 
ment, Injm-y Data, Game Administration, Researdh 
and Statistical, and Safety Committees, are included 
in the complete minutes. 

AUTHORIZED RULES REVISION FOR 1969: 

1-2-7: The note foUowing this a:\lclc will be changed 
to state that the use of goals with a distance of 23'4" 
between the uprights abave *he crossbar is optional for 
the 1969 and 1970 seasons, and vfiil be mandatory in 
1971. 

l-5-3d: A note will follow this article indicating that 
begmning wiih the 1971 .^eason, the maximum lergth 
of football shoe cleats will be %". 

2-2-1: The definition was revised to provide that con- 
tact is required in blocking. The new definition will 
state that blocking is obstructing an opponent by con- 
tacting h:m with any part of the blocker's body. 

2-4: The adoption expands the area in which blocking 
from the rear is legal. It consists of a rectangular area 
extending laterally 4 yards on either side of the spot of 
the snap and 3 yards behind each scrimmage line. 

3-5-1; 3-5-3; and 3-5-4: These articles will be changed 
slightly to authorize a player or a substitute to request 
a time-out at the direction of a coach when the coach 
feels there is a possibility a rule may have been mis- 
interpreted or misapplied. Following the request for 
time-out for this purpose, the officials will confer. The 
referee may then, if he elects, discuss the matter with 
the coach at the side line directly in front of the team 
box. The coach is not authorized to come on the field. 
The change will provide that if an offidal -had erred, 
the mistake will be corrected and the time-out charged 
to the officials. However, if the coach's contention was 
wrong and there is no correction to make, the time-out 
will be charged to the team unless it has no time-outs 
remaining, in which case it will be penalized for delay 
of game. The request for consideration may be made 
only for those matters which involve the misapplication 
or the setting aside of a rule. The judgment of an offi- 
cial is not to be questioned. No request will be consid- 
ered imless it is made before the ball is put in play fol- 
lowing the down during wihidi the questioned call 
occurred. 

3-6-2: A .slight reordering of the article is necessary 
to correlate it with the changes in 3-5. The present 
item (c) will be designated as (d) and a new item (c) 
will be inserted. The revision will provide that it is 
delay of game when a co.aoh asks for a conference and 
there was no error, and his team had no time-outs 



rema.rang. 

3-7-1; 3-7-2: These articles have been revised slightly 
for purposes of clarification. Article 1 has been divided 
to form a new article 2 and artiole 2 has been changed 
to 3. A new article 4 will be added to provide -that when 
a substitute or a replaced player is an excessive man 
and dearly not participating in a play, it is illegal 
suhstitution. (Another section under Rule 9 will provide 
that participation by excessive men constitutes a form 
-of illegal participation and -carries a 15-yard penalty.) 

4-2-1: An editorial change in this article will specify 
that When a foul occurs immediately prior to a snap or 
free-kick, an offidal shall cause the ball to remain dead. 

4-3-2: Tlie article will be rewritten to establish the 
out of-bounds spot when a player leaps from the field 
of play and lands out-of-bounds in advance of where he 
crossed the out-of-bounds line. 

6-1-1: A sentence will be added to the article to per- 
mit the use of a punt as a free-kick following a safety. 

74-3: T3ie editorial committee was requested to re- 
view the present coverage relative to a player leaping 
':o catch a baclcward pass or fumble and landing out-of- 
bounds. 

7-5a: The dassification of forward passes will be 
revised slightly to indioa'te that it is an illegal pass 
whenever a pass is made from a point which is beyond 
B's line of scrimmage. This point coi-responds to the 
placement of the down marker and is -the point of refer- 
ence generally used by officials in determining whether 
a pa": was thrown before the player crossed the line. 

7-5C: I cms (,i) a::l (b) will be rearranged and 
revised fro darity. Tliere is a differentiation between 
pass interference and cin ineligible illegally downfield. 
A new article (7-5-7) will be included restricting ineli- 
gible A players to the neutral zone until a pass which 
crosses the line is in flight. The penalty for both fouls 
remains ithe same. 

8-3-1: A change in the article will spedfy that the 
try-for^point will be attempted from the scored upon 
team's 3 yardline. 

8-3-3: A companion change to 8-3-1 provides that 
during a try-for-point, team A may score 2 points from 
wihat would ordinarily be a touchdown and 1 point for a 
field-goal or a safety by B. 

8-3-4: The article \v:U be expanded to provide that 
When there is a foul by B during a successful try, team 
A wiU have the choice of accepting the penalty smd 
replaying the try from the IV2 yardline (half -the dis- 
tance) or of accepting the result of the play. (The pen- 
alty for a foul by B during a successful try will continue 
to be administered on the succeeding kick-off.) 

8-5-4: A sentence will be added to provide that a free- 
kick following a safety may be either a drop-kick, 
place-kick, or punt. 

9-3h: The requirement that a -player or his team 
must be warned before a foul for unsportsmanlike con- 
duct may be assessed when a player fails to properly 
wear the required equipment continuously, will be 
deleted. 

9-31: The list of examples of unsportsmanlike conduct 
has been expanded to "indude a player mtentionally 
kicking or throwing the ball from the playing field 
following a touchdown. 

10-1-2: The article providing for automatic accept- 
ance or declination of penalties has been deleted. 

10-2-1: The administration of penalties when there 
are fouls by both teams (except those that are simulta- 
neous dead ball fouls and live ball fouls before change 
of possession) will be in the order of occurrence and 
measured separately. 

ENFORCEMENT DIAGRAM: The present enforce- 
ment diagrams will be replaced with revised diagrams 
and explanations. The new material will be designated 
as the "All But One" principle. The prindple involved 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1969 



Page Eleven 



Seating Chart of Freedom Hall 




> 

m 
z 

H 

> 
2 

n 
tn 



wiU not be disturbed. The new diagrams to be used in 
the 1969 edition of the Rules Bool< were included in the 

1968 meeting folder and the editorial cxjmrnent will be 
very similar to that which accompanied those diagrams. 

SIGNALS: Two new signals were estabUshed. First, 
is a signal indicating first touching of a kick. It was 
recommended that the signal for this be tossing the cap 
to the spot of the first touching. The use of such a sigiial 
would be advantageous inasmuch as it would also desig- 
nate the alternate spot fi-om Which the ball may be put 
in play. The second signal which was suggested was to 
use signal No. 15, that is, the referee patting the top of 
his head, to designate a man illegally downfield. This 
would be followed by a loss of down signal. Because 
the Officials Manual is published on the even numbered 
years, these two new signals will be included for the 
first time in the 1970 edition. 

CASE BOOK SITUATION: 

Interpretations for several listed situations were re- 
quested and authorized. These will be included in the 

1969 edition of 1lie Case Book. The following specific 
inteiprelations were considered: 

1. FOOTBALL SHOE: The definition of a shoe is 
that it shall be made of a material which covers the 
foot (canvas, leather or plastic) attached to a firm sole 
of leather, rubber or composition material which may 
have cleats which comply with the rules, or whi<ih may 
be cleatless. Such a shoe offers participants protection 
and is the reason for the requirement in the National 
Alliance Code. Items which do not meet the require- 
ment are ballet slippers, slipper socks, heavy socks with 
laces inserted, and tennis shoes cut so that protection is 
reduced. 

2. OUT-OF-BOUNDS: Discussion of several .situations 
in whidi a runner leaps from the field of play with the 
ball and ailghts out-of-bounds in advance of the spot 
where he crossed the side line, wiU be included. Plays 
1 and 2 of the 1964 Early Season Questions— Installment 



I were suggested. 

3. PARTICIPATION OF AN ILLEGAL SUBSTI- 
TUTE: A Case Book situation wiU be developed to cor- 
relate rules 7-2-4 and 9-3e, to e.xplain the differences 
between usmg a substitute to deceive and participaiiton 
by an illgal substitute. It was the intention of the rules 
committee that both of these fouls should carry a 15- 
yard penalty because of the seriousness of the infrac- 
tions. 

POINTS OF SPECIAL EMPHASIS: Each year, the 
National Alliance Rules Committee specifies certain 
areas which are to be given special attention by all 
those responsible for- teaching football rules. The 1969 
committee was no exception. Four items have been 
designated to Be placed in this category for this year. 

1. GORING AND SPEARING: The committee di- 
rected the editorial committee to repeat, in principle, 
ihe material on goring and spearing but to use stronger 
language in emphasizing that these tactics should be 
eliminated from the game. 

2. INTENTIONAL GROUNDING: Guidelines for as- 
sisting officials in determining when there is intentional 
grounding of a forward pass to save loss of yardage 
will be developed. 

3. PARTICIPATION BY AN ILLEGAL SUBSTI- 
TUTE: When to penalize for participation by an exces- 
sive man, whether he is an incoming substitute or a 
player who has been substituted for, was a matter of 
considerable concern to the committee. The difference 
between an IDegal substitution and partidpajtion by the 
substitute will be thoroughly explained in the points of 
emphasis. 

4. PASS INTERFERENCE: The National Alliance 
penalty for both offensive and defensive pass interfer- 
ence is both logical and fair. Comments which illustrate 
and support the National Alliance Code will be included. 
Special emphasis wiU be given to the assessment of 
the penalty authorized when the interference is inten- 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1969 



The Special Football Plan Designed For 
Kentucky High School Football Coaches As- 
sociation Will Be Offered In Connection With 
An Excellent Student Accident Coverage For 
Your Schools. 
Your Inquiries Will Be Answered Promptly. 



Ike KiHi^den Co4Hfixi4Uf> 



GENERAL AGENT 



W. E. KINGSLEY 



121-123 LAFAYETTE AVENUE 
P. O. BOX 7100 



J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. 
Life Department 

LEXINGTON, KY. 40502 



CHARLES C. PRICE 
PHONE 254^095 



tional. 

GENERAL: A number of editorial changes in the 

Rules Book, Case Book, and Football Manual, necessi- 
tated by changes voted, were authorized by the com- 
mittee. The editorial committee will improve the pres- 
ent language in order to increase understanding without 
changing intent of the rules sections wherever feasible. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 

REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 
(Lisf Compiled February 1.) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone unless otherwise designated. If two numbers are 
given the first number is that of the home phone. 

Bryan, Phil, 651 Ra%'en, Frankfort, 223-8403, 227-2838 
Donahue, Owen, 1807 Pheasant Hills Drive, Loveland, Ohio, 

683-2283, 821-3811, Ext. 320 
Fritz, Robert G.. 626 Jimwood Drive, Vine Grove, 877-5688, 

877-2210 
King, P. J., 3775 Thruston-Dermont Road, Owensboro, 683-2169 
Kohls, Paul H., 5501 Sidney Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 
Leber, Jerry L., 1308 High St., Bowling Green, 843-2326 
Taylor, Richard, Box 633 Brockton, Eastern Kentucky Univer- 
sity, Richmond, 623-7771 

1014 Shelby, Ashland 
Route 1, Dixie Park, Berea, 986-4576, 



Ticknor, William G., 
Tillery, William E 

254-6500 
Wells, Andy, 12311 



Davidson, Middletown. 245-4923, 634-9406 



Willike, Fred C. 
371-8832 



5341 Plumridge, Cincinnati, Ohio, 922-7404, 



Elmer Rides Again 

ELmer Kelley of Madisonville, poet laureate of the 

K.H.S.A.A., who has written poems for the last three 

state basketball tournaments, now presents Ws 1969 
effort. 

Ode to a King 

Wait, Oh spring, 'tis not yet time 
To melt a stream or send the sun 

Across the land to change the cUme. 
We've points to make, fouls to call. 

It's tourney lime, in Freedom HaU. 

Hold back the jonquil, stiU the sound 
The Thrush would make within his throat 

While snow is yet upon the ground. 
We've but a while to crown the King, 

As March retires in one last fling. 

There's madness here, as tensions soar 
To heights n'er dreamed within the fight 

That steins the brink, and then some more. 
A second may decide the fate, 

Of ones in time, or those too late. 

No matter how the die is cast 
When final gun is sounded here 

And one remains until the last; 
We'll stand and join as thousands sing 

Their praises to Kentucky's king! 



i^ 



SUTCLIFFE'S SALUTES 

the many individuals whose tireless eiiorts make our 
Kentucky tournament the success that it is — the hun- 
dreds of behind-the-scenes specialists who know their 
jobs and do them so welL 

COACHES 

Try Sutcliffe's — supplying team Use Sutcliffe's field force of spe- 
and school athletic supplies for more ^^i^'^Y school representatives whose 



than 60 years. 



business it is to help coaches and 
principals with their athletic equip- 
ment budget. 



Try Sutcliffe's fas't shipping service 
from our huge Louisville warehouse 
stocks. electric scoreboards. 



Use Sutcliffe's for anything in ath- 
fromour huge Louisville warehouse j,^;, ^^ppji^^ from 'handballs to 



Sutcliffe's solicits your interest, 
your inquiries, and your orders. 




UTCLIFFE CO. 

BOX 959 LOUISVILLE, KY. 40201 



K.H.S. A. A. TOURNAMENT DIRECTORS 

District and Re8:ional Tournament Directors can get all of their supplies 
and needs to run a tournament from Hunt's. We have the merchandise 
listed below in stock for immediate shipment. Call or write us your needs. 

BASKETBALLS 

Get the feel of a basketball same as will be used in the State Tournament in 
Louisville, and in your District or Regional Tournament. We have all 
brands. 

ADMISSION TICKETS 

Complete stock of admission tickets, 2,000 tickets to the roll numbered con- 
secutively. Printed ADULT, STUDENT, and ADMIT ONE. $1.50 per roll 
of 2,000. 

TROPHIES AND AWARDS 

We can take care of your Sportsmanship trophies, individual charms for 
All-Star teams, etc. Our stock is complete and we can engrave in our store 
and ship to you at once. 

ACCESSORIES 

Nets, scorebooks, first-aid supplies, whistles, stopwatches, timers' horns, 
powdered rosin, bath towels, shoe laces, colored top sweat socks, carry-all 
bags. All of this merchandise in stock for at once delivery. 

BANKS AND GOALS 

We have a complete stock of fan-shaped steel, fan-shar)ed and rectaneular 
glass backboards complete with goals and nets in stock for at once delivery. 
A phone call will get them off to you at once. 



FAIR-PLAY ELECTRIC BASKETBALL SCOREBOARDS 

We have IN STOCK the Fair Play Tick-A-Way Scoreboard ready for imme- 
diate shipment. A call will get one to your gymnasium before tournament 
time. 

Turn all of your needs over to us. We will be glad to handle them for you. 
ROY BOYD, JIM MITCHELL, WADE BURLESON or C. A. BYRN, JR. 
are always ready to assist you in every way possible. 

If you want the BEST QUALITY and the BEST SERVICE contact HUNT'S 

HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO, INC. 

CH 7-1941 — PHONES — CH 7-1942 

MAYFIELD. KENTUCKY 
PHONE 459-6366 LOUISVILLE, KY. 



We ShipThe Dav^Vou BuV 








HiqhkhoolAthMe 



THE NORTH HARDIN HIGH SCHOOL 
1969 CHAMPIONSHIP WRESTLING TEAM 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Robert Roach, Ronnie Hickok, Charles 
Davis, Arvil Meyers, Jerry Hannah, Robert Harkleroad, Second Row: 
Coach Bruce Douty, Bernie Head, Tony Smalley, Ed Brandon (Most Out- 
standing Wrestler), Lucky Vervilles, Charles Roach, Mike Miller, Charles 
Nesselrodt. 



Official Organ of the 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

March, 1969 



Modern Ides of March 






The gym lights gleam like a beacon beam 
And a million motors hum 

In a good will flight on a Friday night; 
For basketball beckons, "Come!" 



A sharp-shooting mite is king tonight. 

The Madness of March is running. 
The winged feet fly, the ball sails high 

And field goal hunters are gunning. 






The colors clash as silk suits flash 

And race on a shimmering floor. 

Repressions die, and partisans vie 
In a goal acclaiming roar. 



On Championship Trail toward a holy grail. 
All fans are birds of a feather. 

It's fiesta night and cares lie light 
When the air is full of leather. 



Since time began, the instincts of man 
Prove cave and current men kin. 

On tournament night the sage and the wight 
Are relatives under the skin. 



It's festival time, — sans reason or rhyme 
But with nationwide appeal. 

In a world of hate, our ship of state 
Rides high on an even keel. 



With war nerves tense, the final defense 
Is the courage, strength and will 

In a million lives where freedom thrives 
And liberty lingers still. 



Let commies clash and empires crash 
'Neath the wreck of a victory arcK! 

Let our boys tread where hate is dead, — 
In this happy Madness of March! 

— H. V. Porter. 



1 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXXI— NO. 8 



MARCH, 1969 



$1.00 Per Year 



Why Do Rules Change? 

By Clifford B. Fagan 
National Federation Executive Secretary 

Spectators frequenitly ask the question. "Why do 
rules dhange?" Players and officials present this query 
less often because they are more inclined to know the 
answer. 

Rules change because the game changes. The bas- 
ketball fan commonly, but erroneously, believes that 
the Rules Committee meets annually to change rules 
and. as a result, the game is changed. This is not the 
order of events e.xcept in rare instances. The rules are 
quite likely to .be somewhat behind the game skiUs, 
strategies and techniques. 

For example. Dr. Naismith's rules provided that a 
player could catch the bail but, having caught it, he 
could do nothing but pass it to a teammate or try for a 
goal. Under these circumstances, it was a cinch for a 
guard to tie up his ball handling opponent who was 
rooted to one spot. In a short time some players began 
bouncing the ball on the floor and thereby "aotuaUy 
advancing it" by means of a series of bounces. There 
was nothing in tihe rules to prevent this maneuver and 
soon it became popular as an offensive weapon. 

Soon abuses became evident. Instead of bouncing 
the ball on the floor, the clever players began to tap the 
ball upward and what we now know as the "air dribble" 
developed. Those adept at the air dribble would tap the 
ball only a few inches above the fingertips while 
advancing at fiiU speed all of the way into the .scoring 
position. Short of fouling, there usually was no effective 
way of stopping this maneuver. Soon there were rules 
limiting the dribbler to one air dribble and preventing 
the resumption of any type of dribble once the player 
had ended an air dribble by holding the ball in one or 
both hands. 

Another illustration giving evidence that the rules 
usually lag the development of the game is as follows: 
During the late twenties and early thirties, the game 
was threatened by a type of play in v/hich the team 
successful in scoring a few points early in the game 
would retreat to a remote comer of the back court and 
refuse to advance the ball into scoring position. If the 
defense attempted to force the issue, the team ahead in 
score would maneuver over the entire court while resort- 
ing to "keep away" tactics. Sometimes there would be 
entire periods of complete inaction and the games 
would end with ridiculous scores, such as, 5 to 0; 7 to 6; 
or 8 to 3. Spectators became not only disinterested, but 
disgusted, and, as a result, both attendance and interest 
in the game were affected. Eventually, and perhaps in 
the nick of time, the rtiles were changed so as to elimi- 
nate this abuse. The team with the ball was allowed 10 
seconds in which to advance it to its front court and 
severe restrictions were placed upon it returning the 
ball to its back court. 

These are only two of the many possible illustrations 
(ihat tlhe rules frequently lag behind the skill, strategies 
and techniques of the game. Narturally, there are some 
exceptions to this general statement. Sometimes changes 
in the gam.e result in rules changes which precede the 



development of a particular strategy or technique. 
Sometimes new rules mu.st be written to eliminate unde- 
sirable developments and other times encourage desir- 
able developments and other times encourage desirable 
trends in the game. 

As the game develops and new features are added, 
rules coverage must be provided. AH of the phases of 
the game did not come into being during the same 
period, and certainly not simultaneously. As they be- 
come part of tlie game, the rules must be devised to 
regulate them. Also, the game is becoming increasingly 
complicated and, as a result, the rules must frequently 
be adapted. As the game becomes more involved, so 
must the rules. The rules for a simple game, such as 
dodge ball, are brief and easy to comprehend. A game 
which has become as sophisticated as modem basket- 
ball requires detailed rules coverage. 

A distinct philosophy of rules writing has been devel- 
oped down through the years by the Basketball Commit- 
tee. In drafting a desirable code of basketball rules, 
definite criteria must be observed and certain guide- 
lines must be followed. Among those criteria and guide- 
lines are the following: 

1. Fair play. The rules must, first of all, include 
guarantees of fair play to the end that no player and 
neither team gains an unfair advantage over an oppo- 
nent. This criterion is basic and transcends all other 
considerations. 

2. Balance. Must be maintained between offense 
and defense. In basketball, as in all other team games, 
the teams alternate in becoming the offense and de- 
fense. If interest is to be maintained, these two phases 
of the game must be kept in approximate balance. A 
game in which the offense scores with ridiculous ease 
has no merit. By the .same token, a game in which the 
scoring of points is ne.xt to impossible becomes boring. 

3. Definitions. A good set of rules will carefully 
define the various words and expressions (e.g., dribble, 
foul, change of status, front and back court, etc.) used 
in playing the game. These wUl be placed near the 
beginning of the code. Definitions eliminate the need for 
detailed and lengthy explanatory wording in the latter 
sections of the rules. 

4. Brevity. The rules must be expressed in a brief 
and concise language. Repetition must necessarily be 
avoided whenever possible. Explanations and illustra- 
tions of rules coverage must be left to related and corol- 
lary rules publications. An inordinate number of inter- 
pretations and explanations tend to clutter up a func- 
tional set of rules. 

5. Exceptions. Exceptions to any portion of existing 
rules should be studiously avoided except in very rare 
cases where a lack of specified limited exceptions 
would result in serious inequity. For example, an excep- 
tion, of the dead ball rule permits the ball to remain 
alive and the goal to count if successful, whenever a 
foul occurs or ithe wtoisUe is blown while the ball is in 
flight following a field goal try, or when a pla> or, in the 
act of trj^g for a field goal, is fouled by an opponent. 
Too many exceptions make it difficult to learn and ap- 
ply rules. 

(Continued on Page Eight) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1969 



VOL. XXXI— NO. 8 



MARCH, 1969 



Published monlhly, cxrept June and .lulv. by the Kentucky 

Hiph School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington. Ky. 40501 

Second class postage paid at I.exinpton. Kentucky. 

Editor THKO. A. S WFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. .MANSFIELD 

Lexington. Ky. 

BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Preston Holland (1965-60). Muriny 

Vice-President _ Ralph C. Dorsey (1966-70). Horse Tare 

Directors — W. H. ("rowdus (196,9-71). Franklin; Morton Tombs 
(1968-72). Carr Creek: Don Davis (l',)67-71). Independence; 
Jame.i T. Dotson (196S-72). Johns Creek: lion R. Rawlinrjs 
(1965-69), Danville: Foster J. Sanders (1966-70), Louisville. 
Subscription Rate . $1.00 per Year 

Zfiom the Commissioned s CJfji 



ice 



REPORTS NOW DUE 

1. 1968-69 Basketball Participation List 

2. School's Report on Basketball Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Basket- 
ball) 



Spring Meets 



Tentative dates have been set for the various spring 
meets and tournaments in gymnastics, rifle marks- 
manship, baseball, track, golf and tennis. They are as 
follows: 

April 5, State Gv-mnastics Meet 

April 26, State Rifle Championship 

May 5-8, district baseball tournaments (sites given 
below) 

May 9-10, regional track meets (sites given in Feb- 
ruary issue of ATHLETE) 

May 13, regional golf tournaments (sites given below) 

May 17, State Track Meets 

May 20-21, Slate GoU Tournaments 

May 23-24, regional baseball tournaments (sites given 
below) 

May 23-24, regional tennis tournaments (sites given 
below) 

May 30-31, State Tennis Tournaments 

Jime 4-6, State Baseball Tournament 

In assigning schools to districts and regions for 
spring meets, the principal source of information is the 
blue statement form filed by the soh(X>l principal when 
he enrolls his school in the Association. If a coach is 
listed for a sport, it is assumed that the school sponsors 
a team in that sport. In some instances the coach of a 
particular sport may not liave been assigned at the 
time the statement form was filed, and in other in- 
stances the principal may have decided that a sport for 
which a coach was named will not be sponsored by the 
school this year. 

Principals should study the assignment of schools by 
districts and regions which appears below to detennine 
whether or not the listings for their sdliools are correct. 
The State Office siliould be notified only if the name of 
the scliool should be added to or omitted fixKn any of the 
lists given. 



BASEBALL 
Paducah Region 

Chrisrian County Di.stric; — Christian County, Daw- 
son Spring.s, Fort Campbell, Hopkinsville, Trigg Coimty 

Murray District — Benton, Qilloway County, Murray, 
Murray University, North Marshall, South Marshall 

Paducah District— Ballard Memorial, Heath, Reid- 
land, St. Mary, Paducah Tilghman 

Mayfield District — Carlisle County, CXiba, Farming- 
ton, Fulton County, Hickman County, Mayfield, Wingo 

Caldwell County District— C;ddwell County. Critten- 
den County, Fredonia, Livingston Central, Lyon Ctounty 
Greenville Region 

Henderson D '.strict — Henderson, Henderson County, 
Holy Name, Providence, Union County, Webster County 

CaneyviUe Dislrict — Butler County, Caneyville, Clark- 
son. Edjnonson County, Loitchfield 

Breckinridge County District— Breckinridge County, 
Fordsville, Hancock County, Ohio County 

Daviess County District — Davie.ss County, livermore, 
Owensboro, Owensboro Catholic, Trinity (WhitesvUle) 

Hughes-Kirk District — Bremen, Central City, Gra- 
ham. Greenville, Hughes-Kirk, Muhlenberg Central 

Madisonville District — Ciilhoun, Earlington, Madi.son- 
ville-North Hopkins, South Hopkins, West Hopkins, 
Sacramento 

Greensburg Region 

Bowling Green District— Bowling Green, Bristow, 
Franklin Simpson, North Warren, Richardsville, Uni- 
versity, Warren Central 

Auburn Di.strict — Adairville, Auburn, Lev\isburg, 
Ohnstead, Ru.s.sellville. Todd Central 

Glasgow District— Allen Countj', Glasgow, Hise\'ille, 
Park City, Temple HiU 

Tompkinsville District — Clinton County, Cumberland 
County, GamaUel, Metcalfe County, Tompkins\ille 

Ca\'erna District — Caverna, Oib Run, Hart County, 
LaRue County 

North Hardin District — East Hardin, Elizabethto\STi, 
EIizabo;htown Catholic, Flaherty, Fort Knox, Meade 
County, Noi'th Hardin, West Hardin 

Campbellsville District— Adair Coimty, Campbells- 
ville, Greensburg, Lebanon, St. Augustine, St. Charles, 
Taylor County 

Bardstown District — Baixistown, Mt. Washington, 
Old Kentucky Home, ShepheixisWlle, Washington Coun- 
ty, St. Catherine 

Jefferson County Region 

Pleasure Ridge Park District — Bishop Da\'id, Butler, 
Doss, Pleasure Ridge Park, Valley, Western 

Central District— .\hrens. Central, Flaget, Sha\\'nee 

duPont Manual District— duPont Manual, Louis\ille 
Country Da.\', Louisville Male, Trinity 

Southern District — DeSales, Fairdale, Iroquois, South- 
em, Thomas Jefferson 

Seneca District — Eastern, K.M.I. , Sene(3a, Waggener. 
Westport 

Atherton District — Atherton, Durrett, Fern Creek, 
Jeffersontown, St. Xa\'ier 

New-port Region 

Boone County District — Boone Coimty, Dixie Heights, 
Lloyd Memorial, St. Henrj', Simon Kenton 

Holy Cro.ss District — Beechw<x)d, Covington Catholic, 
Holmes, Holy Cro.ss, Ludlow 

Silver Grove District — Bishop Brossart, Campbell 
County, Highlands. St. Thomas, Silver Grove 

Grant County District — Grant County, Pendleton, 
Walton- Verona, Wilhamstown 

Newport District — ^BeUevue, Dayton, Newport, New- 
port Catholic 

Lewis County District — Bracken Coimity, Deming, 
Fleming County, Lewis County, Mason Coimty, Mays- 
ville, St. Patrick, ToUesboro 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH. 1969 



Page Three 



Lexington Region 

Franklin County District— Anderson, Frankfort, 
Franklin County, Georgetown, Scott County. Woodford 
County 

Harrison County District — Bourbon County, Harrison 
County, M.M.I. . Nicholas County, Paris 

Boyle County Di-strict— Boyle County, Danville. Gar- 
rard, Harrodsburg. Jessamine County, Kentucky Sdhool 
for Deaf, Mercer Coimty, Stanford 

Shelbyvillc District— Oldiiam County, Shelby County, 
Shelbyville, TaylorsviUe 

Casey County District— Brodhead, Casey County, 
Crab Orchard, Hustonville. Mt. Vernon. McKinney 

Eminence District — Carroll County. Eiminence, Gal- 
latin County, Henry Coimty, Owen County, Trimble 
Coimty 

Lexington District — Bryjin Station, Henry Clay, La- 
fayette, Lexington Catholic, Sayre, Tates Creek 

Richmond District — Beroa Community, Estill Coun- 
ty, Irvme, Madison, Madison Central, Model 
London Region 

Somerset District— Bumside, Eubank, Pulaski Coun- 
ty, Somerset 

Powell County District— Clay County. Hazel Green 
Academy. Jackson County, Lee County. Oneida Insti- 
tute, Owsley County 

Harlan District — Cumberland, Evarts, Harlan, James 
A. Cawood 

Whitesburg District— Carr Creek, Fleming-Neon, 
Hindman, Jenkins, Knott County. Riverside Christian. 
Whitesburg 

Hazel Green District— Bush. Hazel Green. Lily. Lon- 
don 

Russell County District- McCreary County. Monti- 
cello, Pine Knot, Russell County, Wayne County 

Middlesboro District — Barbourville, Corbin, Hender- 
son Settlement, Lone Jack, Middlesboro, Whitley Coun- 
ty, Williamsburg 

Leslie County District — Buckhom, Combs Memorial, 
Hazard, Leslie County, M. C. Napier 
Morehead Region 

Asliland Wstrict— Boyd County. Fairview, Holy Fam- 
ily, Louisa, Paul Blazer 

McKell District — Greenup, McKell, Raceland, Russell 

Montgomery County District— Bath County, George 
Rogers Clark, Menifee County, Montgomery County 

Morehead District — Breckinridge University, Carter, 
Hiitchins, Olive Hill, Prichard, Rowan County 

Paintsville District — Ezel, Johnson Central, Morgan 
County, Paintsville 

McDowell District— Betsy Layne, Martin, Maytown, 
McDowell, Prestonsburg, Wheelwright, Wayland 

Elkhorn City District— Belfry, E>orton, Elkhom City, 
Johns Creek, Millard. Phelps. Pikeville, Virgie 
GOLF FOR GIRLS 

Bowling Green Region — Bowling Green, EHzabeth- 
town, Glasgow, Greenville, Henderson County, Hopkins- 
viUe, Murray, Owensboro, Owensboro Catholic 

Frankfort Region — CampbeUsviUe, Frankfort, Frank- 
lin County, Highlands, Lafayette 

Louisville Region — Atherton. Owen County, Sacred 
Heart, Shelbyville, Waggener, Westport 

Winahester Region — London, Madison Central, Mays- 
ville, Middlesboro, Paintsville, Paul Blazer, St. Patrick, 
Tates Creek 

GOLF FOR BOYS 

Princeton Region — Benton, Caldwell County, Chris- 
tian County. Crittenden County. Fort Campbell, Fulton, 
Hickman County, Hopkinsville, Mayfield, Murray, North 
Marshall, Paducah, St. Mary 

Owensboro Region — Breckinridge County, Central 
City. Daviess County. Greenville. Henderson. Hender- 
son Coimty, Madisonville-North Hopkins, Meade County. 



Ohio County, Owensboro, Owensboro Catholic, Provi- 
dence, Union County 

Bowling Green Region— Allen County, Bowling Green, 
Elizabethtown. Elizabethtown Catholic. Fort Knox. Glas- 
gow, LaRue County, Lebanon Junction, Metcalfe Coun- 
ty, North Hardin, Russell vilie, Scottsville. Tompkins- 
viUe. University. Warren Central 

We^t Jefferson Region— Ahrens, Bishop David, But- 
ler, Central, DeSales, Doss. Flaget, Iroquois. Pleasure 
Ridge Park, Shawnee. Southern. Thomas Jefferson, Val- 
ley, Western 

East Jefferson Region— Atherton, duPont Msmual, 
Durrett, Eastern. Fern Creek. Jeffersontown. K.M.I.. 
Louisville Country Day, Louisville Male, St. Xavier, 
Seneca. Trinity. Waggener, Westport 

Covington Region— Beechwood, Boone County. Car- 
roll County. Covington Catholic. Covington Latin. Dixie 
Heights. Hohnes. Holy Cross. Lloyd. Ludlow, Owen 
County, Simon Kenton. St. Henry. Trimble County 

Campbell County Region— Bishop Brossart, Camp- 
bell County. Dayton. Mason County. Maysvnlle, High- 
lands, Fleming Cotuity. Pendleton, Newport. Newport 
Catholic, St. Patrick. St. Thomas. Silver Grove 

Frankfort Region— Bourbon County, Bryan Station. 
Clark Coimty. Frankfort. Franklin County. Georgeto\\Ti. 
Harrison County, Henry Clay. Lafayette. Paris. Shelby- 
ville, Shelby County. Tates Creek. Woodford County 

DanvUle Region— Anderson. Bardstown, Boyle Coun- 
ty. Campbellsville. Danville. Garrard County, Harrods- 
burg, Lebanon, Mercer County. Old Kentucky Home, 
Stanford, St. Augustine, Washington County 

London Region— Berea, Corbin. Cumberland. Har- 
lan, Irvine. James A. Cawood. Knox Central, Lee Coun- 
ty, London. Lyncli. Madi.son Central. Middlesboro. Mod- 
el, Somerset, Williamsburg 

Paintsville Region— Boyd County, Elkhom City, 
Letcher, Hazard, Holy Family, Jenkins, Johns Creek, 
Johnsim Central, Martin, Paintsville, Paul Blazer, Pike- 
vUle, Russell, University Breckinridge 

RIFLE MARKSMANSHIP 

K.M.I. . Louisville Male. McKell. Owensboro. Paul 
Blazer, Tliomas Jefferson. Western (Sinai) 

TENNIS FOR GIRLS 

Murray Region — Henderson. Henderson County. 
Holy Name. Hopkinsville. MadisonviUe-North Hopkins, 
Murray. Murray University, St. Mary 

Bowling Green Region— Bowling Green, CampbeUs- 
viUe, Cavema. Elizabethtown, Franklin-Simpson, Glas- 
gow. Owensboro. University 

LouisvUle Region— Atherton, Central. duPont Man- 
ual. Kentucky Home, LouisviUe Collegiate, Presentation 

West Jefferson Region — Angela Merici, Doss, Fair- 
dale, Holy Rosary, Iroquois, Loretto, Pleasure Ridge 
Park 

East Jefferson Region — Mercy Academy, Sacred 
Heart, Seneca, ShelbyviUe, Ursuline, Waggener, West- 
port 

Bellevue Region — Beechwood, Bellevue, Boone Coun- 
ty, Highlands, Lloyd Memorial, MaysviUe, Newport, 
Villa Madonna 

Richmond Region — Bryan Station. Hazel Green. Hen- 
ry Clay. Lafayette. Middlesboro. Paul Blazer, Sayre, 
Somerset, Tates Creek 

TENNIS FOR BOYS 

Murray Region — CaldweU County, Crittenden Coun- 
ty. HopkinsviUe. MadisonviTle-North Hopkins. Murray, 
Murray University, Paducah TUghman. St. Mary 

Bowling Green Region — ^Bowling Green. Cavema, 
Franklin-Simpson. Glasgow. Greensburg. Hart Memo- 
rial, Henderson. Henderson County. RossellviUe, Tomp- 
kinsviUe 

Fort Knox Region-— CampbeUsviUe, Elizabethtown, 
Elizabethtown Cathohc, Fort Knox, LaRue County, 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY mC-H SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1969 



Meade County, Ow-ensboro. Owensboro Ca.tholic, Shel- 
b>'\ille 

West JeEEerson Region— Bishop David, Butler, Doss. 
Fairdale, Iroquois. Pleasure Ridge Park, Southern, 
Thomas Jefferson. Valley. Western 

East Jefferson Region— Durrett. Eistern. Fern 
Creek, K.M.I. . Louisville Comitry Day, Seneca, Trinity. 
Waggener, Westport 

Lou:s\'ille Region— Atherton, Central, DeSales, duPont 
Manual, Flaget, Louisville Male, ShawTiee, St. Xavie.r 

Lexington Region— Br\'an Station, Franklin County, 
Georgetown, Henn- Clay, Lafayette, Mays\'ille, M.M.I. , 
Saj-re, Tales Creek, Woodford County 

"Belle\-ue Region — Beechwood, BeUevue, Boone Coun- 
t>', Covington Catholic, Covington Latin, Highlands, 
Holmes, Lloyd, Ludlow, Newport, Newqwrt Catholic 

Paohmond Region— Berea, Harrodsburg, Hazel Green. 
Model. Middlesboro. Mt. Sterling, Paul Blazer, Somer- 
set, Whitley County 



Baseball Clinics 

Each registered official, under the requirements of 
K.H.S.A.A. By-Law 29-3, is required to attend at least 
one rules interpretation clinic. A similar requirement 
for baseball coaches has not been written into Associa- 
tion regulations, but all coaches in the sport are urged 
to attend one of the 1969 meetings. 

The first official K.H.S.A.A. baseball clinic is sched- 
uled to be held on March 23. The hour is 2:30 P.M. The 
sites are as follows: Murray High School, HopkinsviUe 
High School, Caldwell County High School, Henderson 
County High School, Hughes-Kirk High School, Bowling 
Green (Reservoir Hill), Elizabethtown High School, 
CampbellsviUe High School, Unlversit>' of Louisville 
• Lincoln Building), Beechwood High School, Transyl- 
vania College (McAlister Auditorium), DamiUe High 
School, Som.erset High School, London High School, 
Letcher High School, Joiinson Central High School, 
Rowan County High School, Paul G. Blazer High School. 



KAPOS NEWS 
ATTENTION: Principals and Cheerleader Sponsors! 

Is your school a paid-up member of K.A.P.O.S.? If 
you are, and your school is the winner of your region, 
your cheerleader squad will be eli,gible to compete for 
the top award: Outstanding Cheerleader Squad in the 
State Tournament. 

Included in the packet that will be given (by the 
KHSAA) to each winner in the regional tournament 
finals wiU be a letter pertaining to cheerleaders. The 
letter will contain the information concerning the basis 
of selecting outstanding cheerleader squads, and vviU 
request that the principal send written confirmation 
that the cheerleaders of his school are being chaperoned 
by a well-qualified, school-approved adult. The name 
of the sponsor should be included in this confirmation 
letter and given to the KAPOS board member at the 
registration booth in the lobby of the Kentucky Hotel. 
Chaperones must room with or on the same floor with 
their squads. 

RegistraMon for Cheerleaders 

Please stop by the "Welcome Booth" in the lobby of 
the Kentucky Hotel to: 

1. Register your squad. 

2. Get your hotel room assignment 

3. Pick up your envelope which contains the KAPOS 
Handbook and other tournament information. 

Along with a KAPOS board member there will be 
high school cheerleaders on hand to assist you. They 
can bo identified by their hostess armbands. Feel free 
to ask them for help, and in turn they may seek you or 
your cheerleaders to be interviewed by one of the radio 
commentators. In order to make their task easier, we 



are asking that you register your seat, row and section 
number. A possible radio initerview is often missed be- 
cause the guides cannot locate the desired person in 
time for the interview. 

Hospitality Room 

May we remind all .sponsors and cheerleaders that 
KAPOS has a Hospitality Room, located in Freedom 
Hall. Besides the opportunity to socialize with friends, 
exchange ideas, and perhaps get help with your prob- 
lerns, you can have free refreshments. Be sure to reg- 
ister when you come to the Hospitality Room. 

State-at-Large and Stafe Tournament Champions 

Beginning with the District Tournaments, all squads 
tl:at are paid up members of KAPOS are eUgible to 
compete for the honor of representing that District in 
their Region. The winner from each Region is eligible 
to compete for the title of Champion-of-the-State-at- 
Large. 

Judging for the State-at -Large winner wiU take place 
at 8:30 A.M. on Friday in Freedom Hall. Admittance to 
Freedom Hall will be upon proper identification of each 
squad by the approved adult chaperon or sponsor. 

It is possible for the winner of the State Tournament 
to be also the winner of the State-at-Large. The judging 
instrument to be used for the State-at-Large competi- 
tion will be identical to the one used in the region. The 
instrument to be used for the State Tournament will be 
enc':«sed in the packet given out by the KHSAA officials 
to the respective winners of the 16 regions. 

Governor Nunn Declares Sportsmanship Week 

While every week should be Good Sportsman^iip 
Week, KAPOS has always tried to put special emphasis 
on being a good sport at State Tournament time. Being 
a good sport is part of being a good citizen. KAPOS 
doesn't believe that good citizens need to be reminded 
to exemplify good sportsmanship. However, it is espe- 
cially fitting at tournament time to remind all citizens 
that it is a privilege to be able to attend tbe games, and 
that each individual can contribute to the success of 
the tournament if he will abide by the KAPOS Sports- 
manship Creed proclaimed by Governor Nunn: 
Proclamation 

Whereas, the Kentucky' Association of Pep Organiza- 
tion Sponsors upholds all standards of good sportsman- 
ship as its aim; and 

Whereas, KAPOS believes that good sportsmanship 
contributes to the foundation of the democratic way of 
life tiirough the application of the Golden Rule; and 

WTiereas, KAPOS urges that the ideals of good sports- 
manship be practiced not only during this week but 
throughout the year; and 

Whereas, the" Kentucky High School Basketball Tour- 
nament will be held during this week and the majority 
of Kentuckians will be following the games; and 

Whereas, good sportsmanship is the obligation of all 
citizens, and Kentuckians need to be made aware of this 
responsibibty; 

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Louie B. Nunn, Governor of 
the State of Kentucky, do hereby proclaim this week as 
Good Sportsmanship Week in Kentucky, and urge all 
citizens of this state to uphold all standards of good 
sportsmanship not only during the tournament but at 
all times. 

Dates for Summer Cheerleader Clinics 

The Kentuckj' Cheerleader Association announces the 
ninth annual Summer Cheerleader Clinic. In order to 
give more individual help there wiU be two clinics and 
the enrollment wiU be limited. Over three hundred 
cheerleaders had to be turned away last year, thus we 
hope by having two clinics that we will be able to take 
everyone making application. Get your application In 
early! 

Dates: July 27-Aug. 1, Aug. 3-Aug. 8 

Brochures can be obtained at the KAPOS booth or by 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1969 



Page Five 



contacting Mrs. Grace Fragstein, Mrs. Milly V. Rodes. 
Mrs. Stella S. Gilb. 

Not* to All Administrators 

Many of you have responded to our SOS in releasing 
teaching personnel to assist with the many tasks neces- 
sary to keep this organization functioning effectively. 
Again, we need judges, hotel chaperones, and personnel 
to man boodhs at the hotel and at Freedom Hall. This 
involves at least 12 to 16 people. It is also back- 
breaking, tiresome work. However, we have many 
dedicated women who have indicated a willingness to 
help share tliese duties provided they get an OK from 
their administrators. Therefore, the KAPOS board is 
seeking your understanding and cooperatior, should you 
be asked to release a teacher from her duties to help 
carry on the work that KAPOS is doing to make oheer- 
leading a worthwhile educational experience in the 
State of Kentucky. 

Awarding of Trophies 

State Ghampion-at-Large: The winner will receive 
the Ted Sanford trophy while the runner-up will receive 
the Jane Meyer trophy. Ribbons will be given for hon- 
orable mention. These awards wiU be given during the 
halftime of the first game Friday afternoon. 

State Tournament: Winner, first place trophy; run- 
ner-up, second place trophy; honorable mention, nbbon. 
These awards will be given at the close of the final 
game on Saturday night. All cheerleaders are asked to 
wear their uniforms and to assemble in the KAPOS 
Hospitality Room during the halftime of the final game. 
All cheerleaders will then proceed to one of the end 
entrances where the winners will have easy access to 
the playing floor. 

Sponsors of the competing 16 cheerleader groups are 
asked to come to the floor with their squads. Besides 
getting the recognition you so well deserve, it is another 
way of letting the public know that oheerleading is im- 
{XJrtant enough in the school's curriculum to merit a 
well-quali lied ' ' sponsor-coach-chaperon . ' ' 

Scholarship Awards Total $2,500 

Miss Robina M. Becker, a graduate of duPont Man- 
ual High School, has been awarded the 1968 Educational 
KAPOS Scholarship. "Robin" is a freshman at the 
University of Kentucky. We are quite proud of her first 
semester scholastic record and pleased that, wliile she 
was not chosen for one of the four freshnian cheerlead- 
ers, she did survive the first cut. Robin, we are all 
pulling for you to make the varsity squad next fall. 

Scholarship applications may be obtained by writing 
Mirs. Stella S. GUb, University of Kentucky; Miss Jane 
Meyer, Shelbyville High School; or they may be picked 
up at the KAPOS booth at Freedom Hall. 
Stella S. Gilb 
Executive Secretary-Treasurer 



Minutes of Meeting 
K.H^.A.A. Gymnastics Committee 

The meeting was held Wednesday, February 26, 
1969, at 7:30 p.m. at the K.H.S.A.A. building. 

Members present: Theo. Sanford, J. B. Mansfield, 
Bai-ney Groves, Andy Hopkins (for Tom Mahanes), 
George Jefferson, Sheila Kuhlman, Terry Tune, Robert 
Wason, Bernard Johnson. 

Mr. Sanford reported that thirteen (13) additional 
schools have registered gymnastics coaches with the 
K.H.S.A.A. for the current year. 

At its last meeting, the committee had decided to 
hold the State Gymnastics Meet in Lexington on April 
5, 1969. Due to conditions beyond our control the com- 



mittee decided to have the State Gymnastics Meet in 
Louisville again this year with the iwssibility of moving 
it to Lexington in 1970. The tentative site is the Iroquois 
High School. 

On recommendation of the committee, Mr. Sanford 
appointed George Jefferson and Sheila Kiihlnian as co- 
managers of the state meet. 

It was decided that, since the meet will be held on 
April 5, and since the entry deadline is seven (7) days 
prior to the meet, the entry forms would be mailed to 
the schools approximately two (2) weeks before the 
deadline. 

The meeting adjourned at 9:00 p.m. 
Bernard M. Johnson 
Chairman, State Gymnastics Committee 



State Wrestling Tournament 

The 1969 State High School Wrestling Tournament 
was held at the Trinity High School (Louisville) on 
February 14-15. The North Hardin High School, with 90 
points, won the tournament for the second straight year. 
Ed Brandon of North Hardin was named the meet's 
"Most Outstanding Wrestier." The Seneca High School 
was second with 58 points, Trinity High School third with 
40 points. 

The tournament was managed by Wrestling Com- 
mittee Chairman Orville Williams of the Seneca High 
School. It was the sixth tournament sponsored by the 
K.H.S.A.A. 

Teams which scored finished in this order: l-North 
Hardin, 90; 2-Seneca, 58; 3-Trinity, 40; 4 (tie)-Fort 
Campbell and Newport Catholic, 38; 6-Flaget, 37; 7- 
Kentucky School for the Blind, 33; 8-Westport, 31; 9 
(tie)-Jeffersontown and Waggener, 23; 11-Woodford 
County, 22; 12-Campbell County, 20; 13-DanviUe, 17; 
14 (tie) -Oldham (Zounty, Pleasure Ridge Park and West- 
em, 9; 17-HopkinsviUe, 8; 18 (tie)-E:astem and Cald- 
well County, 6; 20-Frankfort, 4; 21-MiUersburg Military 
Institute, 3; 22 (tie)-Fem Creek and Ahrens, 2; 24-St. 
Xavier, 1. 

Medals were awarded to the first three places in 
each class. These winners were as follows: 

95 lb.— Mike Nolan, Newport Catholic; Randy Law- 
son, Jeffersontown; Robert Harkleroad, North Hardin 

103 lb. — Jim Whitehouse, Kentucky School for the 
BUnd; Bob Crawford, Jeffersontown; Jerry WeUer, 
Newport Catholic 

112 lb.— Doug Steger, Boone County; Arvil Meyers, 
North Hardin; James Von Dreele, Westport 

120 lb. — Tommy Nelson, Seneca; Charles Davis, 
North Hardin; Dennis Huber, Newport Catholic 

127 lb. — ^Dan Dickerson, Kentucky School for the 
BUnd; Mike Donlon, Flaget; Nick Barker, Danville 

133 lb.— Steve Johnson, Fort C^ampbeU; Dennis Kel- 
lems, Flaget; Lee Hehman, Newport Catholic 

138 lb.— Ken Welch, Flaget; Jeff Patoiquist, West- 
port; Alan Martin, Western 

145 lb. — Oiarles Roach, North Hardin; Skipper Tur- 
ner, Seneca; Rick Hancock, Trinity 

154 lb.— Dwight Williams. Seneca; Ray Crooker, 
Boone County; Lucky VerviDes, North Hardin 

165 lb. — Ed Brandon, North Hardin; Don Ledman, 
CampbeU County; Leland Stuart, Waggener 

175 lb.— Craig Kissel, Trinity; Barry Amyx, Seneca; 
Hartley Wilson, Woodford County 

Heavyweight— Jim Haek, Fort Campbell; Bemie 
Head, North Hardin; Larry Weathers, Woodford County 



Pago Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHCX)L ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1%9 



The Flying Dutchman 

On the wall of Commissioner Ted Sanford's outer 
office hangs "The Plaque of the Game Guys." Since the 
start of Ihe Game Guy Progr;mi in 19!9, a smaU en- 
graved plate witli the n;une of the new Game Guy is 
added each year. For the year of 1969 the engraved 
plate, which will be added to the "Plaque of the Game 
Guys'." will bear the name of Joseph R. Carey, an 
eleven-year-old lad who lives at SOo CarneaJ Road in 
Lexingion. This boy with the heart Of a lion will not be 
twelve years of age imitil July 19 but already he is set- 
ting the kind of fighting example which Kentucky wants 
for its other piiysically handicapped boys and girls. 

The first name plate on the "Plaque of the Game 
Guys" is dated 1949 and bears the name of Bobby 
KIrchdorfer who, though paralyzed from his waist 
down, engaged in sports, learned to compete and who 
today is one of the lop executives in a leading paint 
company in Louisville. Oral Miller's name was added 
in 19.t0 and today this blind Ashland boy is an attorney 
in Wa.shington, D. C. It would be interesting if Commis- 
sioner Ted would publish the entire list of the Game 
Guys from 1919 to 19G9. The Dutchman would then ha\-e 
Ehzabethtown's Howard Gardner do a study for The 
Kentucky High School AtWete, letting Kentuckians 
know where tliey are now and the degree of their suc- 
cesses. 

Here is the portrait of Kentuck-y's Game Guy of 
1969, Joe Carey, who had not even been bom when 
Bobby Kirchdorfcr's example of fight and determina- 
tion caused Kentuck>''s Game Guy Program to be 
spawned twenty years ago. The Dutchman's first salute, 
however, must go to Lexington's Director of Parks and 
Recreation, John Gettler, w^ho interested himself in 
young Joe Carey and encouraged Joe to do what polio- 
handicapped Bob Kirchdorfer did in Jefferson County. 
Coincidentally, at the time the program started in 1949, 
Johnnie Geltfer was on the Dutchman's Jefferson County 
Park and Recreation Staff and Johnnie had worked with 
the first Game Guy winner twenty years ago. Thus 
it is that Johnnie Gcttler has the rare pri\'ilege of being 
associated with the first Game Guy of 1949 as well as 
with Kentucky's newest — eleven-year-old Joe Carey, 
who now joins the "Proud Cawilcade of Kentucky's 
Game Guys" as it mo\'es into sports histoiy leaving 
footprints in tiie sands of time. Your spine has to tingle 
as you watch the ca\'a]cade. 

JOSEPH RICKY CAREY was born July 19, 1957, in 
Lexington, Kentucky. At the age of three months it 
was discovered that he had cancer and the amputation 
of his leg just below the knee was necessary. Joey's 
mother died on August 3, 1964, of cancer. Joey was 
seven years old at that time. He entered Arlington 
School m Septcjnber 1963 and attended Arlington until 
the fall of 196S at which time he entered Yates School. 
Last year Joey played in the little League as a right 
fielder and he is atso a member of the Yates Wildcats — 
a basketball team at Yates School. Joey has been a cub 
scout and at the present has made an application to 
become a member of the Boy Scout troop at Castlewood 
Christian Church. Joey hves at home with his father, 
Robert Carey, Captain, Lexington Pohce Department, 
and his grandmother, Mrs. Maude Carey, age 78, who 
has the same birthdate as Joey, July 19. His brother, 
Michael Carey, age 16 and a junior at Henry Clay High 
School, and his sister, Kathryn Carey, make up the rest 
of the family. 

Stand at attention, Kentuckians, when young Joe 
Carey is presented and be proud, Lexington, of a boy 
who has reflected honor and credit on the bluegrass of 
Kentucky. Of this you may be sure— the Carey family 




Joe Carey and Friends 

and Lexington Little League officials wiU be in Louis- 
\-ilIe in April to see their Game Guy honored. And here's 
somcthmg else. Bobby Kirchdorfer, who won tlie first 
Game Guy award in 1949, wiU also be there as the guest 
of the Fljing Dutchman, accompanied by his beautiful 
wife, Sandy. 

E\-ory Game Guy gets a pamphlet of poems collected 
by the Flying Dutchman. If you want these se\-en pages 
of poems, write the Dutchman, Box 36, Jeffersontown, 
and enclose a self-addi'es^ed. stamped en\'elope and 
jou'U get them by return mail. 

Now it's Basketball Tournament Time in Kentuck-y. 
Tliis week tlie Dutchman met with the Louisville Area 
Chamber of Commerce Sports Committee which sjwn- 
sors the annual hospitality program for the Schoolboy 
Classic. The Dutchman spawned the State Tournament 
HoipitaU'y Program idea many years ago and still 
works with the Chainber of Conmierce on this as a con- 
sultant. Y'ou will like what J. L. Miller, hospitality 
chaimian, has planned with Woody Dugan of the Louis- 
ville Area Chamber of Commerce. J. L. Miller (Jay) 
will be remembered by old Western alumni. His dad 
ran that pressing shop 'oy the old Student Inn in Bowling 
Green in Ihe late twenties and early thirties. Jay is one 
of the big success stories now in his executi\-e position 
\\":n the Graham Paper Company. For his unselfish 
ser\-ice as chairman of the State Tournament Hospital- 
ity Committee, J. L. (Jay) Miller wins the Corn Cob 
Pipe of Honor for the month of Marcli. 

The Dutclunan's cup ran over again when the Indiana 
High School Officials Association honored him on Feb- 
ruary 10. 1569, in IndianapoUs for fourteen years of 
seivice to the officials of Indiana and a lifetime honor- 
ary membership in the association. Some of the nicest 
guys live north of the Ohio River and two of the nicest 
are Phil Eskew and Herman Keller, who run the high 
school sports program in tlie Hoosier state. So the 
Dutchman closes out his lonj; and pleasant association 
with the Hoosier high schools. Just a short while ago 
his most happy sports acii\'ities with Harold Meyer and 
Paul Landis of the Buckeye High School Athletic Asso- 
ciation were closed out and last fall the Kentucky bas- 
ketball clinics were phased out. Maybe Grantland Rice 
was thinking about "phase out" time when he wrote: 
THE RECORD 

When the game is done and the players creep 

One by one to the League of Sleep, 

Deep in the night they may not know 

The way of the flight, the fate of the foe. 

The cheer that passed, the applauding hands 
Are stilled at last— but tlie record stands. 
The errors made, and the base-hits wrought; 
Here the race was run! There the fight was fought! 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1969 



Page Seven 



Yet the game is done when the sun sinks low 
And one by one from the field they go; 
Their day has passed through the Twilight Gates, 
But the scroll is oast and record waits. 

So take, my lad, what the Great Game gives, 
For all men die— but the record lives. 



Registered Baseball Officials 

(List Compiled March 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone unless otherwise designated. If two numbers 
are given, the firs number is that of the home phone. 

Adams, George David, Letcher, 633-7787 

Allison. Larry J.. Kennedy Heights, Carlisle, 289-2971 

Anders. Raleigh A., Route 6, Box 73-A. London, 864-6217. 

Corbin 528-1837 
Anderson. Kenneth N.. 861 Parkway Drive, Louisville, 637-1769, 

469-1501 
Anderson. Luther S., Route 2. Liberty Heights, Carlisle. 

289-2364, 233-2000 ext. 2548 
Asher, Ralph. Woodside. Box 232. Olive Hill. 286-4537, 286-2081 
Ashley. Kenneth. Science Hill. 423-3215, 679-1574 
Atwell. Darryl R.. 501 Sexton Court. Campbellsville. 466-6877. 

465-8736 . 
Ballenger. L. Edward. Route 1. Hanover. Indiana. 866-3651, 

866-2145 
Berger, John D.. Jr.. Locust Hill, Waynesboro. Va., 942-1422. 

942-4241 
Bertsch. Ronald L., 65 Geiger Ave.. Bellevue. 581-6790. 731-2012 
Bishop. Edward L.. 515 Wallace. Covington, 431-5203. 922-4080 
Biter. Charles D.. 6602 Moorhaven Drive. Louisville. 239-S680, 

462-4032 
Bosse William. 3306 Roger St.. Covington. 291-8765 
Bowling. Kenneth. P. O. Box 171. Harlan, 573-2401 
Brantley. Kenneth Larry. Box 117. Cumberland. 589-2064. 

689-4983 
Brown. Billy C. 105 Bluebird Ave.. Berea. 986-8235. 623-3541 
Browne. Jerome E.. P. O. Box 796, Calvevrt City. 395-4338. 

395-4600 
BushVar. John. 638 Monticello Blvd.. Lexington, 278-4670 
Butner. Billy M.. P. O. Box 616. Lancaster, 792-3503. 925-2711 
Callia, Herbert. 1646 17th St.. Bowling Green. 2-2348. 2-6361 
Calvert, Eston. Route 1. Berry. 234-1783. 234-1783 
Canter. John. 2826 Esther Blvd.. Louisville. 451-8218. 587-8862 
Carman. Coleman. Jr.. P. O. Box 110. Hardinsburg. 756-5280. 

766-2319 
Carr. Billy Wilson. 411 Longview Drive. Franklin. 586-6355 
Chambers Harold Eugene, P. O. Box 276. Edmonton. 432-2762, 

432-2131 
Charles. James B.. 15 Cook Ave.. Winchester. 744-5296. Lexing- 
ton. 255-7991 
Chinn. Clyde. 333 27th, Ashland. 324-5245. 325-4777 
Chumbley. Ron. P. O. Box 221. Jamestown. 343-9052. 866-2646 
demons. Glen C. 90 Allison Lane, Jeffersonville. Ind.. 282-7498. 

636-3711 
Cline, Roy E., 1194 Lincoln. Louisville. 637-8249 
Colvin. Dorce A.. 2408 Broadway. Catlettsburg. 739-5715 
Cornwell, James. 506 S. Main St.. Franklin. 686-4327. 586-4451 
Cottrell. David. 605 Shawnee Road. Danville. 236-3883. 236-7957 
Gulp. Willard E.. 318 Skyline Park Drive. Hopkinsville, 886-7967 
Daniels. Robert A.. P. 6. Box 2. Van Lear. 789-3931 
Davenport. James E.. 9810 Dawson Hill. Jeffersontown, 239-6667, 

454-7511. ext. 3765 
Davis. Bunny, 598 W, Lexington Ave., Danville. 236-2606, 

236-2606 
Davis. John F., 2704 Greenway Road. Ashland. 324-9748 
Day, Charles R.. 202 Marmak Drive. Glasgow, 661-3906, 434-2911 
Dean. Jerry W.. McKee. 287-7301. 287-7161 

Dickison. Ruddie L., Route 5, Box 180. Olive Hill 286-2194 
Dieterle. Owen M.. 538 Meadow Lane. Versailles 873-3746 
Downs, Charles. 2)9 Wells Ave., Owingsville. 674-2066. 674-2066 
Driver. Bob. 306 E. Main. Glasgow. 651-3841, 661-8761 
Druttman. George. Lavolette. P. O. Box 100, Wallkill, N. Y., 

TW 6-2605 
Duerson. William Robert, Route 2. Paint Lick. 926-2357, 

792-2459 
Durbin. Roy, 2911 Dale Ann Drive. Louisville, 462-1730, 

687-1121. ext. 266 
Dwyer. James E.. Jr.. 5020 Mile of Sunshine Drive, Louisville, 

964-6894 
Elliott. Billy Allen. 870S Terry Lane. Pleasure Ridge Park. 

937-4343. 935-1345 
Elliott. Carroll L.. 307 College. Elizabethtown, 765-4007, 765-6118 
Elmore. Jimmy A., Route 1, Brandenburg, 422-2465, 422-3214 
Emery. George. 234 Clay. New Albany, Ind.. 944-5267, 283-3B11, 

ext. 242 



Engle. William C. P. O. Box 46, Hindman, 786-6543. 785-5361 
Evitta. Harold E.. Route 167A, Luzerne Drive, Greenville. 

338-2970 
Eyl, Edward W.. Jr., 2252 Bradford Drive, Louisville, GL 2-1001, 

EM 6-9561. ext. 623 
Farrell. George A.. 6202 Casper Drive. Pleasure Ridge Park. 

935-4676, 776-1654 
Felix. Guy W.. 2405 Adams Ave.. Ashland. 324-2966, 324-8922 
Fenton. Don J., 4890 Oaklawn Drive. Cincinnati. Ohio. 271-3792 
Ferrell. Jimmy. 236 Kelley Drive, Glasgow. 651-8460 
Fish. Leland Gilbert. 826 Oak Hill. Lexington, 255-7156 
Fletcher, Curtis, Borderland. W. Va. 
Ford, Eddie L.. 102 Campbell Court, Mayfield. 247-4409, 

382-3400 
Frady. Claude Wesley, P. O. Box 88, Wayland, 368-2332, 

368-2332 
Frankel, Louis S.. 3723 Stanton Blvd., Louisville. 464-6519, 

454-6519 
Gaines, Curtis. 1514 Young. Henderson, VA 6-9933, VA 7-3537 
Gardner, Gary, Route 3. Magnolia. 628-2947, 528-2947 
Garland. Danny. 126 E. Second St.. Frankfort, 223-8608 
Gibbs. C. Richard. 2OV2 Boone, Winchester, 744-7584, Lexing- 
ton 252-0361 
Gibson, Robert R.. 202 Michigan Ave., Monticello, 348-2586, 

348-2686 
Giordano. Al. 107 Ratliff, Princeton, 365-5680, 365-6615 
Glass. Frank, 2004 Deauville. Lexington. 255-1798, 262-2312 
Goetz. Herbert, 35 Linet Ave., Highland Heights, 441-2825 
Goodman. Bennie R.. East View, 862-4638, 862-3924 
Gour, Bob, 218 S. Lee. Bowling Green. 843-9682, 842-0316 
Green. Freddie M.. Hickory. 247-6168 
Griffith, Edwin Dale. 2714 Lorraine St.. Ashland. 324-2497. 

324-1155, ext. 358 
Grimes. Herman L., Salem, 988-2193, 388-7662 
Hardin. Don G.. P. O. Box 88 Moreh.-ad. 784-7698 
Harjo. Austin Amos, 108 Airport Road. Clarksville, Tenn., 

431-3781 
Harper, Robie. Drakesboro. 476-8084. 476-8411 
Heaberlin, Bill. Washington Avenue. Flatwoods, 836-6915 
Hendrix. Jack. 415 S. Mill. London. 864-2075. 864-2331 
Hensley. Larry O.. 226 E. High St.. Lexington. 252-2493, 

299-1221 ext. 2117 
Hem. Junior. 3122 Charles. Ashland, 324-7202 
Hill. Clyde E., P. O. Box 117. Williamsburg. 549-2666, 649-1360 
Hilton. Billy. 323 Maplewood. Springfield. 336-7594 
Hina. Henry B.. Route 1. Sturgis. 333-5933. 333-4008 
Hinton. Henry. 1210 Witawanga. Lyndon. 426-7627, GL 4-7611 
HoUingsworth, Henry R.. Streets Avenue, P. O. Box 481, 

Elkon. 265-2340. 266-2545 
Hord. Ronnie D.. P. O. Box 74. . Campbellsville. 466-6871. 

465-8736 
Hounschell, Eddie L., Midway, 277-0693, 846-3301 
Hubbs. Cletus. 221 Sherwood. Hopkinsville, 885-8578. 886-3384 
Ingram, William, Det. C. 12th MP GP Co.. Fort Knox, 4-7455. 

4-7467 
Ireland. Jan L.. 1310 College. Bowling Green, 842-6708 
Jacobs. Bob. 3320 Lexington Road. Louisville. 896-6082 
Jacobs. Dorris R.. 254 Seminole. Paducah. 442-5233. 443-2461 
Jenkins. Ronald E.. 2116 Gregory Drive, Henderson. VA 7^546, 

VA 7-6666 
Johnson. Grayson. Hindman. 785-6178, 785-5350 
Johnson, James Maurice, 174 Pinehurst Drive, Frankfort, 

223-2822. 875-1636 
Jones. Frank, P. O. Box 718, Manchester, 698-2706 
Jones, Joe S.. 203 Green St.. Manchester. 598-3793, 598-2129 
Jump. Frank E.. 200 Elizabeth, Bowling Green. 842-8060, 

843-4707 
Kasperski. Harry W.. 3652 Fincastle, Louisville 451-1065. 

582-6215 
Kaufman. Alvin R.. 8216 St. Anthony Church Road. Louisville. 

366-0126. 687-0871 
Kays. Allie. Route 5, Box 75-B, Shelbyville, 63?-3203 
Keeling. Reuben. 3757 Ramona Drive Paducah. 442-4190 
Kennedy, James R.. 1686 Alexandria Drive. Lexington, 277-7828, 

258-9000. ext. 2141 
Kidwell. James S.. 1112 Parkway. Covington. 291-6856 
Kimmel Jerry, Beechmont, 476-2656, 476-2656 
King. James A.. 5000 Clarmar Road, Jeffersontown, 239-801B, 

778-2791 
Kinney. Charles L.. P. O. Box 36. McKinney 
Kinney. Dale, 411 E. Pleasant. Cynthiana. 234-1042, 234-1100 

ext. 248 
Kinney. Paul C, Route 2, Williamstown, 824-6140 
Kirk. Charles Floyd. Main Street. Benham. 848-2039 
Kouns. Robert. P. O. Box 682. South Shore, 932-4540. 932-332S 
Kraft. H. Nellis. 2606 Delor Ave.. Louisville. 637-8195. 584-4263 
Kuhl. Lawrence. Houser Lane. London. 864-6235. 864-4182 
Lamb. Paul W.. 427 Carlisle Ave.. Lexington. 265-4126, 255-6666 
landers John F., 32 Charlemagne, Clarksville, Tenn., 647-2656, 

798-3320 
Laskey. George 0.. P. O. Box M. Beattyville, 464-2609 
Laugherty. Kenneth Ray, 2100 Peabody Lane, Louiaville, 

451-1706, 584-1211 



T 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1969 



Ltigh. Eugene F.. 5'J6 17th St.. Corbiii. 528-1501, 528-1212 ext. 

35 
Lewis, Dennis, 519 N. 4th St., Bardstown, 348-9269. 348-5913 
Lewis. Lae V.. 103A 5th Ave., Cumberland. 689-4196 
Lindsey, Jack, Blackey. 633-5353, 436-4S97 

Lloyd, Birt Leonard, 4223 Auburn Road. Huntington, W. Va. 
Lovell, Monty Joe, 429 Oak St., Richmond. 623-1304, 623-491)9 
Lynch, Jack, 2231 Montgomery, Ashland, 325-2958 
McBride. W. Kenneth. 157 St. William Drive, Lexington, 

2G6-7786. 255-6666 
McKenzie, Robert L.. 1809 Chestnut St., Kenova, W. Va. 
McKinney, Adelle. 5th Fid Hospital, APO San Francisco, 96346 
McMillin, Larry L.. P. O. Box 178, Crestwood, 241-4731, 241-4458 
Markham. James R.. 2J69 Fontaine. Lexington, 266-3892 
Marlette, Ronald L.. 1004 Delia Drive. Lexington, 278-6374 
Marshall, Barry J.. 250 Mt. Tabor Road, Lexington, 266-3482, 

266-3482 
Marun. Roger K., P. O. Box 174, Park City, 749-8425, 749-2860 
Matc.ngly. Charles •Pete." 3813 Poplar Level Road, Louisville, 

469-5793. 459-6085 
Meredith, Denny E., Jr., 5530 Indian Oak Circle, Louisville. 

968-1793. 367-6411 ext. 216 
Meredith, Tlior.ias Louis, 7100 Kentucky Ave., Pleasure Ridge 

Park, 935-1272 
Metcalf. Ken, Route 3, MunfordviUe, 524-9704. 524-4651 
Milburn, Martin Craig. Route 3A. Springfield, 336-7092 
Mooneyhan, James H., 810 Henry St.. Franklin, 586-4989, 

586-4451 
Moore, Marvin, Normal Hall No. 9. Morehead 
Morgan, Richard. Route 6. Box 64. London, 864-6511, 864-5114 
Morse. Richard K.: 163 N. Deepwood. Radclilf. 351-3748, 624-4454 
Mulligan, J. T.. 427 Center, Erlanger. 341-5628. 341-5628 
Mullins. Arthur. Elkhorn City, 754-4041, 754-7981 
MuUins. Charles, 9001 Shelbyville Road, Louisville, 425-8115, 

425-8115 
Nash. Richard C, 1728 Queens Way Court, Owensboro, 684-7957 
Nash, Robert E., 4107 Pixley Way, Louisville, 969-6603, 969-5603 
Newland, William D.. Ma.n Street. Highland, Ohio. 784-4512 
Newton, Jerrv L., P. O. Box 244, La Center, 665-5329 
Ncland. Douglas, Stanford, 365-2609. 365-2619 
Nolan. Michael Bruce, 36 W. Morgantown Road, Bowling 

Green. 842-8978 
Norwood, Donald V., Route 6 Strawberry, Franklin, 586-5119, 

586-4636 
Norwood, Thomas R.. 811 Henry St.. Franklin. 586-3614, 

586-3541 
Omer, Harold G.. 150 N. Crestmoor, Louisville. 896-4170 
Orem, Dale Linton, 409 Chippewa, Jeffersonville, Ind., 283-8226, 

584-0371 
Pack. James E.. 1420 E. Second. Maysville. 564-6773, 742-3600 
Pack, James Ronald, Stambaugh, 265-4848, 789-5273 
Pardue. Israel L., 1U05 S. 2Sth, Louisville, 772-2488, 774-6431 
Pence, Jerry. Hillview Trailer Court, Lot 30, Bowling Green, 

843-1306 
Penner. Merritt O.. Jr., Route 4, Box 739, Manchester, 

598-3711 
Peterson. John, 506 S. Spalding Ave.. Lebanon, 692-3847 
Phillips, Douglas, Breeding 

Phillips, Thomas M.. Route 2, Box 474, Pikeville, 639-4162 
Pietrowski. Paul, 108 Bishop St., Corbin, 628-6391 
Pollock. Robert. P. O. Box 347, Irvington, 647-7512 
Prather. Vernon, Jr.. 408 E. Adair. Owenton, 484-5119 
Price, James E.. Liberty, 787-7296, 787-6323 
Quisenberry, James M.. 1900 Farnsley Road, Apt. 9, Louisville. 

448-6152, 366-0940 
Raines, J. W., 1117 Lebanon Road. Danville. 236-3380 
Ramey, Herb. Fal-mers. 784-4724, 784-7726 
Rash Lindell L.. P. O. Box 268, Mortons Gap, 258-5136, 

258-5362 
Reif, Harry F., P. O. Box 301. New Castle. 346-5284, 346-8421 
Richards. Ed, 6316 Gayle Drive, Louisville, 969-3484 
Richardson, Charles T., 115 Lakeside Drive. Bardstown, 

348-8970. 348-5913 
Ring, Bill, 481 Rookwood Parkway, Lexington, 299-7089, 

255-8492 
Rison, Johnny B.. 197 Third St.. Ravenna, 723-285? 
Robbins, Michael J.. 778 Jimae Drive, Independence. 366-2209. 

381-1880 
Roberts, Gerald V., Normal Hall No. 40, Morehead. 784-9286 
Roberts, Kenneth Gary, Route 1, Box 186, Crestwood, 279-6165, 

279-5165 
Rogers, Eldridge, 310 Talbert, Hopkinsville, 885-6571, 886-3921 
Boiler. Otis C, 808 Chambery Drive, Louisville. 895-6356. 

587-1121 ext. 396 
Royce. Walter L.. P. O. Box 71, Midway, 846-6143 
Salyer, Henry E.. 4817 Bluebird Ave., Louisville, 969-6371, 

634-1511, ext. 6071 
Sammons, John I.. 1105 Elm. Murray, 753-5738, 753-3642 
Sandusky, Jerry, Route 1, Box 155. Liberty, 787-7742. 787-7484 
Scott. W. L. "Bill." 1816 McDonald Road. Lexington, 278-2844, 

254-1313 



Sexton, Steven Carroll, 9126 Edmonson Terrace, No. 203. Green- 
belt. Md.. 633-7U4, 832-4220 
Singleton. Jim, 9017 Cinderella, Louisville, 964-0090, 366-9661 

ext. 532 
Sinkhorn. Richard D., Mitchellburg, 332-7748, 236-3315 
Smith, Wayne N.. 313 Beechwood, Campbellsville. 466-6268, 

".84 27.S1 (Columhin 
Smith. Willatd N.. 311 Beechwood Drive. Campbellsville, 

465-5339, 466-4191 
Smith. W. Jack, 203 Ohio, Somerset. 679-1211. 252-6602 
Snyder. Bernard L., 1253 E. Burnett Ave.. Louisville. 637-6389 
Staker. Robert, 1237 E. 2nd St.. Maysville, 664-4274 
Stephenson. Harry S.. 1612 Hawthorn, Lexington. 299-1767. 

233-8310 
Stethen, James E., P. O. Box 135, Bedford, 266-3285 
Strain. Richard P., P. O. Box 472, Radclitf, 351-4306, 624-1231 

( Fort Knox ) 
Strasburger. Charles R., Millwood, 879-6263, 697-2111 
Suhr, George. 663 Mix. Louisville, 637-6204 
Sullivan, Don Chris, 2083 Old Nassau Road, Lexington, 

277-6953. 277-6953 
Sullivan. Howard. Ill Evergreen. Lawrenceburg, 839-4177, 

S73-31S1 
Sullivan. William Howard, Lawrenceburg, 839-4177, 839-3061 
Swinford, James W., 5.502 Oak Creek Lane. Fern Creek, 

239-0055, 448-2761 ext. 222 
Taul, George. 126 W. Elder St.. Cincinnati, Ohio, 421-9662, 

541-7275 
Taylor. Ed. 435 N. 41st St.. Louisville. 772-0126, 584-6311 
Thomas. Bill, 3418 Burrell Drive, Louisville, 447-7621 
Tyre, Donald C. 316 Senate Drive. Frankfort, 223-3668. 

564-6612 ext. 244 (Lexington) 
Uriage. Richard. 822 Highland Ave.. Fort Thomas. 441-5513. 

471-8120 
Varble, William E.. 3108 Widgeon Ave., Louisville 
Var.jJr. Ray G.. 737 Kingston Road, Lexington, 299-4146 
Vincent, Jesse Charles. 308 Faii-view St.. Greenville. 338-4740 
Waller. Bobbie E.. 309 Strathmore. Lexington. 299-6123. 299-6123 
Washer, Jamie Don. 507 S. 7th. Murray. 753-5330, 763-6313 
Watts, Frank Cooper, P. O. Box 145. Bardstown, 348-3977, 

348-3363 
Webb. James Otis. 133 Main St., Horse Cave. 786-2869. 786-2869 
Wesche. James A., 1704 Chickasaw, Lexington, 299-8058 
Wickham, James R.. Jr.. 311 Cathedral Manor. Bardstown, 

348-5282. 833-4611 
Williams. Bobby, East View, 862-4664, 852-3924 
Williams. Robert Hanson, Route 1. Gracey. 886-4566 
Williamson. Junior. Lower Cline Street. Pikeville, 437-7171 
Winfrey. Shelby, 316 Sharon Drive. Campbellsville, 465-8392, 

465-8392 
Wingfiekl, Felix G., 1132 E. Parkway, Louisville, 636-2282. 

636-2282 
Wood. Thomas David. 1314 Rammers Ave., Louisville. 634-9334, 

587-8411 
Woosley. James R., II, Caneyville, 879-3375 
Workman. Bill. 3563 Floyd St., Ashland, 324-2886. 324-1111 

ext. 8448 
Wren, Bethel, Route 2, Paint Lick, 792-2751 
Wright. J. B., 1017 E. Main. Greenup. 473-7971, 473-9861 
Wyatt. William T.. 112 Bellvue. Bowling Green, 843-8098. 

842-9431 
Yewell. Morgan R.. Jr., 475 Flamingo, Frankfort. 876-2746. 

252-5535 (Lexington! 
Young. Danny L.. Route 1. Hawesville. 927-6313. 927-2641 
Zirnheld. Leonard. 9105 Blue Lick Road. Louisville. 969-5925 



Why Do Rules Change? 

(Continued from Page One) 

6. Codification. Basketball rules must be properly 
codified with related provisions for play and appear 
under a common heading. The current basketball rules 
are grouped under ten main headings and include such 
categories as: live ball and dead bail; free throw; defi- 
nitions; players and substitutes; violations; and fouls; 
etc. This permits easy reference by a student of the 
rules. 

7. Physical welfare. While the physical safety of 
players is not as significant in basketball as it is in 
football or wrestling, the rules must, and do, make 
safety ,provi,S3ons by free and unlimited substitutions, 
by liberal time-out arrangements, and by increasing the 
severity for penalties involving intentional and flagrant 
contact fouls. 

8. WorkabiUty. The provisions of a code must be 
practical to the extent that the game officials can apply 
and enforce them. The inclusion of provisions which 



I 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1969 



Page Ninf- 



cannot be enforced tends to reduce the effectiveness of 
tihe entire code and, therefore, must be avoided. 

It is, therefore, evident that it is necessary to keep 
the basketball rules up to date and progressive. This is 
done through the application of a philosophy and in an 
effort to keep the game progressive. To freeze the 
rules, even for so short a period as two years, has con- 
clusively proven that skills, strategies and techniques 
are developed soon to take advantage of any \'oid in 
coverage. Thinking coaches and players soon cause a 
set of rules which is not up to date to become com- 
pletely a.nd totally unsatisfactory in every respect. To 
be acceptable and to meet the need, the rules must be 
kept completely and totally up to date. 



Game Out of Hand? 

It is not unusual for the State Office to receive re- 
ports from coaches and athletic directors to the effect 
that the officials "let the game get completely out of 
hand." Each time such a report is received we wonder 
whether the officials should be called upon to accept 
the entire resp>onsibility. Who really lets a game get out 
of hand? Who is held responsible for unsportsmanlike 
acts on the floor or field? 

On this point, Association rules are quite clear. It is 
the responsibility of the schools and the school repre- 
sentatives to m;iintain the highest ethics of good atti- 
tudes and good sportsmanship. The officials can only 
inflict penalties and, if occasion demands, eject players 
from the game. This authority is not always enough to 
insure sportsmanlike attitudes. 

To be sure, a competent official, one who has the 
know-how and the courage to call a game the way it 
should be called, can sometimes by the sheer force of 
liis personality keep the game from becoming a brawl. 
Yet, there are situations where a coach must intervene. 
If a coach sees one of his players lose his temper or 
otherwise conduct himself in an unsportsmanlike man- 
ner, he should replace this player at the first opportu- 
nity. This should be done, not only to prevent the possi- 
bility of game deterioration, but because a player in this 
state will seldom play good ball and may cause his team 
to be penalized. Quite often a conference with the coach 
win cause the disturbed player to settle down and 
regain his composure after which he might be permit- 
ted to re-enter. If, thereafter, ihis conduct has not im- 
proved, he should be withdrawn permanently. No coach 
has the right to expect an official to serve as a discipli- 
narian. Instilling right attitudes and controlling the 
emotions of players under his direction remains the 
coach's prime responsibility and his precious privilege. 

The matter of keeping a game under control is the 
joint responsibility of the coach and the officials. The 
responsibility thus places coach and official on the same 
side. Any actions on the part of a coach which would 
indicate to the spectators that he must "defend and 
protect" his players against the officials is looking for 
cheap sjTnpathy and may be, furthermore, inciting a 
not. The official who is inconsistent, hesitant, inefficient 
and lacking in courage increases the problems of the 
coach as he tries to keep his players on an even keel. 
With coach and official presenfing a united front and 
giving the impression of working toward a common 
goal, no game should ever get out of hand. 

— Arizona Association Bulletin 



The Best-Taught Subject 

Someone once said that the best-taught subject in 
the American Iiigh school is football. Not only are the 
players given theory, tliey are also given hours of prac- 
tice in that theory. 

The standards are severe. Of a large school of aspi- 
rants, seldom more than 25 are chosen for the squad. 
And only one or two ever gain high recognition in the 
course of the four academic years. The final "examina- 
tions" are those difficult, glorious garner upon the 
field. 

For what advanced English class is the incumbent 
willing to go without sweets, refuse toh>acco and alcohol, 
limit his .social life in order to sleep his eight to ten 
hours? 

For what advanced biology is he willing to plow 
through sleet and roll in the mud and risk breaking 
legs and arms and nose and neck m order to perfect his 
skill and to acliieve success? 

For what advanced ;figebra is he willing to memo- 
rize signals and to learn plays as complicated and 
elegant as musical ornamentations in a Chopin prelude? 

Laden with the hot armorial gear, for what but 
scrimmage is he willing to give up all his golden 
autumn afternoons? 

Of course, there is the glamor of the game. There 
is the smoke curling from bonfires on the way to the 
field, the sjjice of autumn in the air, the hush of leaves, 
the sharp pleasure of homecoming. 

There is the hope of the scholarship and the AU- 
-American status some day. 

There is his school. 

There is the love fight in the eyes of all the golden 
girls. 

There is the rush of the field, the music, the chivalric 
b;mners flying, the hope3 all centered in a play, the 
exoiltation of the touchdown — aU other cares forgotten. 

One would be a fool not to see the glamor. But one 
would be a fool indeed not to see more. 

The young athlete lives these years of almost monas- 
tic austerity because he is proud of having been able to 
endure. The more difficult the ganie, the more strict 
the coach; and the more inclement the weather, the 
more he remembers those days of his youth, and the 
prouder he is of himself and of his game. 

Indeed, the more he has sacrificed, the harder he 
has worked, the more he is convinced that it was the 
game that developed his character, the game that made 
him a man, and the game that is proof of that man- 
hood. 

And, in a sense, he is right. It is his having endured 
and his having passed the test of the game that gives 
'hini his image and allows him to respect himself. Wheth- 
er his IQ is that of a Frank Ryan or of some general 
studejit in high school, it does not seem to matter. His 
involvement is the same. 

Football is the best-taught subject in the American 
high school because it is prot>ably the only subject that 
we do not try to make easy. We have watered down the 
social studies curriculum. Students do not even have to 
learn ancient history anymore. We have emasculated 
Engfish. 

We have stopped beheving in grammar (though 
"Grammar." as Moliere says in his Les Femmes 
Savantes, "knows how to control kings"). We have rele- 
gated composition to the flaccid permissive rule of the 
s{X)ken word from Madison A\-enue. We give short- 
stories instead of DeCoverley and undistinguished mod- 
em prose instead of the classics. Or we water down the 
classics. 

We attempt to make learning "interesting" and 
"fun." As a result, we have made it neither. The student 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 196f. 



has lost respect for us and for the subjects we teach. 
He wants to grow up; he does not want his life made 
easy. 

Football is the challenge he wants. Football fires his 
imagination. He identifies himself with the football hero, 
because it is in this image that he washes to see himself. 
He wants to have the opportunity of facing an adult 
world on its own terms: with courage, with endurance, 
with competence. 

In .short, he wants to work hard at something .so that 
he can respect himself. If he does not perform weU, he 
knows it, and he expects to be failed. If he performs 
well, he can be proud of himself. I have never known 
a student to point with pride at liaving passed an easy 
subject. 

The student also wants the world of ideas. He does 
not want, for example, to write compositions about 
"My Hobby" or "The Trouble With My Older Sister" 
or "A Problem I Am Havin.j; at Home." He wants to 
write about the iderts stimulated by the reading of great 
literature. He wants to be made to work and to think 
as hard in his academic classes as he is made to work 
and to think on the football field. 

If we can make tlie academic subjects as difficult, as 
challenging, as exciting, as adult as football, perhaps we 
can make them glamorous, too— so glamorous, in fact, 
that the student will now and then spend the lamplight 
over his books "because he wants to," 

We will never make academic subjects glamorous if 
we continue to emasculate the curriculum and demand 
of the student less than his very best. Let us have some 
mental scrimmage, too. 

We have tried for some 40 years to soften the blows 
of academic reality for the students in our high schools. 
The results ha\'e often been downright disastrous. Now 
is the time for a change, a time to learn from our mis- 
takes. 

I have heard very few educators say, "FootbaU isn't 
■imporlaiit," but I have heard them say. "Grammar isn't 
important." I once even 'heard a professor of education 
say, "Subject matter isn't important." 

This still shocks me after all these years. I think 
that it is high time that we began taking EngUsh and 
French and Latin and history and mathematics and 
chemistry and biology and physics as seriously, and for 
all our students, as we take football. 

I think it is time we got some pointers from the 
coaoh. 

"There are worse things in life than a tumble on 
heather, And life is itself but a game of football." — Sir 
Walter Scott, Song. 

Dorothy J. Faman 

Erasmus HaU H. S., New York 

(Minnesota Bulletin) 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 

REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled March 1.) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone unless otherwise designated. If two numbers are 
given the first number is that of the home phone. 

Bley. Richard V.. 3139 Pershing Ct., Cincinnati, Ohio, 481-3612. 

421-,5700, ext. 357 
Conn. Delano, Martin, 285-3645 
Grooms. Soger C. 7635 Forest. Cincinnati, Ohio, 232-0024, 

231-3600 
Fugate, Johnnie. P. O. Box 334, Hindman 
Markl.-iy. George, 3S6y Matson Ave., Cincinnati. Ohio, 791-2052, 

251-4100 
Turner. Bruce, 1456 High St., Paris. 987-2713. 987-9030 
Willis. Herbert Joseph, Route 1, Fort Branch, Ind., 753-7091 



The "Now Generation" 

Young people in .America today are looking for expe- 
rience and immediate opportunities for accomplishment. 
One hears often of the inclination for action that moti- 
vates our youth. Patience with the status quo, once a 
virtue, is now the stigma of the age. De\'elopment for 
the future, to many, is an experience of questionable 
value, because young people want fulfillment of their 
ambitions and opportunities for some kind of successful 
involvement right now. Working for better days tomor- 
row no longer serves to justify our activities. 

Schools, troubled as they must be with this shift in 
the direction of young attitude development, have in 
their hands the opportunity to present today's youth 
widi some of those significant, satisfying, concrete 
e.xpressions of involvement which are so desired. If all 
of us who work with school programs would only pause 
and look at the established system of interscholastic 
acti\1tics with a critical eye for one moment, some 
would surely see that for years, the answer to today's 
needed fuiiilLment has been on the side of the activities 
coin that was face dowTi — always there, but unseen. 
Essenvially, it has been ignored, or at least minimized 
in importance. Perhaps now is the time to turn that 
coin over and carefully examine its other face. 

Writers and speakers have repeatedly told us that 
schools needed strong acti^'ity programs to point stu- 
dents toward future social involvement, and schools 
have dutifully placed a major emphasis on such objec- 
tives. Athletics has long developed character, sports- 
manship, the sense of fair play, leadership abilities, 
teamwork, etc. Speech, music, and student government 
activities have been the academic landmarks which not 
only have given a respectable intellectual justification 
for scholastic activities, but also ha\"e sen'ed to pro- 
vide the same development opportuniues for the non- 
athlete that interscholastic athletics has given his 
sports-talented counterpart. This emphasis has served 
us well. Students have participated, learned, developed, 
and gone out into the world, trained for the future as we 
had planned. 

But now, turn that activities coin over. For all those 
same years, most of us have neglected to realize that 
participation in interscholastic activities gives a degree 
of immediate accomplishment and success which cannot 
be matched by any other kind of experience. Few of us 
have realized that when a student vians a medal, or 
earns a letter, or has his picture in' the paper as team 
captain, or clarifies the winning argument in that all 
important debate, or is elected class representative, or 
doesn't miss a note and helps the band get a superior 
rating, or has any other kind of success in the school's 
programs, he has, at that moment, ex-perienced success. 
He has fulfilled a very significant part of his life now. 

On most of those occasions, we have smiled and 
said, "That wiU really look good on your records for 
college entrance." Rarely did we reaUze that those mo- 
ments were far more important to that individual than" 
all the lessons in being a good loser, the chances for 
developing his leadership abilities, or any of the other 
long-range benefits which we saw in school activities. 
He cared most of all that he was successful. Too often, 
we didn't. 

And so today's student identifies success with the 
recognition of his peers because they think he and his 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1969 



Page Eleven 



STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 



Freedom Hall 



March 26. 27, 28 and 29, 1969 



PROGRAM OF EVENTS 
TWO INFORMATION AND RECEPTION DESKS— 

(1) Kentucky Hotel Lobby 

(2) Freedom Hall 

Hours 10:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. Wednesday 

9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Thursday and Friday 
10:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Saturday (Freedom Hall Only) 

NOTE: ALL STUDENT HOSPITALITY BADGES .WILL BE ISSUED AT 
THESE PLACES DURING THE HOURS SHOWN. 

HOSPITALITY PRIVILEGES INCLUDE— 

•Basketball Playground in West Wing of Freedom Hall 

Hours Wednesday through Friday 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. 
Saturday 2 :00 p.m. to 5 :00 p.m. 

•SPECIAL TEENAGE MOVIE— OHIO THEATRE 

(Special price of 50c also applies Wednesday-Thursday before 5:00 p.m.) 

•Two Teen Dances — Downtown, Convention Center 

Thursday night — 10:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m. 

(Dance to the music of SOUL, Inc. M.C. will be a WAKY Disc Jockey) 
(Dance to the music of Elysian Field. M.C. will be Bill Bailey of WKLO) 
Friday night — 10:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m. 
TICKETS $1.10 PER PERSON— ON SALE AT THE DANCE ONLY. 

•HOSPITALITY ROOM — For cheereleaders of participating teams. Cheerleaders should register 
with K.A.P.O.S. 

•H0SPIT.4LITY ROOM — For those listed below. (Admission passes have been mailed) 

Basketball Coaches Asst. Basketball Coaches 

Special price of Milk to stndents^S cents at Freedom Hall. 

PASS GATE FOR OFFICIAL CARS— Gate 2 (right at entrance) — off Crittenden Drive (To 
ease traffic congestion, all other cars should use main entrance off Watterson Expressway at 
Standiford Field.) 



General Chairman of Hospitality Committee 
J. L. MILLER, GRAHAM PAPER COMPANY 



Hospitalitv Program Coordinator 

WOODY DUGAN, Staff, Promotion 

LOUISVILLE AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



accxxmplishments are important. It means far more to 
him to have an approving nod from "his group" than it 
does to win a medal or see his name in the paper. And 
"Ins group" does not always consider the developmental 
values side of our activities coin. 

"His group" wants recognition, satisfaction, and 
even gratification now, because it has found no happi- 
ness in ithe long-range goals we have primarily sought. 

So where do we stand? Are school activities bad 
today because they have missed a significant opportu- 
nity? Are they passe because today's students would 
rather achieve now than develop for achievement later? 
Are theiT values to be negated because there is a general 
feeling of apathy and unconcern for the traditional objec- 
tives they have sought to achieve? 

No! No one can say that school activities are dead. 
They are even more important and valuable today than 
they have ever been. But if young people's needs are to 
be met through school activities, our activity programs 
must focus shaiply on accomplishment in the present. 

Let us see to it that school activities do not lose the 
perspective of the "Now Generation." 

—Albert Willis 
Illinois High School Association 



Intimidation of Officials 

Intimidation of officials is practiced or attempted in 
many sports, but it is mast prevalent among basketball 
coaches in the coUegiate areas, where a coach's job 
depends upon his winning percentage. The trouble is 
that the punitive action in the rules governing bench 
conduct is not applied by the men most maligned — ^the 
officials themselves. Most of the wihastle-tooters let col- 
lege coaches gat away with gross miscxxnduct on the 
bench or sidelines. 

The rules are specific enough. "Any rising from the 
bench or use of other gestures by a coach or other bench 
personnel which, in the opinion of the official, may indi- 
c£ute an attempt to influence his judgment or express 
dissatisfaction rath a decisian, is subject to penalty." 
That's clear enough, isn't it? Yet officials are loath to 
impose a technical foul penalty on coaches who oon- 
sftantly try to sway the judgment of the officials with 
blatant criticism from the bench, or who leap up and 
express their dissatisfaction with gesitures that can't be 
misinterpreted, 

Triite though it is, the coaches repeatedly remark: 
"The creaking wheel gets the most grease." They 
mean, of course, that the m,ore squawking about ded- 



ll 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLKTE FOR MARCH, 1969 



In Stock for 
Immediate Delivery 



FIrsf-ald Supplies 

A.B.A. Cold Tablets 

Adhesive Tape 

Alcohol 

Am Caps 

Anagrestic Liniment 

Ankle Brace 

Ankle Weights 

Ankle Wraps 

Aspirin 

Athletic Liniment 

Athletic Soap 

Ath-0-Gesic 

Atomic Balm 

Atomic Rub-Down 

Band Aid 

Batter's Rosin 

Bike Tape 

Black Magic 

Body Powder 

Butterfly Tablets 

Carbonate Stick 

Cotton 

Cotton Applicators 

Cramergesic 

Dextrotabs 

Dial-A-Tab 

Dry Smelling Salt 

Elastic Wraps 

Elbow Pads 

Felt 

Firm Grip 



First Aid Kits 

Foam Rubber 

Foot Ointment 

Foot Powder 

Foot Solution 

Fung-o-3pray 

Gauze 

Glare Guard 

Instant Ice 

Iso-Quin 

J & J Cream 

J & J Tape 

Kleen Ball 

Knee Braces 

Knee Pads 

Tape 

Tape Remover 

Tongup Depressors 

Towels 

Training Kits 

Tuf-Skin 

Vitamins 



Foofball Equlpmenf 



Ankle Braces 
Ankle Weights 
Arm Pads 
Bleachers 

Blocking Drumming 
Center Bars 
Chain Sets 
Charging Sled 
Chin Straps 




ATHLETIC & 

SPORTING <3OO0S 




106-110 North Race Street 
Glasgow, Kentucky 



Write for 1968-69 school catalogu* 



sions they make, the more apt the offidaj is to swing 
his calls in their (the coaches) favor. This is mainly a 
play upon the subconscious. Referees don't deliberately 
alter their patterns of calling fouls or violations, but 
they can be swayed by constant bickering from lihe 
bench. 

Give It to Them Quickly? 

Some strong basketball officials gain control of both 
players and coaches by strictly enforcing the rules, in- 
cluding bench conduct, right from the opening whistle. 
They will slap a technical on any coach. They are confi- 
dent itheir interpretations are accurate, and they won't 
abide rowdy behavior on or off the court. These men 
gain the respect of even the meanest and most vitupera- 
tive coaches. But these officials are rare. 

Then ithere's the other kind of official, the one who 
accepts abuse from the side lines and allows his judg- 
ment to be swayed by the scathing remarks of the 
coach. Perhaps he needs the money, or he actually is 
not aware that his decisions don't follow his usual pat- 
tern. But the weak official is by far more prevalent in 
the college sphere than the strong one. 

Yet the beleaguered officials take abuse every year. 
The coach with an ulcer just won't sit down. He views 
almost every call that goes against his team as an error 
in interpretation. No official is dnfallible. But most of 
them, a very high percentage of those I know, make 
honest calls. Yet even these honest officials are swayed 
by pressure, albeit their reaction is subconscious. 

Maybe there's nothing that can be done to straighten 
out the situation. But castigation of officials by some 
coaches should not be tolerated. The onus is on the 
coaches. The coaches are men responsible for the way 



the game of basketball is played, for their own and their 
players' conduct, and for the destiny of the sport. Treat- 
ing game officials like enemies isn't helping a bit. And 
the official also should take stock of himself. Is he 
rabbit-eared? Does he allow the noisy coach or crowd 
to color his calls? Both sides have tremendous responsi- 
bilities. Let's make basketball a better game to watoh. 

— Paul Horowitz 
Newark Evening News 



STATE TOURNEY TIME 

The magic spell is in the air. 
The din of battle's near; 

The toss, the tip, the shout goes up, 
State tourney time is here. 

The "Sweet Sixteen" have made the trip 
In search of schoolboy fame, 

To grab the headline banners bold 
Of how to play the game. 

From goal to goal along the boards 
They bounce the leathered sphere; 

Play man to man or in the zone; 
Conserve the time so dear. 

They sight and fire and pray a bit 
To hear the swish of net. 

Exult and smile when aim is true; 
When not, break out in sweat. 

It's madness, yes, but who would trade 
This scene for other clime? 

There's none to rival old Kaintuck' 
When it's state tourney time. 

—Elmer Kelley 



IF YOU ARE NOT USING OUR STUDENT COVERAGE 
NOW, A FEW MINUTES SPENT IN COMPLETING AND 
COMPARING THE CHART BELOW WILL SHOW 
WHETHER YOU SHOULD CONSIDER OUR POLICY 
FOR THE COMING YEAR. 



PRESENT OUR 
POLICY POLICY 



1. Accident Medical Expense Benefit — Maximum 

2. LimH for calls at doctor's office? 

3. Limit for X-rays or negative X-rays? 

4. Limit for Dental Expense, per tooth? 

5. Scheduled Surgery Benefits? 

6. Private Tutoring Benefit? 

7. Benefits payable regardless of other insurance? 

8. Coverage available on 24-hour basis? 

9. Available to employees? 

10. Does policy cover Athletics, except Football? 

11. Is Football Coverage available? 

12. Is policy approved by KHSAA? 

13. Is Claim Service prompt and is an interest shown 
in your special problems? 



$8,000 

NO 

NO 

NO 

NO 

YES 

YES 

YES 

YES 

YES 

YES 

YES 

YES 



NOTE: Items 2 through 5 provide for payment of reasonable 
and customary charges for services rendered. 

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KNOW MORE ABOUT THESE 
COVERAGES, WE WILL BE HAPPY TO CALL ON YOU. 
JUST LET US KNOW. 



^Ae /^iH^aeM C<yKp>aHS^ general agent 



W. E. KINGSLEY 



121-123 LAFAYETTE AVI2JUE 
P. O. BOX 7100 



J. E. McCREARY, M^. 
Life Department 

LEXINGTON, KY. 40502 



CHARLES C. PRICE 
PHONE 254-4086 



K.H.S. A. A. TOURNAMENT DIRECTORS 

District and Regfional Tournament Directors can get all of their supplies 
and needs to run a tournament from Hunt's. We have the merchandise 
listed below in stock for immediate shipment. Call or write us your needs. 



BASKETBALLS 

Get the feel of a basketball same as will be used in the State Tournament in 
Louisville, and in your District or Regional Tournament. We have all 
brands. 



f^' 



ADMISSION TICKETS 

Complete stock of admission tickets, 2,000 tickets to the roll numbered con- 
secutively. Printed ADULT, STUDENT, and ADMIT ONE. $1.50 per roll 
of 2,000. 

TROPHIES AND AWARDS 

We can take care of your Sportsmanship trophies, individual charms for 
All-Star teams, etc. Our stock is complete and we can engrave in our store 
and ship to you at once. 

ACCESSORIES 

Nets, scorebooks, first-aid supplies, whistles, stopwatches, timers' horns, 
powdered rosin, bath towels, shoe laces, colored top sweat socks, carry-all 
bags. All of this merchandise in stock for at once delivery. 

BANKS AND GOALS 

We have a complete stock of fan-shaped steel, fan-shaned and rectaneular 
glass backboards complete with goals and nets in stock for at once delivery. 
A phone call will get them off to you at once. 



FAIR-PLAY ELECTRIC BASKETBALL SCOREBOARDS 

We have IN STOCK the Fair Play Tick-A-Way Scoreboard ready for imme- 
diate shipment. A call will get one to your gymnasium before tournament 
time. 

Turn all of your needs over to us. We will be glad to handle them for you. 
ROY BOYD, JIM MITCHELL, WADE BURLESON or C. A. BYRN, JR. 

are always ready to assist you in every way possible. 

If you want the BEST QUALITY and the BEST SERVICE contact HUNT'S 

HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO., INC. 

CH 7-1941 — PHONES — CH 7-1942 

MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 
PHONE 459-6366 LOUISVILLE, KY. 



We Ship'The Da/~Vou BuV 








H'lqhkhoolAthMe 



CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL TEAM 
K.H.S.A.A. CHAMPION— 1969 




(Left to Right} Kneeling In Front: Bullard, Epps, Petty, Dryden, Ralston. Second Row: Coach 

Graves, Mgr. Baker, Montgomery, Walker, King, Morton, Stames, Tillman, Brooks, Ass't 
Coach Gordon, Mgr. Herd. 

District Tournament Games Won Regional Tournament Games Won 

Central 14«-47 ... Portland Chr. Central 101-46 Valley 

Central 69-41 Ahrens Central 88-64 Southern 

Central 68-57 Shawnee Central 57-53 Thomas Jefferson 







Official Organ of the 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

April, 1969 




OHIO COUNTY— RUNNER-UP 
1969 STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Thomas Jessie, Charles Henderson, Gary Nanney, Everett Taylor, Gary 
Raymond, Brad Whitehead. Second Row: James Geary, Jerry Duncan, James Harris, Robert Chinn, 
Michael Nance, James Earl Ralph, Patrick Gillstrap, Kim Bennett. Third Row: Ass't Coach Kenny 
Baughn, Donald Hazelrigg, Joe Shepler, John Parker, James White, Russell Snodgrass, Anthony Ab- 
ney. Coach Ralph Underhill. 

MAYTOWN— SEMI-FINALIST 
1969 STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 




(Left to Right) Frpnt Row: Keith Frasure, mascot. Second Row: Coach Gene Frasure, Keith Hicks, 
David Gibson, Randy Click, Jakie Halbert, Tom Stewart, Edwin Stewart. Third Row: Billy Joe Cau- 
dill, Jerry Dean Hicks, Jim Stewart, Rodney Hicks, Patrick Tallent, Jeff Stewart, Mike Bailey, Greg 
Halbert, William Allen. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXXI— NO. 9 APRIL, 

NEWLY ELECTED BOARD MEMBERS 



1969 



$1.00 Per Year 




Robert G. Fiser Lee T. Mills 

Prdn. Robert G. Fiser of the Crittenden County High 
School and Supt. Lee T. IMiUs of the Frankfort Indepen- 
dent Schools will represent Sections 1 and 6 respectively 
on the Board of Control for a four-year period, begin- 
ning July 1, 1969. 

Bob Fiser is a native of Benton, Kentucky. In 1942 
he received has B.S. degree from Murray State Univer- 
sally, and in 1950 he received Jus M.A. degree from fJie 
University of Kentucky. After finishing at Murray, he 
served in the Navy for three and one-half years. He 
spent the last fourteen months of his service on sea 
duty in the South Pacific. Upon returning from the 
Navy, he began his teaching and coaching career at 
the Trigg County High School. 

Beginning in 1950, Mr. Fiser held the position of prin- 
cipal and coach at the Brewers High School, and later 
he was superintendent and coach at Mounds, Illinois. 
Prior to his nine-year term as principal at the BaUard 
Memorial High iSchool, he held the same position at 
Mayfield. He has been in his present position since 
1967. He has coached a total of ten years in basketball, 
football, and track. 

In 1943 Mr. Kser married the former Miss Dekna 
Smith. The Fisers have two children. Their son, War- 
ren, is meirried, and is a chemist at Calvert City. Their 
daughter, Peggy, is married, and lives in Mayfield. 

Tom MiUs is a native of Pineville, Kentucl<y. At the 
PinevUle High School he played football for four years, 
basketball for two years. He was in the Navy during 
the 1951-54 period. He graduated with a B.S. degree from 
Eastern Kentucky University in 1957, receiving his 
M.A. degree from E.K.U a year later. He has had addi- 
tional work in Administratdon at the University of Ken- 
tucky. 

Mr. Mills coached football, basketball and baseball 
at the Perryville High School during the 1958-60 period. 
He was principal at the Stanford High School for four 
years, beginning in 1960, and was principal at Ihe Har- 
lan High School during 1964-65. He was principal at the 
Frankfort High School 1965-68. 

Mr. Mills is a member of the First Baptist Church 
of Frankfort, and of 'the West Frankfort Kiwairis Club. 
He holds membership in various educational associa- 
tions at .the local, state, and national levels. He is mar- 
ried to the former Miss Betty Howard of Pineville. The 
Mollses have four children. Tommy, 13; Randy, 11; 
Jennifer, 8; and David, 6. 



1969 Annual Meeting 



This issue of the ATHLETE went to press just prior 
to the time of 'the annual meeting of the Assodatifin. 
The business meeting of the K.H.S.A.A. was scheduled 
to be held on Thur.^ay, April 10, at 2:30 p.m., in the 
Crystal Ballroom of the Brown Hotel, Louisville. "IVie 
dinner meeting was to foUow at 6:00 p.m., and was to 
be held at the same place. Ath. Dir. HaiTy Lancaster 
of the University of Kentucky was scheduled to be the 
principal speaker at the dinner meeting. 

As provided in Article IX, Section 1, of the K.H.S.A.A. 
Constitution, the following changes in the Constitution 
and By-Laws were to be acted upon by the Delegate 
Assembly: 

Proposal I 

The Board oi Control proposes thait the following 
paragraph be added to By-Law 36: "The Kentucky 
School for the Blind, in competition with similar schools 
in other states, may compete under the eligibility rules 
of the Nonlh Central Association of Schools fcur the 
Bhnd." 

Proposal II 

The Board of Control proposes that By-Law 7-2 be 
amended to read as follows: "Any student using insult- 
ing language to another player or to an offioial in any 
interscholastic contest or who has been ruled out of such 
a contest because of foul tactics, shall be disqualified 
from athletic competition until reinstated by the Com- 
missioner. The name of the player shall be reported 
immediately to the Commissioner by the principal of 
the school which that player attends. When an official 
disquaUfies a player, he shall report the disqualification 
to this principal or his representative. If the Commis- 
sioner finds upon investigation that the offense was 
suffidentiy serious, the offender shall be permanently 
dasqualitied." 

Proposal III 

The Board of Control proposes that By-Law 1-7-a be 
amended to read as follows: "If any school plays an 
ineligible player, when the facts were available and 
could have been known upon such investigation as a 
principal is expected to make in the case of each of his 
players, that school shall be suspended from the Asso- 
ciation or otherwise penalized." 
Proposal IV 

The Board of Control proposes to amend the last 
sentence of By-Law 8 by omitting "softbadl" and "bowl- 
ing," and adding "gymnastics," "wrestling," and "rifle 
marksmanship. ' ' 

Proposal V 

The Board of Control proposes that the second para- 
graph of By-Law 29-3 be amended to read as follows: 
"The head coach in football, basketball and baseball 
shall attend one clinic in the sport involved." 
Proposal VI 

The Board of Control proposes that the last clause 
of By-Law 29-4-b be amended by addii^ "or six base- 
ball"; and ithat the last sentence of By-Law 294-c be 
amended by adding "and/or twelve first team high 
school baseball games." 

(Continued on Page Eght) 



F^ge Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APPUL, 1969 



VOL. XXXI— NO. 9 APRIL, 1969 

Published monthly, except Jane and July, by the KentDcky 

Higrh School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexine:ton. Ky. 40501 

Second class postage paid at Lexington. Kentucky. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Auiatant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 

BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Preston Holland (1965-60). Murik^ 

Vice-President Ralph C. Dorsey <1966-70), Horse Cave 

Directors — W. H. Crowdus (1968-71). Franklin; Morton Combs 
(1968-72). Carr Creek: Don Davis (1967-71). Independence; 
James T. Dotson (1968-72). Johns Creek; Ot>n R. Rawlings 
(1965-69). Danville: Foster J. Sanders (l!>66-70). Louisville. 
Subscription Rate $1.00 per Year 



zfiom the C< 



ommissionei s 



Off. 



ice 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1968-69 Basketball Participation List 
(Eligibility) 

2. School's Report on Basketball Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Basket- 
ball) 



Baseball Area Leaders 

K.H.S.A.A.-traJned area representatives in baseball, 
who are currenUy conducting clinics for coaches and 
officials and who are assisting witli registration of new 
officials, are rendering a fine service to the Associa- 
tion. The names and addresses of these men, with the 
residence and business phone numbers (residence num- 
bers given first), are as follows: 

W. P. "Dub" RusseU, 1112 Eim Street, 
Murray, 753-8722, 753-5125 

Cletus Hubbs, Hopkinsville High School, 
HopkinsviUe, 685-8578, 886-3384 

,41 Giordano, 107 Ratiiff, Princeton, 
365-5680. 365-5615 

Curtis Gaines, 1514 Young Street, 
Henderson, 826-9933, 827-3537 

Jerry Kimmel, Beechmont, 476-2656, 
476-2656 

Bob Gour, 218 S. Lee Street, 
BowUng Green, 843-9582, 842-0316 

Carroll Elliott, 307 College Street, 
EUzabethtown, 7654007, 765-6118 

Shelby Winfrey, 315 Sharon Drive, 
CampbeUsville. 465-8392. 465-8392 

Ed Eyl, 2252 Bradford Drive, Louisville, 
452-1001, 366-9561 

Roy CUne, 1194 Lincoln, Louisville, 
637-8249, 637-8249 

Harry Stephenson, Transylvania Oolite 
Lexington, 299-1757, 233-8310 

Jack Smith, 203 Ohio Street, Somerset, 
679-1211, 252-6602 

Richard Morgan, Route 6. Box 64, 
London. 846-6511, 864-5114 

Bunny Davis, 594 W. Lexington, 
Danville, 236-2606, 236-2606 

James Kidwell, 1112 Parkway, 
Covington, 291-6856, 581-9141 

Robert Daniels, Van Lear 

Don Hardin, P. O. Box 88, Morehead, 
764-7698, 784-7696 

Dale GriffitSi, 2334 E. Jepson, Ashland, 
324-2497, 324-1155 



Minutes of Board Meeting 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky High School 
Athletic Association met at the Kentucky Hotel, Louis- 
vUle, on Thurs<toy morning, March 27, 1969. The meeting 
was called to order by President Preston HoUand at 
9:00, with all Board members and Commissioner Theo. 
A. Sanford present. The invocation was given by James 
T. Dotson. 

Ralph C. Dorsey moved, seconded by W. H. Crowdus, 
that the reading of the minutes of the January 25th 
meeting be waived since the members of the Board had 
received copies of these minutes. The motion was car- 
ried unanimously. 

The Commissioner reported ithe results of the rec«nt 
balloting for Board membersihip for Sections 1 and 6. 
The balloting in Section 1 was as follows: Robert G. 
Fiser, 21; Fred Clayton, 20. Tc«n Mills, who was un- 
opfwsed for election in Section 6, received 44 votes. 

The Commissioner recommended the following 
changes in the K.H.S.A.A. Track Rules: 

Add a second paragraph to Regional Track Rule XIH, 
to read as follows: "If there is a tie in a track event, 
the medals shall be awarded by lot." 

Add a second paragraph to State Track Rule XI, to 
read as follows: "Tied competitors in a state event shall 
be awarded duphcsate medals." 

W. H. Crowdus moved, seconded by Don Davis, that 
the changes in the track rules recommended by the 
Commissioner be accepted and made a part of 'the track 
regulations. The motion was carried unanimously. 

Don R. Rawlings moved, se(x>nded by Foster J. 
Sanders, ithat Basketball Tournament Rule VI-A-3 be 
amended by substituting "seventy-five doUai-s" for 
"fifty doUars." The motion was carried unanimously. 
Don Davis moved, seconded by Foster J. Sanders, 
that the third paragraph of Basketball Tournament 
Rule V-A be deleted. The motion failed to carry, the 
aifirmative vote being 3, the negative vote 4. 

A secx>nd session of the meeting began at 9:00 A.M. 
Friday, March 28. 

Chairman Don Davis of the Football Playoffs Com- 
mittee made a report for his cammittee. He submitted 
the following recommendations for (dianges in the 
K.H.S.A.A. Football Rules: 

Substitute the following for Football Rule II-B: "To 
(qualify for a district championship, a team sihall play a 
minimum of four games in its class within the district. 
If itiie principal is unable to schedule the minimum of 
four games within the district, the Board of (>)ntrol 
sihall determine by lot the out-of -district game or games 
be counted, to bring the total up to four; first, games 
within the class, then other games played with Ken- 
tucky teams." 

Substitute the following for Football Rule II-C: "The 
ciiampdonship of a district, or a region if there are no 
districts, will be determined by -the Dickinson Rating 
System, as adopted by tlie Board of Control. A mini- 
mum of four games wiU be counted. If -two teams tie 
for the championsihip, there will be a playoff game on a 
date set by the Board of Control. If more than two 
teams tie, the two teams which will play to break the 
tie will be determined by the following plan: Each team 
will receive one point for each game won by a defeated 
opponent and one-half pwint for each game tied by a 
defeated opponent. If a tie results after a team's high- 
est points for any four games have been counted, an ad- 
ditional game will be counted until the tie is broken. 
Only games played with Kentucky teams sihall be 
counted. If a tie still results, dt shall be broken by the 
Board of Control." 

Don Davis moved, seconded by James T. Dotson, 
(Continued on Page Nine) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1969 



Page "Diree 



Track Questions 

These interpretations of the 1969 National Alliance Track 
and Field Rules do not set a^ide nor m'^dify any rule. The 
rulinffs are made and published by the National Federation of 
State High School Athletic Associations in response to situa- 
tions presented. — Clifford B. Fa^an 

1. Situation: Is a runner disqualified if he jostles an 
opponent? 

Ruling: Yes. To jostle means to run against or el- 
bow, such as the crowding or bumping together which 
hampers or impedes a runner. Whenever a runner is 
hampered or impeded, the offender is to be disquald- 
fid. 

2. Situation: Team A appears for an invitational 
meet with individual participants in varied uniforms: 
(a) High jumper Al has slit the outside leg seam of his 
track pants 6 to 8 indhes above the lower ihem for more 
leg freedom; (b) A2 reports to the discus ring without 
a sihirt; (c) A3 is wearing a T-sihirt under a sleeveless 
track shirt; and (d) A4 reports to the starting line for 
the 100 yard dash without sihoes. 

Ruling: The track uniforms in (a) and (b) are not 
in conformance wtih the rule. Al and A2 may not par- 
ticipate until uniform corrections ihave been made. Tlie 
uniform worn by A3 is legeil. A4 may compete without 
shoes. Shoes are recommended but not required. 

3. Situation: For the discus throw an implement 
constructed of (a) plastic, or (b) rubber is used. 

Ruling: Disci constructed entirely of rubber, or 
entirely or plastic are legal provided they conform 
with all spedficatLons for weight, size and shape. Rub- 
ber disci produced by two manufacturers examined re- 
cently have failed to meet specifications outlined in the 
rule. Coaches and officials are urged to carefully check 
all implements for legality before using them in compe- 
tition. 

4. Situation: In order to get a better grip on the 
javelin, Al has: (a) placed tape over the binding so 
that it forms a series or ridges; or (b) wraps several 
layers of tape over the center of the binding building a 
ridge. 

Ruling: Illegal in both (a) aad (b). Wrapping the 
wMpcord binding with tape is prohibited. 

5. Situajtion: In a multiple school meet, it was 
previously agreed that individual participants in the 
sihot put may use implements of their own choosing 
provided they meet specifications. The choices varied 
as follows: (a) Al an iron shot; (b) Bl a brass shot; 
(c) CI a plastic shot filled with lead pellets; and (d) 
Dl and iron shot the size of a l&'pound implement but 
drilled to weigh only 12 pounds. 

Ruling: The implements chosen in (a), (b) airf (c) 
are legal. In (d) the shot may not be used even though 
it is the proper weight. The shot shall have a smoerth 
surface, and the implement with holes drilled in it does 
not conform. 

6. Situation: For the 220 run around one curve, 
the meet management has placed one anemometer in 
the infield perpendicular to the straightaways and the 
other near the inner edge of the track parallel to the 
straightaway. 

Ruling: For races run around' one curve, one 
anemometer is to be placed on the field near the center 
of ithe curve and tangent to it and the other placed adja- 
cent to the straightaway on which the race is to finish. 
This placement will insure the measurement of any 
wind which would aid the runners. 

7. Situation: The host school recently installed an 
all-weather track. The Games Committee and meet 
director have notified schools that the maximum length 
spikes which may be used is one-fourth inch. Bl reports 
to the starting line wearing sihoes which 'have (a) fixed 
spikes one-half inch long; or (b) several ixiws of "brush" 



spikes one-A)urth inch long. 

Ruling: In (a), Bl will not be permitted to complete 
unless he changes to shoes which comply with the stand- 
ards establisihed by the meet management. In (b), the 
described shoe is legal. Because all-weather track sur- 
faces vary based upon materials used, the local Games 
Committee is authorized to establisii the maximum 
length of spikes to be used on a particular all-weather 
track and runway. 

8. Situation: When does a contestant officially be- 
come a partioiiant? 

Ruling: A contestant officially becomes a partici- 
pant when he, or a relay team of which he is a member, 
reports to the clerk of course or when he reports to the 
judge of a field event which he has entered. 

9. Situation: Does an inspector have the authority 
to disqualify a runner for committing a rules infraction? 

Ruling: No. The inspector wiU report directly to 
the head inspector who will, in turn, report to the ref- 
eree when there is any infraction or irregularity during 
a race. The inspector who observes the infraction or 
irregulartiy, such as jostling or stepping on or over the 
left line of a runner's lane, or committing infractions 
of the hurdle or relay races, shall signal by waving a 
red flag over his head. At the completion of the race, 
the inspector is required to immediately report the 
infraction to the head inspector, who will then report to 
the referee. The referee will render the necessary deci- 
sion. 

10. Situation: During the meet the referee assigns 
lanes to contestants in the final heat for the 440 yard 
dash to be run around two curves. 

Ruling: Unless announ'ced in advance of the meet, 
contestants who qualify for the final heat of races run 
around one or more curves are permitted to draw for 
select lanes. 

11. Situation: In the 180 yard low hurdles, Al fin- 
ishes first but is disqualified. Bl, who finishes second, 
was very close behind. Al finished the race with a time 
better 'than the e.xisting record. Is it possible that Bl 
could be given credit for a new record? 

Ruling: Yes. This may be done provided the time 
of Bl was recorded on at least three watches to qualify 
for a record. If the timers were timing only the winner 
of the race, Bl cannot establish a new mark. 

12. Situation: Al jositles Bl on the first turn of the 
880 yard run. Later, on the second turn, Bl jostles Al. 

Ruling: The curve inspectors will report the infrac- 
tions to 'the head inspector who, in turn, will report to 
the referee. The referee will consider the evidence and 
render his decision. It is possible both men will be dis- 
qualified. 

13. Situation: In the 100 yard dash, Al and Bl are 
both timed in 9.9, and Al is declared the winner. This 
time breaks the existing state record. 

Ruling: Only Al, the winner, is credited with the 
record. In running events only the winner is recognized 
even 'though other place-finishers are recorded with 
identical times. 

14. Situation: During the warm-up period prior to 
competition in the long jump: (a) Al marks his check 
points on an all-weather runway with spray paint; or 

(b) Bl places painted tongue depressors at the side of 
the runway; or (3) CI places a small flag at the side of 
the pit 24 feet from the scratch Une. 

Ruling: It is iUegal to place any mark or marker 
on the runway or in the pit for use during the long or 
triple jump. The marks in (a) are illegal. In (b) and 

(c) the properly placed markers are permitted. 

15. Situation: At the completion of the shot put, 
the assistant judges measure the marks with a: (a) 
fiber glass tape; (b) nylon tape; (c) steel tape; or (d) 
linen tape. 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1969 



Ruling: Legal in (a), (b) and (c), but illegal in (d). 
Measurements in 'the field events may ibe made with 
any nonnsLretdhable tape, such as fiber glass, nylon or 
steel. Linen or cotton tapes 'are not acceptable. Compe- 
tent meet managers will be ceritain to provide field 
event judges with tapes wiiich wiU accurately cind fair- 
ly measure all marks. 

16. Situation: During the long jump or triple jump, 
Al completes a legal jump. What ds the proper proce- 
dure for measuring this effort? 

Ruling: Eadh legal jump in both the running long 
jump and triple jump sihall ibe measured perpendicu- 
larly to the scratch Mne or its extension and from that 
point on ithe ground in the pit touched by the person or 
apparel of the jumper whidi is nearest the scratch Mne 
or its extension. The judges will hold the itape so that 
the reading will be made at ithe take-off boai^ or the 
scratch line extended so the contestant wiU immediately 
know Ihe result of his effort. 

17. Situation: Teammates Al and A2 are well in 
advance of the rest of the competitors and are near the 
finish line in the 880 yard' xun. Al is ahead of A2, and 
because he wants to share first place with his team- 
mate, reaches back and grasps the arm of A2. As he 
pulls him forward, A2 loses his balcince causing both 
runners to tail and roll across fhe finish line. 

Ruling: Both runners are disqualified. Al because 
he helped his iteamimate and A2 because he was helped 
by a teammate. 

Comment: Locking of ainns or grasping a team- 
mate in finishing a race usually provides assistance, 
therefore, it wouM be unusual when interlocking would 
not disqualify the competitorB. If teammates grasp one 
another, this would imply that aid W£is being given and 
would require ithe disqualification of each. Track and 
field consists of individual competiilion, and competitors 
are to be judged on thedr individual performances. 

18. Situation: With the crossbar at a height of 
13', vaulter Al cleared the bar, but his released pole 
fell forward into the bar and bounced along it to the 
standard and then fell to the ground. The crcxssbar re- 
mained in place on pins which had been wrapped with 
adhesive tape. The fallen pole did not touch the ground 
beyond the plane of the stopboard. 

Ruling: Unsuccessful trial. When a contestant clears 
the bar and his pole fails forward and rests against toe 
bar and upright standard, the trial is unsuccessful. 

19. Situation: At the starting line: (a) Al has his 
feet placed close to the top of the starting blocks; (b) 
Bl does not use blocks but is in a semi-orouched posi- 
tion; or (c) CI uses a new type of starting equipment 
which has starting blocks and hand holds so that it is 
unnecessary for him to place his hands on the track. 

Ruling: In (a), runners are required to place their 
feet on ithe starting blocks so they Eire in contact with 
the ground. The starting position in (b) is legal. In (c) , 
the equipment is illegal because hand and/or body sup- 
ports are prohibited. 

20. iSituation: In a relay, runners have been told 
they must remain in their lanes for the entire course. 
A4 is in lane 1, and in coming around ithe last curve, he 
swings wide and runs into lane 2 for two or three 
strides before coming back into lane 1 and: (a) no run- 
ners are near enough to be ihan<Ecapped by this move- 
ment; or (b) B4 and C4 are forced' to toeak stride and 
veer to the outside. 

Ruling: The referee is granted some discretion con- 
ceming .the disquahfioafion of Team A in (a), amd it is 
doubtful that he would disqualify them. However, in 
(b) , Team A should be disqualified since there is ques- 
tion as to whether B4 and C4 were hindered. 

21. Situation: During the 120 yard high hurdle 



race, Al loses Ws bsdance in going over the second 
hurdle and takes two consecutive steps on has lane Une 
before he gets back into his own lane. His action: (a) 
does not hinder Bl, who is slightly behind imn; or (b) 
forces Bl to vary his stride, and as a consequence, Bl 
hits the third hurdle and stumbles. 

Ruling: In (a), this does not cfisqualify Al, since he 
dad not interfere with his opponents. However, in (b), it 
will 'be necessary to disqualify Al, inasmuch as his ac- 
tion caused Bl to break Ms stride. 

22. Situation: Rvumer Al fate while approaching 
the findsh line and crawls so that the upper part of his 
body is across the finish fine. He does not touch nor 
break the yam, but he is the first to cross the line. 

Ruling: The finish yam is used only for the purpose 
of aiding the judges, and the winner of any pace is not 
decided upon its breakage. Runners shall be placed in 
the order in which any part of itheir bodies (torso, as 
distinguiished from head, arms, feet, or hcUids) reaches 
the finish fine. In the case of the fallen runner, it is 
not necessary that his entire body cross the finish line. 

23. Situation: In a triangular meet, the games 
committee has announced that four places will be 
scored on a 5-3-2-1 basis. In the high jump, four boys 
are entered and only three competitors clecir the bcir 
at iflhe first height. Are points awarded for four places? 

Ruling: In this situation, only three places wiU be 
awarded, and the fourth place i>oint will ibe disregairded. 
In order to earn points, a competitoir must have cleared 
the first height in the event. The points will be awarded 
according to 'the four^place designation. 

24. Situation: During the pole vault event, through 
which the contestants qualify for the state meet, Al has 
clearly won the event. There is a four-way tie for sec- 
ond place between' Bl, CI, Dl, and El. The tie stiU re- 
mains after the application of 5-2-1 (a-c). Since the tie 
does not involve first place, 5-2-1 (d) is not applicable. 
If two contestants in each event are to advance to the 
state meet, how are they designated in this situation? 

Ruling: There ds no provision in the Track and 
Field Rules Book for determining qualification to a suc- 
ceeding meet. The rules govern a single meet and/or 
its preliminaries. The games committee, or in this in- 
stance the state assocdatian, should announce or publish 
before the meet begins the procedure for determining 
competitors who qualify to advance to the next higher 
meet. It is recommended that places and points for all 
contestants be determined ibefore any decision is made 
in regard to qualification. This is a matter to be deter- 
mined by the state association involved. 

25. Situation: In an dnviitational meet, six teams 
are entered and: (a) two teams withdraw from the re- 
lay race; or (b) there are only three entries in the mile 
relay. How is the race to be scored? 

Ruling: In (a), all four teams entered in the race 
will receive points according to the manner in which 
they findsh. The scoring will 'be 6-4-3-2. In (b), Ihe three 
places wHl be scored 6-4-3. Even ithough there are only 
four teams competing in (a) and three teams in (b), the 
meet is neither a quadrangular nor a triangular. The 
number of places to be counted for the relays wiU be 
the same as the number counted for other events, in this 
Ccise five. The place winners are awcirded points ac- 
cording to the scoring table. 

26. Situation: The 180 yard low hurdles are being 
run around one full turn with properly marked lanes. 
Al hits tlie fourth hurdle and, in recovering, steps out 
of his lane and: (a) interferes with Bl; or (b) runs 
around the fifth hurdle; or (c) does not hinder any 
runner. In any case, Al ds the first to cro^ the findsfa 
line. 

Ruldng: In (a) and Ob), Al must be disqualified. 



I 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1969 



Page Five 



ASHLAND— SEMI-FINALIST 
1969 STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 




(Left to Right) Front Row: John Mullins, David Staten, Tony Hogsten, Phil Hagaman, Roger Bal- 
drldge, Jerry Owens, Ray Kleykamp, David Carter. Second Row: Mgr. Burel Kegley, Dale Bowling, 
Wally Addington, Jeff Cooksey, Mgr. Mike Gibbons, Coach Harold Cole. 



Whenever a runner interferes with an opponent, he 
shall be disqualified. In a hurdle race, a hurdler is 
required to attempt to jump all hurdles. If he fails to 
do so, he is disqualified. In (c) , Al is the winner, since 
ihis action dn no way interfered with other competitors. 

27. Silutaion: During competition in the javelin 
event, a throw by Al "floats" and lands beyond the 
line indicaiting the meet record. The near tip hits first 
and the javelin slides along the ground. 

Ruling: This is a foul and constitutes a trial which 
is not measured. The tip of the metal point of the javelin 
must strike the ground first if it is to be a legal throw. 

28. Situation: During the first heat of the prelimi- 
naries of the 120 yard high hurdles, Al stumbles and 
runs into the lane of Bl. causing him to break his 
stride and hit a hurdle. As a result, Bl is the last to 
ffinisih. 

Ruling: The referee will permit Bl to run in a sub- 
sequent heat, if there is a vacant leuie. It may be neces- 
sary to rearrange the remaining heats to provide Bl 
an opportunity to qualify. 

29. Situation: During a relay race, A3 misjudges 
the approach of A2 and runs out of the exchange zone 
and: (a) receives the baton outside of the exchange 
zone; or (b) realizes his error and returns but is not 
completely in the 2]one, althougih the exchange is com- 
pleted Whale the baton is within the exchange zone. 

Ruling: Illegal in (a) but legal in (b). The baton 
must be passed within the zone. It is permissible for 
the runner to be outside the zone provided the ax- 
change is completed while the baton is within the zone. 

30. Situation: During the mile run: (a) the assist- 
ant coach of Team A positions himself in the stands 
along the backstretch and calls split lap times to his 
runners; or (b) Bl changes has pace so he prevents Dl 
from passing him and' forces him to run to the outside; 
or (c) CI and C2 pace themselves so they continue to 
run directly in front of and to the side of El. 

Ruling: The action is illegal in (a), (b), and (c). In 
(a), disqualify all runners from Team A. In (b). dis- 
qualify Bl. In (c) , both CI and' C2 shall be disqualified. 



31. Situation: Near the finnsii line of the 880 yard 
run, Al jostles Bl and crosses the finish line first. Both 
runners are 30 yards in advance of any other competi- 
tors. Does Al qualify for second place? 

Ruling: If Al is disqualified, he cannot place in the 
competition regardless of how far he may have been in 
advance of the next finisiher. If the referee did not dis- 
qualify him in this situation, Al would be given first 
place. 

32. Situation: In the mile relay, with the teams 
competing wnthout assigned' lanes, Al, running in lane 
4, comes off the curve in second place. Bl, in first 
place, is at the pole, and CI and Dl ajre close behind in 
ianes 3 and 5 respectively. How should team members 
be placed to receive the baton? 

Ruling: This would depend upon the distance be- 
tween the first and fourth place runners cmd whether 
the gap is closing. It there is a possibility of congestion 
near the exohange zone, the teammate of Bl should be 
given lane 1; the teammate of CI, lane 3; the teammate 
of Al, lane 4; and the teammate of Dl, lane 5. The 
placement of runners in lanes for exchanges when the 
relay is run without assigned lanes is done so that each 
competitor shall be placed in the same relative lane 
position as that of his incoming teammate. The exchange 
zone judge is authorized to place the outgoing runners 
m positions best suited to meeting the passer of the 
baton. 

33. Situation: Al and Bl both clear the high jiunp 
bar at G'2" (a record for competition), but Bl is award- 
ed first place based' upon the total number of misses. 

Ruling: Both Al and Bl are given credit for the 
record. In field events, Che contestants who tie for a 
record height or distance will both be recognized. The 
purpose of breaking the tie is to determine the distribu- 
tion of points and places. 

34. Situation: In a large invitationcd meet in a 
state which does not establish limits of participation, 
the meet director, in his preliminary bulletin, announces 
that: (a) boys may not enter or compete in a combina- 

(Oontinued on Page Ten) 




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Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, ].%9 



The Flying Dutchman 




There are so many interesting highlights in the State 
Tournament and so majiy things to enjoy at the games 
besides the contests ithemselves, that it might be diffi- 
cult for the average fan to point out the one thing he 
found most refreshing and enjoyable. Not so with the 
Dutdhman who was in the same box with the Assistant 
Commissioner's little nine-year-old daughter, Laura 
Jayne IVIansfield. While the heat of action was at jts 
height little L.aura Jayne turned to the Dutchman and 
said, "If you were an Indian, do you know what I would 
call you?" When I ireplied, "No," tMs little girl said, "I 
would caU you Chief Bald Eagle." Her remarl^ was 
occasioned by an exceptionally close haircut which had 
been given the Dutclimar. just prior to the tournament, 
as well as by the fact that much of his thick, curly hair 
ihas long since gone down the drain. But I accepted the 
title of Chief Bald Eagle. The next day on arriving at 
■the sessions there was a Western Union message form 
for the Dutchman which had been sent by Laura Jayne, 
and read as follows; 

"To: Charlie Vetner the Chief bald eagle!!! 

Dear Bald Eagle I wish you would grow some hair. 
Then we would call you Chief Harry E^gle." 

Along with this could be observed many other inter- 
esting spectacles like the exhibitions put on by the 
cheerleaders, the arrival of the Governor of the State 
of Kentucky, the high spirits of the sportsmanlike fans 
and the excellent officiating which generally prevailed. 
In the Kentucky High School Tournament you get more 
than the contests. You get a variety of color which is 
surpassed nowhere in the country. 

When eight sessions of high caliber, spirited play is 
involved and there are only a few questionable calls, 
the Dutchman's opinion has to be that the over-all offi- 
ciating was good with only a few lapses which hurt 
nobody. So, in the Dutchman's last year as Dean of 
Officials, he points with pride to the men who blew the 
whistles so weU throughout the tournament. 

Bowing out with the Dutchman is a basketball official 
who has gained wide respect across the Commonwealth 
of Kentucky. A letter has just arrived from Al Gustaf- 
son, who has long been a certified Kentucky High School 
Athletic Association official, announcing that he has 
closed out his last season of basketball officiating. AI 
says, "I value highly the lasting friendships I have 
made and it has been a pleasure for me to be a part of 
the basketball program conducted so well under the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association." To this 
the Dutchman can only say, "Ditto." 

The Louisville-Jefferson County Basketball Officials 
Association did it again for the Flying Dutchman when 
this group honored him at its annual banquet on March 
31 for almost thirty years of service to the Baske'ball 
Officials of the LouisvilleJ'efferson County Metropolitan 
Area. When Ed Mudd and Earl Driskeil made the pres- 



entation, a bit of nostalgia crept in because it was in 
1945 with Ed playing on the .State Championship Male 
High School team in the old armory that the Dutchman 
stood alongside him cis he received his championship 
award. Now, the tables were turned and this young man 
who has become an outstanding leader in Jefferson 
County stood alongside the Dutchman as Ed and Elarl 
presented hun the plaque. All these things cause the cup 
to run over. . . . 

It was Earl Driskeil who named the winner of the 
Dutchman's award for tiiis month. Earl requasted this 
award be sent to Bob Tharp, Athletic Director of .Ahrens 
Trade School in Louisivlle, for his unselfi.sh service to 
the young men engaged in sports in Ahrens Trade 
School. Besides basketball. Bob and Earl have conduct- 
ed many baseball clinics for the Metropolitan Parks 
Department over the past years and have made their 
influence in the molding of character in boys and girls 
on the playgrounds. So, it is that the Dutchman applauds 
Bob Tharp and says that the Abou Ben Adhem Award 
has been mailed to Ahrens Trade High School in his 
honor — "May his tribe increase." 

As this column is being penned a radio report car- 
ries the news of the burial of General Dwight D. Eisen- 
hower. It was General Eisenhower, an ardent behever 
in sports as a developer of leaders, who .said during the 
last big war, "Send me football players and I will give 
you real leaders." This Ike did, and the Dutchman be- 
lieves this should be passed on to athletic men every- 
where, that the lessons taught in sports can well make 
the difference between success and failure in later life 
i£ they are continually applied. While thinking soberly 
of General Eisenhower, it is right that I pass on to you 
the following poem: 
I'd rather have one little flower 

Given by a friend 
Than a casket covered with roses 

When I've reached the journey's end. 
I'd rather have a loving word 
While I can hear it said 
Than all the flattering words of praise 
Heaped on me when I'm dead. 
I'd rather have a kindly smile 

From a heart that's kind and true 
Than tears that fall like summer's rain 

When I bid this world adieu. 
So if you have a flower to give 

Please bring it to me today 
While it can help to cheer me up 

Don't wait until I'm going away. 

—Author unknown 
This is the next to the last column ^\■hlch the Flying 
Dutchman vvill write for the Kentucky High School Ath- 
lete. The last column, which w\[l appear in the May 
issue, will be dedicated to forty years of memories and 
the people who have made Kentucky's schoolboy sports 
great. 

1969 Annual Meeting 

(Continued from Page One) 

Proposal VII 

The Board of Control proposes that "March 1" be 

substituted for "March 20" in Article IX, Section 1. of 

the Constitution. 

Proposal VIII 
The Board ol Control proposes that the first sentence 
of By-Law 22 be amended by adding "baseball." 
Proposal IX 
Prin. Homer Jones (Wolfe County* and Prin. B. W. 
Rideout (Anderson County) propose that the following 
be substituted for By-Law 4: "A contestant becomes in- 
eligible on his twentieth birthday." 
I*roposal X 
Prin. James A. Pursifull (BeU County), Prin. John- 



THE KENTUCKY fflGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1969 Page Nine 

1969 State Basketball Tournament Statistics 

Total number of games included in this report: 15 

Average score : For Winners 7G.2 ; For Losers 66 ; for Both Teams 142. 

Average total time from opening whistle to end of game 1 hour, 21 minutes. 

Average number of personal fouls (fouls by A plus fouls by B) 35.6 per game. 

Average number of times a player committed 5 personal fouls 1.1 per game. 

Total number of free throw attempts resulting from Personal and Technical fouls during 

all games: 50.2; Successful throws: 62.8 7" • 

Total number of overtime games : 1 

AVERAGE NUMBER 
PERSONAL FOULS 

(a) Fouls involving dribbler and guard: 6.4 per game 

(b) Times dribbler committed foul: 1.8 per game 

(c) Times 2 free throws were given unsuccessful thrower of field goal: 7. per game 
LNSUFFICIENT ACTION: 

(d) Official warning: per game 

(e) Technical fouls: per game 

BASKET INTERFERENCE : 

(f) Times per game there was basket interference or goal tending: 

At player's own basket .066 per game 

At opponent's basket .4 per game 

BALL RETURNED TO BACK COURT: 

(g) Times ball was returned legally after jump at center .13 per game 

(h) Times returned ball resulted in violation .13 per game 

VIOLATIONS : 

(i) 8-second lane 1-4 per game 

(j) Free throw lane -26 per game 

BALL ALIVE MISSED FREE THROW: 

(k) Times ball remained alive after unsuccessful free throw: 9. per game 

(1) Percent of times in (k) the free throw rebound was recovered by Defense: 76.4% 

nie P. Lee (Durrett;, and Prin. Louie Martin (Corbin) Minutes of Board Meeting 

propose that the following be substituted for By-Law 4: (Continued from Page Two) 

"A contestant becomes ineligible on his nineteenth that 'the changes in the football regulations, recom- 

birthday with the following exceptions: If the age of mended by the Football Playoffs Committee, be ac- 

nineteen is attained after the sport season has started, cepted and made a part of the football regulations. The 

he rerridins eligible for the remainder of the season in motion was carried unanimously. 

tiiat sport. For the application of this rule, the fall Don Etevis reported on the results of the questionr 

sports season shall begin on September 1, the winter naire sent to member schools of the Association spon- 

sports season on November 1, and the spring sports soring classes A and AA football teams, relative to a 

season on April 1." possible change in the site selection plan for semi- 
final and final football playoff games. He stated that 

Proposal XI 121 questionnaires had been retunied, and that the 

Prin. Helen E. Reed (Model) proposes that the fol- majority of principals representing schools in each of 

lowing be substituted for By-Law 9: "Any student who the two football classes favored no change in the pres- 

has graduated from or who is eligible to graduate from ent plan of site selection. He stated that Ws committee 

a four-year secondary school, or who has ever played on had no recommendation ait this time for a dmnge in the 

a college team, is thereafter ineligible to play on site selection plan. All members of the Board agreed 

a high schoDl team. Any team composed of secondary that there should be no change at this time in the pres- 

sch<»l players and college players shall be considered a ent site selection plan. 

college team." I^on Davis moved, seconded by Ralph C. Dorsey, 

that the words "regional" and "region" be deleted in 

Proposal XII tjhe third paragraph of K.H.S.A.A Basketball Rule V-A. 

Prin. Helen E. Reed (Model) proposes that "high The motion was carried unanimously. 

school" be substituted for "institution of learrung" in Don R. Rawlings moved, seconded by Morton Combs, 

By-Law 5-5. that the following Changes be made in K.H.S.A.A. Bas- 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1969 



ketball Rule VI: 

Substitute "One thousand dollars ($1,000.00)" for 
"five hundred dollars ($500.00)" in VI-A-1; and substi- 
tite for the first sentence of VI-A-2 "Twenty-five cents 
per mile per team for each necessary trip shall be al- 
lowed for travel expense to and from the toumament." 
The motion was carried unanimously. 

James T. Etotson moved, seconded by W. H. Crow- 
dus, that all bills of the Association for the period begin- 
ning January 1, 1969, and ending February 28, 1969, be 
allowed. The motion was carried unanimously. 

There being no further business, the meeting ad- 
journed. 

Track Questions 
(Continued from Page Five) 

tion of more ihan four events, including relays; or (b) 
a competitor may compete in both the mile and the 
half-mile runs. 

Ruling: The competitors in this particular meet are 
required to abide by the limitations estabhshed by the 
meet director, since these are within the standards 
outlined in the rules. The standards in 4-2 apply only 
when there are no conference or state eissociadon &.an- 
dards. 

35. Situation: During competition in the long jump, 
Al jumps 2ry2" on his first trial and then passes his 
second cmd third attempts. The three trials of competi- 
tor Bl result in jumps of 20'9", 19'8", and 21'y2". 

Ruling: Bl is awarded first place in the competition. 
Whenever there are ties in events where the winner is 
determined by distance, the competitor with the better 
performance in the other trials shall be considered the 
winner. In this situation, since Al had no other trials, 
Bl must be considered to have won the event. 

36. Situation: During the approach for the pole 
vault: (a) the pole passes under the crossbar but does 
not touch the ground or pit beyond the stopboard and no 
part of the vaulter's body passes under ^the crossbar or 
beyond the stopboard; or (b) the vaulter places his pole 
in ithe planting pit but does not leave the ground. 

Ruling: There has been no trial in either (a) or 
(b). 

37. Situation: At the start of the 220 yard dash: 
(a) Al does not assume his final starting position until 
slighUy after the command "set"; or (b) Bl is in mo- 
tion after the command "set"; or (c) CI leaves his 
mark with his hand just before the pistol is fired. 

Ruling: False start in (a), (b), and (c). The run- 
ner in each situation wiU be warned if this is the first 
infraction a nd disqualified if it is the secon d. 

Baseball Questions 

EDITOR'S NOTE: These interpretations of tlie 1969 Na- 
tional Alliance Baseball Rules do not set aside nor modify any 
rule. The nilines are made and published by the National 
Federation of State High School Athletic Associations in re- 
sponse to situations presented. 

Clifford B. Fagan 

1. Play: F3 is holding Rl close to 1st base and is 
straddling the 1st base foul line with his right foot in fair 
territory and the rest of his body, including 'his left foot, 
on foul ground. Fl delivers the ball to the batter. 

Ruling: It is perfecUy legal for F3 to take such 
position. Article 1 of Rule 1, Section 1, provides, "At 
the time of the pitch, all fielders shall be on fair ground 
except the catcher who shall be in the catcher's box." 
F3 has met the provisions of the restriction since the 
article does not provide that all fielders, except the 
catcher, shall be entirely on fair ground. 

2. Play: On throw from Fl to 1st base, F3 com- 
pletely blocks off 1st base with ihis body and leg so that 
Rl is tagged out by F3 with the baU. Rl would have 



made it back to Ist base safely if F3 'had not blocked 
him from getting ito the base. 

Ruling: F3 is guiLty of committing obstruction. 
Awiird Rl 2nd base. 

3. Play: Rl is on 2nd base. B2 hits a long fly ball 
which is caught by F8 'for first out. Rl touches up ait 
2nd after the catch and is able to reach home base. 
There are no errors involved. How is this scored? 

Ruling: The above play situation is not scored as a 
sacrifice hit. It counts as a time at bat for B2 but he is 
credited with a run batted in. (See Rule 2-8-4 and Rule 
9-3-4.) 

4. Play: Bl in 1st half of the 1st inning hits an 
inside the park home run. None of the defensive players 
note that Bl missed 2nd base in his circuit of the bases. 
However, a spectator calls the attention of the defensive 
coach to the infraction. Defensive coach then instructs 
F4 to obtain the ball and appeal the missed 2nd base 
to ithe base umpire prior to the time of the next pitch. 

Ruling: The umpire has no choice other than to 
uphold the appeal when F4 properly makes it. 

5. Play: Rl is on 3rd base and there is one out 
when B3 hits a hi^ foul which F5 catches in the field 
of play and his momentum subsequently carries him 
past a painted chalk line or a pre-game determined 
imaginary line into a dead ball area. 

Ruling: This is ruled a catch. As soon as F5 steps 
into the dead ball area, the ball becomes dead immedi- 
ately. In accordance with Rule 8-3-3-d, each base run- 
ner is awarded one base. In this situation, Rl would be 
awaided home base. 

6. Play: Rl is on 2nd and R2 on 1st when B3 bunts 
ball between home, 3rd and the pitcher's plate. Fl 
recovers the ball and elects to throw to F5 in an at- 
tempt (to force Rl, however, his throw as too late and all 
three runners are safe. 

Ruling: When a fielder attempts to put out a pre- 
ceding runner (Rl or R2 in this case), and is not suc- 
cessful, although there is no fielding error and the 
official scorer believes the batifer-runner (B3 in this 
case) would have reached 1st base even with perfect 
fielding by Fl, a base ttt is credited to 'the batter (B3). 
If ithe official scorer, however, felt that perfect fielding 
and a throw to 1st base would have retired the batter- 
runner (B3) had the throw been to 1st base, the scorer 
would score this a fielder's choice. 

7. Play: Bl hits a line drive between 3rd base and 
F5. F5 attempts to spear the ball backhand, which 
ricochets off the end of ihis glove. The batted ball, 
when touched by F5, is over fair ground, therefore, it 
is a fair bail. Is the play scored a base hit for Bl? 

Ruling: Most offidal scorers would score this action 
as a base hit for Bl, however, if the fine drive is a soft 
liner (one which is hit on the small part of the bat near 
the batter's hands and goes slowly enough to permit the 
fielder to properly station himself in front of it and han- 
dle it easily since it was not hit hard), it could be 
scored as an error on F5. The scoring of all line drives 
which are touched in flight by a fielder and not caught 
are situations which frequently give the official scorer 
difficulty in making decisions as to whether the batted 
ball is scored a hit or an error. 

8. Play: Bl hits ground ball which rolls along the 
3rd baseline and touches both outside and inside the 
line. Ball bounces directly over 3rd or touches 3rd. It 
alights on foul or fair ground. 

Ruling: Fair baU. 

9. Play: Rl is on 1st when B2 bunts ball on fair 
ground toward 1st base. Both Fl and F3 charge the 
ball. Fl picks it up, momentarily drops it, but recovers 
the ball in time to throw out the runner, except F4 fails 
to cover 1st base and B2 advances safely to 1st. 

Ruling: This should be scored as a base hit for B2. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1969 



Page Eleven 



There is no way ito record in the offirial score book that 
a player (F4 in this case) commits a menial error. 
Thus, the action is scored as a base hit for B2. 

10. Play: Bl hits a fair line drive over head of 
F5, who jumps ihigh attempting to field the ball. As he 
jumps upward, his glove accidentally dislodges from 
his hand and touohes the ball. F5 did not throw the glove 
off. The ball and glove fall to the ground a few feet be- 
hind F5 who retrieves ball and throws ball to F3 at 1st 
before Bl readies there. 

Ruling: Bl is out. In such cases there is no penalty. 
Had the umpire decided F5 deliberately threw the 
glove, Bl would have been entitled to 3rd base. 

11. Play: For an act by ithe pitcher to qualify as a 
feint must the 'arms or hands be involved? 

Ruling: No. Stepping off the pitcher's plate with 
the non-pivot foot directly toward occupied 2nd or 3rd 
base without throwing the ball consititutes a feint. 

12. Play: Fl has the ball in his possession and is 
on the pitcher's plate with ball in both hands in front of 
his body. Rl on ithird leads off. Fl steps directly toward 
3rd with his non-pivot foot and wdithout throwing the ball, 
runs toward 3rd in an attempt to put out or drive back 
Rl. 

Ruling: Legal. 

13. Play: Rl is on 3rd base when he attempts to 
break for home. The pitcher legally steps back off the 
pitcher's plate with his pivot foot to become an infielder 
and throws the ball toward home. Unintentionally, B2, 
who attempts to get out of the way, is struck by the 
thrown ball wihich drops to the ground near home base. 

Ruling: In this situation the ball remains alive and 
all runners may advance at their own jeopardy. 

14. Play: Rl, who is on 1st, steals 2nd during pitch. 
While en route 'his head protector falls off. 

Ruling: In such situations, umpire must decide 
whether losing of head protector was done intentionally. 
If it was unintentional, then there should be no penalty. 
On the other hand, if the umpire feels that the player 
deliberately knocked his helmet off or the action was 
due to indifference or carelessness, he should penalize 
the infraction. 

15. Play: During the Ist inning, the coach of the 
team in the field requests and is granted time to confer 
with Fl. Shortly thereafter F6 collides with F7, who is 
injured, and the coach or the team attendant comes 
onto the field to examine the injured player. 

Ruling: The second conference is not charged. It is 
justified by an obviously incapadtaited player. 

16. Play: With Rl on 2nd and R2 on 1st, upmire 
calls "infield fly" when a ball batted by B3 comes 
down near pitching mound. Fl gets the ball in his hands 
but intentionally drops it. He then throws to 3rd, where 
F5 steps on 3rd and ^throws to F4 at 2nd. F4 tags R2. 

Ruling: Both runners could have held their bases. 
They advanced at tlieir own risk. R2 is out. Rl is not 
out since he was not tagged and the force was removed 
as soon as the umpire announced an "infield fly." Had 
the infield fly rule not caused B3 to be out, the intention- 
al dropping of the ball would have. When a fielder inten- 
tionally drops a fair fly or a fair line drive, any runner 
may advance at his own risk without retouching his 
base. 

17. Play: In the last half of the last inning, Rl 
scores the winning run and the infielders leave the dia- 
mond. One player ithen returns and holds the ball while 
touching 3rd and daims Rl failed to touch 3rd. Should 
the appeal be honored? 

Ruling: The fielding team conceded the loss of the 
game when its infielders left the diamond. Unless an 
immediate appeal is made, the umpdre should declare 
the game ended before the appeal action is indtia/ted. 



18. Play: With score tied in 1st half of the 7th 
inning, bases are loaded and fair hit by B4 goes over 
the fence in flight. B4 or another ninner fails to circle 
the bases or all of them move around the base paths 
but one of the bases is not touched. 

Ruling: Umpire should insist that all runners move 
around the bases. The incidentcd missing of a base 
should be ignored, since ball was dead. 

19. Play: With Rl on 2nd and R2 on 1st, F3 re- 
quests "'time." F4 has ball when request is granted. 
When play is about to be resumed, F4, who has re- 
tained ball, tags Rl off 2nd. 

Ruling: Rl is not out. Ball remains dead until held 
by ithe pitcher on his plate and umpire calls "Play 
ball." 

20. Play: With none on base, 3rd strike pitch to 
Bl is dropped by catcher and gets between his body 
and protector. Wliile F2 hunts for 'ball, Bl continues to 
2nd. 

Ruling: Batter is entiUed to run toward 1st since 
3rd strike was not legally caught. Umpire should call 
"time" and signal dead ball after Bl reaches first and 
it is dear that ball is wedged or lost in legal equip- 
ment. 

21. Play: Rl is on 2nd. The count on B2 is ball 3 
and strike 2. Fl pitches an intentional 4th ball to B2. 
At the dme of the pitch, F2 does not have both feet in 
the catcher's box. B2 strikes at and misses the pitch. 

Ruling: This is a balk committed by the pitcher for 
pitching while F2 is not in the catcher's box. In this 
situation, ithe pitch is disregarded and Rl is awarded 
3rd. B2 is still at bat and the count remains ball 3 
strike 2. 

1969 BASEBALL PUB LrCATION CORRECTION 

CASE BOOK: 

Page 13-61. Play Ruling— In situations (a) and (c), 
the conference is not charged. In situation (b) the con- 
ference is c harged. Delete >the Comment. 

Supplementary List of 

Registered Baseball Officials 

(Lisr Compiled April 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone unless otherwise designated. If two numbers 
are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 
Atchison. Jim, 1 Race St., Dry Ridge, 824-5K77, 823-5911 
Ayers, Edward L., 623 Laramie Drive. Lexington 
Baidndge, Bui, Box 37a, Owingsvilie, 683-3li71 
Bail, Kay M., Pine Knot, 354-4974 
Barnes. Karl, P. O. Box 115, Nortonville 

Bottoms, Robert Bruce. Route 1, Mackville, 262-5586, 336-3718 
Bouse, Robert M., 452 Boone Trail, Danville, 236-2192, 236-2192 
Brangers, Larry, P. O. Box 534. Elizabehtown, 766-6528, 4-5946 
Branham, Mason, Jr., 407 Thistleton Apt., Frankfort, 664-3093 
(Bus.) 

Branstetter, Charles Elwood, 115 Kathleen Ave., Horse Cave, 

786-2032, 624-5211 
Brock, Johnnie G., Jenson, 337-3752 

Brooks, Michael, 115 Liberty St., Hopkinsville, 885-6192 
Brooks, Robert E., Jr., Box 2461, Pikeviile. 437-6366, 836-2286 
Brown, John W., 976 Waveriy, Lexington, 252-0954, 252-3212 
Burgess. Richard N., P. O. Box 452, Bardwell, 628-3527, 

628-5411 
Callahan, Gary, 401 Skyline Park Drive, 
Cappel. William F., 822 Perry St.. 

721-8070 
Clardy. Barry D., Route 2, Box 188c, 

338-3036 
Claypool, Thomas W.. Route 2. Owensboro. 684-8719, 684-5285 
Cobb, Charles E., P. O. Box 393, Smithland, 928-2712 
Cooper, Willie V., 2206 Mad.son. Paducah, 443-3107. 444-7251 
Crager, Bobby F., University Breckinridge. Morehead, 784-9462, 

784-4181. ext. 222 
Dalton, Gilbert. Stanton, 663-4378 

Daugherty, Roger. 213 E. McLaughlin. Madisonville, TA 1-6676 
Davis, Morgan, 9201 Mitchell Lane. Valley Station, 935-4400 
Delk. William L.. 614 Church St.. Ludlow. 261-8671, 431-6151 
Dunn, Chesley, Route 4, Hopkinsville 

Farris, Reuben L.. Coyle Street, Owingsvilie, 674-2862. 674-2811 
Feck. Richard A., 418 Northside Drive, Lexington, 299-8025 
Flynn, Joseph Lloyd, P. O. Box 156. Frankfort, 227-2668, Lex- 



Hopkinsville 
Covington. 431-0232, 



Greenville, 338-3610, 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLEHTE FOR APRIL. 1969 



The State TouTnament- 
Some Random Observations 

The generally good appearance and conduct of the students speak well 
for our schools and parents. 

This event certainly is a high spot of the year in our State and this ia 
no accident. We should all be grateful to the Commissioners, staff, Board 
of Control and the many volunteer helpers who combine their talents and 
efforts to make this the number one Tournament in the Country. 

The 362 member schools of the K.H.S.A.A., their principals, coaches, 
players and student bodies have a right to be proud of what they stand for 
and are accomplishing. 

The sixteen teams which earn their way to the Tournament certainly 
deserve commendation. 

Wonder if any other State Tournament is as thoroughly scouted for 
talent? Or has as many loyal supporters? Or stirs up more enthusiasm? 
Or has more vivacious cheerleaders or better bands ? 

In a word — we're thankful for Tournament Time. 



^Ae K44UfJte4t (?0M^3aM^ GENERAL AGENT 



W. E. KINGSLEY 



121-123 LAFAYETTE AVQWE 
P. O. BOX 7100 



J. E. McCREARY, M«r. 
Life Department 

LEXINGTON, KY. 40502 



CHARLES C. PRICE 



PHONE 251-4066 



ington 233-0454 
Freeman, Joe T., 125 Byron Drive, Paducah, 898-2006, 898-2006 
Gibson, Junior L., Clarkson, 242-3551, 242-3611 
Gillispie, John, Route 1, Wilmore, 858-3815 
Greer, Raymond Wayne, 10413 LaPlaza Drive, Valley Station, 

936-6002, 447-4363 
Hardin, H. Stanley, 6813 Rocky Mountain Drive, Louisville, 

968-1894. 239-3267 
Hardin, William, 134 Mackville Hill, Springfield, 336-7128 
Hazelwood, Howard P., 1211 Devonport Drive, Lexington, 

252-6112, 254-8031, ext. 386 
Herbert, Jesse L., P. O. Box 1301, Newgarden Station, Fort 

Knox, 942-3617, 624-2741 
Hill, Archie B., North 10th Street, Williamsburg. 649-2167, 

549-2484 
Holbrbook. Earl, West Liberty, 743-4135, 743-3705 
Hord, Tracy, Star Route, Lebanon, 692-3612 
Huggins, James F., 6304 Sennridge Lane. Valley Station, 



935-5251 
Hurt. Thomas C. 

792-2312 
Jaggers. Larry D. 
Jamerson. Wilbur 
Johnson. Harry B. 



122 Hamilton Ave.. Lancaster, 792-3067, 



Canmer, 528-5454 

R., Box 1, Bypro, 938-2585, 938-2110 
3024 Stanford, Lexington. 277-2889, 266-0632 
Joiner, Bruce, 1000 Central Ave., Hopkinsville 
Latham. Gene E., Route 4. Albany 

666 Echo Lane, Madisonville. 821-1642 

10 Smith St.. Florence. 371-7699, 621-6491 
408 Fourth. Pikeville, 437-7601, 437-7566 
672 Glenn Ave.. West Liberty. 743-4149, 



Littlepage, Pryce. 
Louden, James R.. 
McGuire. Johnny. 
McGuire, Ronald. 

743-3705 
McKinney, Tony. 
Manasco, Norman, 



Route 1, Morgantowu, 626-4698. 274-9429 
912 W. Noel. Madisonville, 821-8869, 821-8503 
Martin, Charlie, P. O. Box 206, Sharnsburg. 247-3141, 247-2611 
May, Douglas, Route 1, Box 439. Pikeville, 437-6512 
Meade, Thomas 0.. 2282 Thistledown. Louisville, 447-8370. 

778-6631. ext. 278 
Meredith. Willie L., 8524 Vicki Lane, Louisville. 937-3029. 

774-7624 
Mitchell, Jim, P. O. Box 163, Nortonville, 676-3272, 676-3443 
Payne, Bob, Route 1. Maceo, ?«1-'S79 
Peck. Kenneth, 404 Caramel, Hookinsville 
Peters, W. A.. Route 1. Box 377B, London. 864-6155. 864-5278 



Powers, Clark, Walker Avenue, Paris, 987-5513 

Prather, Lee R.. Route 1, Box 125, LaGrange, 279-6752 

Primm. James T.. Route 1. Lafayette Road, Hopkinsville 

Plye, John Wayne, 104 Wayside. Hopkinsville 

Ratliff, James Darrel, Route 1. Box 480. Pikeville, 437-7664 

Ray, Collis Randle, 809 North 32nd, Paducah, 442-2146 

Roc, Doyle "Buddy," Jr.. Isom, 633-2058, 633-2961 

Salsbury, Don, Route 3. Box 247. Greensburg. 932-6577, 465-7881 

Saylors, Carlee, Route 6, Murray, 753-7979, 924-5602 

Shaw. Earl, 121 Hagan, Lancaster, 792-2370. 548-3391 

Shaw, James Kelly, P. O, Box 163. Eddyville, 388-7913, 388-2211 

Sheperson, Cecil, 183 Riverside, West Liberty, 743-3882, 743-3403 

Shetler, Vernon G., 114 Sunset Place, Winston Park. Covington, 

JU 1-9136 
Smith, Benny, Route 3. Box 5. Manchester, 598-2461, 698-2461 
Smith. Richard M., Letcher, 633-7344 

Stanley, Samuel H.. 1816 Sixth Ave., Huntington. W. Va. 
Staten. Gordon Lee, Jr.. Route 2. Falmouth, 654-8660, 654-3977 
Sumner, Carl H., 3133 Dorcen Way, Louisville, 454-7294, 

459-1030. ext. 206 
Taylor. John Hill, Wallace Avenue, Leitchfield, 259-3468, 

259-4175 
Thornton, Bryce, 1115 Forrest Court, Ashland, 325-3646 
Thornton. Daniel A.. 119 Stacker Drive. Clarksville, Tenn., 

647-2234. 798-6927 
Tomerlin, Allen J., 3251 Poplar View Drive. Louisville. 447-4861 
Wallin. Charles. Jr.. 663 Northside, Lexington, 299-8639, 

299-1221. ext. 4251 
Webb. David L., P. O. Box 278, Brownsville. 597-3330. 697-2944 
White. Thomas Roger. 3316 Noe Way. No. 16, Louisville, 

459-7986, 366-9561. ext. 293 
Williams, S. Jack, 323 Steele, Frankfort. 233-5078. 564-5586 
Wilson. Philip Milo. 5003 Dreamers Way Louisville 9'!4-6234 
Wiseman, Melvin, 410 Broadway, Irvine. 723-2836. 723-9986 
Wolford. W, D., Route 1, Campbellsville, 465-5459, 465-8880 
Worsham. Ray. P. O. Box 13. Frazer. 348-3106 (Bus.) 
Wright. John David, 442 McClean Ave,, Hopkinsville 
Wylie, Wayne T.. 737 Lakeview Drive. Lexington. 254-3055, 

262-2132 
Yarbrough, Roy Dean, Jr., 2069 Fontaine Road. Lexinirton 
Young Raymond P.. 308 Woodland, Lexington, 252-6858, 

255-1402 



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HiqhkhoolAthMe 



WESTPORT HIGH SCHOOL SWIMMING TEAM 
KENTUCKY CLASS AAA CHAMPION - 1969 




(Left to Right) Front Row: A. Stanton, J. Tomlinson, K. Dayton, 
R. Noonan, J. Cross, T. Jenneman, R. Hill, S. Mann, L. Friend. Second Row : 
C. Bryant, M. Kerridge, B. Craigmyle, S. Robison, C. Hanson, D. Dean, 
L. Bloom, D. Stacey, J. Rynning, T. Conley. Third Row: C. Chedd, B. Dean, 
C. Sprigg, S. Bethune, M. Smith, C. Lynch, M. Pocock, G. Hutt, B. Lawrence. 



Official Organ of tlie 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 



May, 1969 



TATES CREEK GIRLS' GYMNASTICS TEAM 
1969 K.H.S.A.A. STATE CHAMPION 



« > 




(Left to Right) Front Row : Peggry Phillips, Kathy Kincer, Pegey Skidmore. Second Row : Leah Jones. Andrea Hop- 
kins. Kathy Carlson. Dottie Frith. Debbie Conkright. Third Row: Debbie Fuller, Kim Roller, Barbie Bransom. Betsy 
Wideg, Karen Kendall, Coach Lillian Delaney. 

WESTPORT HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS' SWIMMING TEAM 
KENTUCKY CLASS AAA CHAMPION— 1969 




(Left to Right) Front Row: L. McEdwards, E. Dailey, L. Applegate, B. Spiegelhalter, K. Bellanger, S. Hamm, 
C. Spalding. P. Bronson, R. Louis. D. Mattingly. Second Row: D. Rawles, R. Wright, H. Freitag, C. Enright, J. 
Crosby, B. Phillips, K. Matters, J. Pnrcell, J. Henderson, S. Neumann, P. Henderson. Third Row: S. Schafer, 
S. Sprigg. T. Hawkes. P. Smith, B. Henderson, M. Render, B. Ralketter, B. Dayis, D. Showalter, D. Gold, S. Pe- 
ters, S. Brakemeier, N. Abraham, C. Baoer, Ass't Coach Pat McCreadie. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXXI— NO. 10 



MAY. 1%9 



Jl 00 Per Year 



MINUTES OF THE ANNUAL MEETING 



The fifty-second annual meeting of the Kentucky 
High School Alhlelic Association was held at the Brown 
Hotel, Loiu.svilIe, on Thursday afternoon. April 10. 1969. 

President Preston Holland called the meeting to or- 
der at 2:30, and a';ked the Commissioner to call the roll. 
Sixty regularly elected delegates or altenvates an- 
swered the roll call. 

Edwin K. Buuoixl moved, seconded by John W. 
Trapp, that the minutes of the 196S meeting of the 
Assembly, which had been sent previously to all mem- 
ber schools, be approved without being read. The mo- 
tion was carried. 

Commis.sioner -Sanford then gave a report on the 
activities of the Association during the 1968-69 school 
year. (The report of the Commissioner appears else- 
where in this issue of the magazine.) 

President Holland announced the election of Robert 
G. Fiscr and Tom Mills to membership on the Board of 
Cor^trol for a four-year period, beginning July 1, 1969, 
representing respectively Sections 1 and 6. 

President Holland stated that consideration of the 
proposals was the next order of business. 

James A. Pursifull moved, seconded by Gary Knight, 
that Proposal I, providing that the Kentucky School for 
the Blind, in competition with similar scliools m other 
states, may compete under the eligibility rules of the 
North Central Association of Schools for the Blind, be 
adopted. The motion was carried with no dissenting 
votes. 

John W. Trapp mo\-ed, seconded by Edwin K. Bin- 
ford, that Propo.sal II, providing that the name of a 
disqualified player shall be reported to the Commis- 
sioner by the principal of the school which that player 
attends, be adopted. The motion carried by a vote of 
47-5. 

Arthur Mullins moved, seconded by Gary Knight, 
that Proposal III, providing that a school playing an 
ineligible player shall be suspended from the Associa- 
tion or otherwise penalized, be adopted. The motion car- 
ried by a vote of 58-1. 

Jack Fultz moved, seconded by Joe Ohr. that Pro- 
posal IV, providing that gymnastics, wrestling, and rifle 
mark.smansihip be added to the excep'ed activities in 
By-Law 8, be adopted. The motion carried with no 
dissenting votes. 

Arthur Mullins moved, seconded by Gary Knight, 
that Propasal V. providing that the head coach in foot- 
ball, basketball and baseball shall attend one clinic in 
the sport involved, be adopted. The motion carried by 
a vote of 54-0. 

Paul Wright moved, seconded by Arthur Mullins, 
that Propo.sal VI, setting forth qualifications for offi- 
cials receiving the 'higher classifications in baseball, be 
adopted. The motion carried by a vote of 52-6. 

Roy D. Reynolds moved, seconded by K. B. Sidwell, 
that Proposal VII, making March 1 instead of March 20 
the deadline for submitting proposed changes in the 
Constitution and By-Laws to the Commissioner's office, 
be adopted. The motion was carried unanimously. 

Gary Knight moved, seconded by John W. Trapp, 
that Proposal VIII, providing that member schools shall 



use registered officials in all football, basketball and 
baseball games, be adopted. The motion carried by a 
vote of .38-13. 

John W. Trapp moved, seconded by Edgar McNabb, 
that Propo.sal IX, providing that a contestant become'; 
ineligible on his twentieth birthday, be tabled. The 
motion to table Proposal IX carried by a vote of 46-3. 

Paul Wright moved, seconded by Arthur Mullins, 
that Proposal X, providing that a contestant becoming 
nineteen years of age after a sport season has started 
shall remain eligible for the remainder of the season in 
that sport, be adopted. Marvin F. Stewart moved that 
Proposal X be amended, to read as follows: "A con- 
testant becomes ineligible on his nineteenth birthday 
with the following exceptions: If the age of nineteen is 
attained after the sport season has started, he remains 
eligible for the remainder of the year in all sports, 
provided he has not been held back or failed a grade 
beyond the sixth grade." The amendment failed for want 
of a second. The vote was then taken on the motion to 
adopt the Proposal, the motion carrying by a vote of 
39-16. This was more than the necessary two-thirds 
majority. 

Lindle Castle moved, seconded by Charles Wright, 
that Propo.';al XI, making certain changes in By-Law 9 
concerning the eligibility of pupils in high school who 
ha\'e taken work in college, be tabled. The motion to 
table Proposal XI failed to carry by a vote of 18-22. 
Charles Wright moved, seconded by Shannon Johnson, 
that Proposal XI be adopted. The motion carried by a 
vote of 52-4. 

Edwin K. Binford moved, seconded by John W. 
Trapp, that Proposal XH, pro-viding that "high school" 
be substituted for "institution of learning" in By-Law 
5-5, be adopted. The motion carried by a vote of 39^. 

There being no further business. President Holland 
declared blie meeting adjourned. 

The dinner meeting of the Association was held in 
the Crystal Ballroom of the Brown Hotel at 6:00 P.M.. 
with some 500 delegates and school officials present. 

The Commissioner presented the Cavana Swimming 
Award to Coach Dick Deane of the Model High School. 
Richmond, which had won the 1968-69 trophy. 

Recipient of the Game Guy Award was Joseph R. 
Carey, eleven-year-old pupil of the Fayette County 
Yates School. The presentation of the award was made 
by Vice-President Ralph C. Dorsey. 

Thirteen former Board of Control members were 
presented plaques for their past service to the 
K.H.S.A.A. The presentations were made by President 
Holland and Commissioner Sanford. 

The Commissioner presented Charles J. Vettiner, on 
behaLf of the Association, a plaque which read: "1942- 
1969, For Distinguished Service." 

President Lawrence Gilbert of the Kentucky High 
School Coaches Association presented the Commissioner 
a plaque in appreciation of his leadership "in promoting 
high school athletics in Kentucky." 

The address of the evening was given by Ath. Ddr. 
Harry C. Lancaster of the University of Kentucky. Mr. 
Lancaster spoke on "Enthusiasm." His talk was well 
received. 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1969 



VOL. XXXI— NO. 10 



MAY, 1969 



Published monthly, except June mnd Julj, by the Kentacky 

Hiffh School Athletic AsBOciktlon 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 40501 

Second class postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 

BOARD OF CONTROL 

Pnsldent Preston Holland (1965-8!>), Murray 

Vice-President Ralph C. Dorsey (1966-70), Horse CaTe 

Directors — W. H. Crowdus (1968-71), Franklin; Morton Combs 
(1968-72). Carr Creek: Don Davis (1967-71). Independence: 
James T. Dotson (1968-72), Johns Creek: Don R. Rawlings 
(1965-69), Danville: Foster J. Sanders (1966-70), Louisville. 
Subscription Rate tl-00 per Year 



^lom the C< 



ommissionet s 



Offi 



ice 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1968-69 Basketball Participation List 
(Eligibility) 

2. School's Report on Basketball Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Basket- 
ball) 



Attention, Principals! 

Approximately 100 principals of K.H.S.A.A. member 
schools have not as yet filed requests this school year 
for their insur<i';ce sub.iidJes. If the school is underwrit- 
ing all or part of insurance protection for its athletes, 
the Boo.rd of Control will allow a n\aximum credit or 
refund of $60 to each school for "all sports except foot- 
ball," and an additional cedit or refund of $40 to each 
school maintaining a football team. Principals of sch(X)ls 
which qualify for the credit or refund should write for 
reimbursement forms at once. 

Attention, Officials! 

The registration period for K.H.S.A.A. officials is 
and has been for several years the same as the Associa- 
tion fiscal year, namely, July-June. Advance applica- 
tions for registration in football and basketball are not 
now being accepted. Previously regi.=tered officials in 
lliese sports will receive their i-enev/al application 
cards at some time during the summer months 
cifter the new National Federation publications have 
been received in the State Office. Previously registered 
officials should not send in their renewal fees until 
they receive these cards . 

The Cavana Award 

As announced at the annual dinner meeting of the 
Association, blie Model Laboratory School of Richmond 
won ithe M. J. Cavana Swimming Achievement Award 
for the school year 1968-69. Presentation of the trophy 
was made to Coach Dick Deane. This is the eighth 
year for the award to be given. 

Four schools competed for the Cavana Award this 
year. They were Model Laboratory School, Highlands 
High School, Franklin County High School, and Notre 
Dame Academy. The point score for Model was 77.4. 
Highlands was second with 70.2. 

In determining the points which a school competing 
for the award may accumulate, the State Swimming 
Committee secures the following information: 1) current 
school enrollment (grades 9-12), 2) number of pupils 
who can swim 45 feet in deep water, 3) number of pupils 
who can swim correctly three strokes (crawl, back 
crawl, elementary backstroke, breaststroke, side 
stroke), 4) number of pupils who hold Ufesavlng certifi- 
cates (American Red Cross or Y.M.C.A.). The percent- 
ages of the student body qualifying are applied to items 



2, 3, and 4, the mcucimum f>oints for each of these 
items respectively being 40, 40, and 20. Ten poinits are 
given to a school having a swimming team which enters 
a minimum of three meets, six events in each meet. 
Ten points are given for team participation (six en- 
trants) in the State Swimming Meet. 



Approved and Certified Baseball Officials 

Some seventy K.H.S.A.A. officials registered in base- 
ball took the National Federation examination for the 
higher ratings on April 21, 1969. Officials who (qualified 
for advanced ratings are as follows: 

CERTIFIED OFFICIALS 

Bosse, William V., Jr. Kidwell, James S. 

Cline, Roy E. Kimmel, Jerry 

Davis, Bunny King, James A. 

Duerson, W. R. Marlette, Ron 

Elliott, Carroll L. Mattingly, (Charles P. 

Eyl, Edward W., Jr. Morgan, Richard 

Fish, Leland Morse, Richard K. 

Frankel, Louis S. Mulligan, J. T. 

Giordano, Al Pennor, Merritt, Jr. 

Griffith, Edwin D. Ring, Bill 

Hardin, Don G. .Shaw, Earl 

Johnson, James M. Smith, W. Jack 

Jones, Frank Strain, Richard P. 

Jones, Joe S. Sullivan, Don C. 

Kaufman, Alvin R. Tyre, Donald 

Kasperski, Hetrry W. Wesche, James A. 

Kays, Allie Wingfield, Felix G. 

APPROVED OFFICIALS 

.Ashley, Kenneth Lamb. Paul W. 

Bishop, Edward L. Lambert, Irvin 

Brooks, Robert E. Pardue, Israel L. 

Bushkar, John Peters, W. A. 

Calvert, Eston Ramey, Herb 

Crager, Bobby F. Robbins, Michael J. 

Daniels, Robert A. Roe, Doyle Buddy 

Durbin, Roy Sandusky, Jerry 

Ev;tt3, Harold E. Sellier, Ed 

Farris, Reuben L. Singleton, Jim 

Freeman. Joe T. Smith, Willard N. 

Gaines, Curtis Thornton, Bryee 

Glass, Frank, Jr. Urlage, Richard 

Hendrix, Jack Waller, Bobbie E. 

Hensley, Larry O. Williams, Mickey 

Hubbs, Cletus, Jr. Winfrey, Shelby 

Ireland, Jan L. Wyatt, Bill 

Johnson, Harry B. Zirnheld, Leonard 
Kinney, Paul C. 



Minutes of Board Meeting 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky High Scdiool 
Athletic Association met at the Kentucky Hotel, Louis- 
ville, on Thursday morning, April 10, 1969. The meeting 
was called to order by President Preston Holland, with 
all Board members. Commissioner Theo. A. Sanford; 
and As.-:istant Commissioner J. B. Mansfield present. 
The invocation was given by W. H. Crowdus. 

Don R. Rawlings moved, seconded by Don Davis, 
Ihat the reading of the minutes of the March 27th meet- 
ing be waived since members of the Board had received 
copies of these minutes. The motion was carried unani- 
mously. 

The Commissioner stated that attendance at the 
recent State High School Basketball Tournament had 
reached an all-time high, with more than 136,000 persons 
in attendance during the eight sessions. He stated that, 
because of the short time elapsing between the tourna- 
ment and the Board meeting, a complete audit of tour- 
ncmient receipts and expenses is not available. Such a 
report will be presented later to the Board of Control. 

The Commissioner presented to the Board of Con- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1969 



Page Three 



trol a suggested method of breaking tie scores of foot- 
ball playoff games leading up to the cham.pionship 
game. Don Davis moved, seconded by Jams.'- T. Oot- 
son, that the method of playing off football lies, recoin- 
mended by the Commissioner, be made a part of the 
football regulations. The motion was carried unani- 
mously. 

There was a discussion concerning the dates on 
which the 1970 State High School Basl<etball Tournament 
should be played. James T. Dotson moved, seconded 
by W. H. Crowdus, that the 1970 tournament dates be 
in line with the original plan, namely, the tournament 
to end on the third weekend in March; and ithat the 
Commissioner be authorized to sign a contract with the 
Kentucky Fair and Exposition Center for the tourna- 
ment to be held in Louisville in 1970 and 1971, the dates 
for the 1971 tournament to be set later. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner reported the need for basketball 
redistrioting in two areas. He stated that District 40 
has now only three schools, and that there will be 
enough Association member schools in regions 6 and 7 
in 1969-70 for each of these regions to have four districts 
as originally planned by the Board of Control when 
statewide redistricting was done in 1965. 

After considerable discussion concerning the problem 
of placing an additional school in District 40, Don Davis 
moved, seconded by Don R. Rawlings, that the Bath 
County High School be moved from District 61 to Dis- 
trict 40. The motion was carried unanimously. 

It appeared that for 1969-70 thirty-two schools located 
in regions 6 and 7 would be members of the Association, 
thus making it possible to have eight districts of four 
teams each in these two regions. Don Davis moved, 
seconded by Don R. Rawlings, that the following align- 
ment of schools in basketball regions 6 and 7 be made 
for 1969-70; District 21— Central, Fla^et, Portland Chris- 
tian, Shawnee; District 22— Butler, Bishop David, Pleas- 
ure Ridge Park, Western; District 23 — Doss, Fairdale, 
Jesse Stuart, Valley; District 24— DeSales, Iroquois, 
Southern, Thomas Jefferson; District 25 — Ahrens, Louis- 
ville Country Day, Male, Manual; DL=;trict 26-— ALher- 
ton, St. Xavier, Seneca, Trinity; District 27— Durrett, 
Fern Creek, Jcffersontown, Thomas Moore; District 28 — 
Ballard, Eastern, Waggener, Westport. The motion wa.- 
carried unanimously. 

The Commis.sioncr read a letter from Sec'y-Treas 
Joe Ohr of the Kentucky High School Coaches Associa- 
tion, requesting sanction of the All-Star foottjall and 
basketball games for 1970 and 1971. Ralph C. Dorsej 
moved, seconded by W. H. Crowdas. :hat the sancfoi. 
request from the Kentucky High School Coaches Asso- 
ciation be granted. The motion was carried unani- 
mously. 

The Commissioner stated that, in his opinion, ;here 
is a need for a modification of the current biscball 
regulations, with respect to interrupted games in tour- 
nament play. He suggested that the following rule be 
made a part of the K.H.S.A.A. Baseball Regulations. 
"If a game is interrupted in tournament play, il will be 
reset at the same point, .same inning, same out or 
outs, same balls and strikes, same batter or number of 
batter in the batting order. A complete game of 6'2 or 7 
innings must be played." W. H. Crowdus moved, sec- 
onded by James T. Dot.son, that the baseball rules 
change recommended by the Commissioner be adopted 
and made a part of the K.H.S.A.A. Baseball Regula- 
tions. The motion was carried unanimously. 

Morton Combs moved, seconded by W. H. Crowdus 
that the insurance subsidy for each member school for 
1969-70 be a basic amount of $60,00, with an additional 
subsidy of $40.00 for each school maintaining football 
The motion was carried unanimously. 



The Commissioner was authorized to renew with thi 
Kingden Company of Le.xington an agreement concern- 
ing catastrophic insurance coverage for K.H.S.A.A. ath- 
letes, similar to the 1968-69 policy written by Kingden. 
assuming that the plan and rates are satisfactory to 
both the Kingden Company and the K.H.S.A.A. repre- 
sented by the Commissioner; and that a two-year plan 
be considered, assuming favorable rates and coverage. 

Ralph C. Dorsey moved, seconded by James T. 
Dotson, that President Holland be named delegate to 
the forthcoming annual meeting of the National Fed- 
eration. The motion was carried. 

Eton Davis moved, seconded by W. H. Crowdus, that 
Vice-President Dorsey be named alternate to the forth- 
coming annual meeting of the National Federation. The 
motion was carried. 

Don Davis called attention to the fact that the con- 
tracts of the Commissioner and the Assistant Commis- 
sioner expire on June 30, 1969. The Commissioner rec- 
ommended that Assistant Conmiissioner Mansfield be 
re<ippointed for a term of four years, beginning July 1, 
1969. Attention was called to the fact that an amendment 
to Article IV of the K.H.S.A.A. Constitution, adopted by 
a referendum sent to Association member schools, now 
provides that after an executive reaches the age of 
sixty-five, any contract given to him shall be for a 
term of one year. Don R. Rawlings moved, seconded 
by James T. Dotson, that Commissioner Sanford and 
As.sistant Commi.s.sioner Mansfield be re-appointed for 
terms of one and four years respectively, beginning 
July 1, 1969; and thai their salaries be set during the 
June meeting of the Board of Control. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

James T. Dotson moved, seconded by W. H. Crowdus, 
that all bills of the Association, beginning March 1, 
1969, and ending March 31, 1969, be allowed. The motion 
was carried unanimously. 

There being no further busaness, the meeting ad- 
journed. 



1968-69 ANNUAL REPORT 
(Presented to Delegate Assembly) 

Since the expanding program of !he Krntucky High 
School Athletic Association is financed to a large extent 
by the profits from the State High School Basketball 
Tournament, it is my plea.sure to announce that attend- 
ance at the tournament this year reached an all-time 
high. For the eight sessions more than 136,000 {persons 
were in attendance. The short time elapsing tselween 
the tournament and the annual meeting has prevented 
the Commissioner's office from making a complete 
audit on tournament receipts and expen.ses. Such a 
report will be presented later to the Board of Control, 
and will appear in a subsequent issue of the ATHLETE. 

Three hundred sixty-two schools ha\'e joined the 
Association during the 19C6-69 school year. This number 
compares with 375 members last year. 

Financial reports filed by the sixteen regional bas- 
ketball tournament managers show total receipts of 
$lS9,sa3.95. District receipts were $277,845.27. Regional 
receipts showed a decrease of one percent compared 
with 1968. District receipts showed an increase of seven 
percent. 

Fourteen hundred thirty basketball officials, 625 foot- 
ball officials, and 350 baseball officials have re.gistered 
with the As.sociation in 1968-69. Ten football niles clinics 
were held under the direction of Edgar McNabb, and 
ninety-six football officials took the National Federation 
examination for the higher ratings. Of this number, 
eleven were added to the Certified IL^t, and there were 
forty-two officials on the Approved list. Charlie Vettiner 
conducted fifteen basketball clinics, and held the School 
(Continued on Page Five) 



Paee Four 



THE KENTUa<Y HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1969 



BRYAN STATION BOYS' GYMNASTICS TEAM 
1969 K.H.S.A.A. STATE CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Shannon Reynolds, Jim Sharue. David Gorham, Fay Young. Second Row: Coach Wood- 
all, Robert Pripht, Lamont Lawson, Clint Edwards, Jeff Fuller, Casey Cooper, Gary Boston. 



Supplementary List of 

Registered Baseball Officials 

(List Compiled May 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone unless otherwise designated. If two numbers 
are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Alltn, Thomas E., Ri.ute I. Vine Grove, 828-3fi69. 422-3214 

Arnold, Brent. 306 College St.. Hodgenville, 358-4313 

Arnold. Richard Lee. C. P. O. 74, Wilmore, 858-9987 

Baker, Paul W.. 61K Perrv, Greenup, 473-6311, 473-7251 

Blevins. Boone. Staffordsville, 297-3336, 297-3738 

Honker, James M.. Brownsville. 597-3449. 749-2665 

Bowman, George, Route 5, Box 470. Covington, 681-4988 

Brock, Lavone E., Stoney Fork, 337-3271 

Butcher, Douglas. Box 14. Meallv, 789-6553 

Carlherg, John H.. 227 Main, Muldraugh, 942-2723, 942-2730 

Cash, Charles C 616 Hemlock St.. Calvert City, 395-4709 

Cook, Bobby, 268 Brockton, Richmond, 623-6186 

Craycroft, Harry S.. P. O. Box 263, Brandenburg, 422-2630, 

422-3214 
Crowe, M'ke. 776 Plainview Drive, Madisonville, TA 1-1374, 

249-3151 
Crowe, William Michael, Main Street, Stanton, 663-4476 (Bus.l 
Dawson, Ray. P. O. Box 514. Stearns, 376-8235 
Day. Jack. Central City. 754-4700, 764-2272 
Denton, William D.. 14 Clore Court. Henderson, 827-3409 
Dcxier, Freddie A., LaCenter, 665-5208 
Divine, Wayne L., 400 W. 4th St.. Central City, 754-2783, 

754-2272 
Fox, Kenneth, P. O. Box 401, South Shore, 932-4767, 932-3323 
Fritsch, V/illiam Stephen, 426 Marquette, Louisville, 426-7362 
Gaskin, Donald W,, 1848 Dunkirk Drive, Lexington, 255-4335, 

252-2626 
Gibson. James D., 103 Center, Coal Grove, Ohio, 533-0318, 

Ashland 739-4446 
Goff, Cecil, Route 1, Lcitchfield, 269-3980, 259-4175 
Hale. Richard F.. Route 1, Russellville, 726-2801 
Handley. Samuel, Route 1, Hodgenville, 368-4660, 368-3195-3196 
Henry. James D.. 1571 Parsons Place, Louisville, 451-2770, 

587-6923 
Hordel, Christopher L., Quirey T/P, Sturgis, 333-2269, 333-4008 
Hildabrand, Gerald, P. O. Box 313, Lewisburg, 755-6562 



Hill, James P., Drakesboro. 476-8272. 476-8411 
Hobbs. James. Jr., 70S E. Walnut. Mayfield. 247-3457 
Morton. John L., Route 2, Owensboro, 683-6234, 684-5285 
Houchens. Joe D.. Route 4. Glasgow, 678-2317. 651-8371 
Hudson. Miles F., 407-B Stryker Village. Fort Campbell. 

798-2747. 798-3824 
Hurst, Terry, 416 Kentucky Court. Lexington, 266-2672 
Huchens, Jim, P. O. Box 243, Belfry, 237-1204, 353-7362 
Johnson, Leroy, Lamb, 434-2294, 427-2611 

Judy, Joe Lee. 117 Buttle Grove. Cynthiana, 234-1660, 234-4313 
Kasey. Michael M.. 1314 S. Elm St.. Henderson. 826-2097, 

826-3733 
Kearns. Wayne, 216 N. Miller, Cynthiana, 234-2297, 234-1100 
Kelley, Richard. P. O. Box 1505, Ashland, 324-9545, 325-1751 
Kinch. Marvin N.. 151 Woodlawn, Somerset, 679-3690, 678-8191 
Kochin. Steve Louis, Williams Trailer Court, Richmond, 623-9363 

I Bus. I 
Lambert, Ii-vin, 5110 Rural Way, Louisville. 969-4718, 582-5504 
Lindsey, Eugene M., Route 3, Shelbyville, 633-3829, 633-2471 
Logsdon, Charles Wm.. 101 Hurstborne, Bardstown, 348-9419, 

34S-5931, ext. 273 
Loy. Harry. 606 Tutt St., Columbia, 384-3949, 384-2751 
McCamish, Dan L., Route 6. Box E4, Lexington, 264-2209, 

258-9000, ext. 2517 
McDonald, Walter Dixon. Route 1. Corydon, 533-6637, VA 

7-2506 
McDowell, Charles V.. 2419 Roosevelt. Ashland, 325-2886, 

324-1155, ext. 376 
Marston, Donn A., P. O. Box 385. Carrollton, 732-6791, 732-5215 
Meredith, M. Kenneth, 9905 Stonestreet Road, Louisville, 936-4607 
Vilby, W. C. Route 3, Box 165. Greensburg, 932-5692 
Morgan, William Patrick. 621 High St.. Coal Grove, Ohio, 

532-4307, 532-6346 
Morris. Dean, Sulpher Well, 565-3723 
Murphy. Darrcll, Route 2, Russellville, 726-2644 
Nash, Lloyd R.. 1924 Northern Dancer Court, Owensboro, 

683-6686, 683-2401, ext. 548 
Newman. Joe D.. 218 Paradise, Greenville. 338-4246 
Owens. Roy, Route 4. Box 71, London, 864-7489 
Pace, Donald, 2023 Deauville, Lexington 
Padgett, R. K., 112 Richardson Drive. Somerset, 678-5485, 

678-4141 
Pierson. Oscar, Jr.. Owenton, 484-3834. 484-3878 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1969 



Page Five 



MODEL HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS' SWIMMING TEAM 
KENTUCKY CLASS AA CHAMPION— 1969 




'Left to Rifht) Karen Powpll, Toy Wiifi^ins. Beth Kirkpatriek, Janet Bock, Amelia Smith. Nancy Cornelison. Cheryl 
Combs, Missy Smith. Saliy C'henault, Thelma Hume, Ann Moretz, Ann Brown. Tammy Thompson, Beth Coekerham, 
Julie Powell, Cathy Combs Betsy Smith Gail Curry Sue Ann Hounchell. Valerie Brotherton, Coach Dick Deane. 



Prathor, David Wayne. Route 1, La Grange, 279-5812. 279-5812 
Rhodes. Joseph Donald, 1529 S. Corum Drive, Madisonville. 

K21-7D:rj, 821-47S0 
Roberts. Carl S.. 222 S. lUh St.. Murray, 753-2987 
Robinson. Joseph Byron. 1120 McConneil St.. .Ashland. 324-0572 
KodBers. Hilly C.erald. FarninRton, Fl 6-2033 
Rowe. Steve, Hugh PoUind Hall, Western State University, 

Bowling Green, 745-4171, 745-4756 
Runyon, Tommy Dean. P. O. Do.x 181. Belfry, 353-7883. 353-7362 
Sellier. Edward F., Jr.. 520 Cricklewood Drive. Lexington. 

299-81142. 299-4007 
Sims. Wayne, Route 2, Brandenburg, 422-3198. 422-3214 
Sknggs. Randall, Bonnieville. 531-1618, 765-4181, ext. 28 
Smallwood. Talmage. Stanton 

Smith. Ireland. P. O. Box 66. Belfry. 353-7090. 235-1660 
Stanley. O. A.. P. O. Box 156, Belcher. 754-8567 
Stralton. Robert J., Clenn Avenue, Shelbyville. 633-3816. 633-1612 
Stratton, Robert Wayne, Glenn Avenue, Shelbyville. 633-3816 
Straub. Walter E.. 940 Summit Ave., Glendale, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

771-7642 
Streible, Howard P.. Webbmont. Shelbyville. 633-4374, La Grange 

279-5540 
Strickland. Herbert C. 105 Friar Drive, Clarksville. Tenn., 

647-7477, 798-3709 

W. R. iBudl. Route 5. Glasgow. 678-2539 
Loyd. 20.1 Allison, Greenville. 338-3590. 338-4631 
Carl D.. 820 Fair Franz Drive. Ashland, 325-2606 
Carl L.. 11 Welch St., Clarksville. Tenn., 645-4638 
John. K03 East Drive. Dan-ille. 236-3915. 236-3181 
Li>on. Greensburg. 932-5174. 9.32-4996 
Vincent, Johnny "Pete," Route 2. Smiths Grove. 597-3434 
White. John Stanley, 1517 Fairfax Drive, Ashland, 325-2090, 

325-2090 
Williams. Mickey. 1814 Versailles Road, Apt. C-5, Lexington, 

252-0129 
Wilson Lee, 3011 Epworth. Owensboio, 685-2656 
Wise, Dale, Route 1. Carlisle 



Tarry, 
Tarter, 
Taylor 
Taylor. 
Taylor. 
Upton. 



Annual Report 

(Continued from Page Three) 

for Basketball Olfieials. Han-y Stephenson conducted a 
school for baseball ofticial.s. Si.xty baseball officials are 
currently working for bicrher ratins^s in this spori. 
Thirty-four basketball officials were added to the Certi- 
fied list in 1968-69, with .sixty-one receiving the Approved 
rating. Regional representatives in the three sports men- 



tioned continue to render a fine service to the officials 
and schools in their respective areas. 

It has been necessary to suspend only one member 
school from the Association this year. Violation of the 
Preceding Semester Rule was involved. 

The numbers of schools maintaining sports sponsored 
by the Association are approximately the same as last 
year with the exception of golf and track teams for 
both boys and girls, which show a slight increase. The 
1968-69 figures are: boys' golf, 157; girls' golf, 31; boys' 
track, 205; girls' track, 112; boys' tennis, 76; girls' ten- 
nis, 56; wrestling, 40; baseball, 301; basketball, 350; 
football, ISO; cross country, 104; boys' swimming, 34; 
girls' swimming, 27; boys' gymnastics, 18; girls' gym- 
nastics, 17; rifle marksmanship, 7, 

The continued cooperation, assistance, and construc- 
tive criticism of the adniinistrators and coaches wtio 
represent our member schools are solicited. 



New Films 

The films listed below are in the Film Library of the Univer 
.sity of Kentucky College of Education. 

WORLD SERIES OF 19(«, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels, color, $1.00 
The Detro.t Tigers, playing in the World Series for 
the first time in twenty-three years, beat the St. Louis 
Cardintds b>- four games to three. The Cardinals took a 
3 to 1 game lead but the Tigers came back to win the 
series. Mickey Lolich won three games for the Tigers. 
Bob Gibson won two games for the Cardinals but was 
the loser in the final game 

OHIO COUNTY VS. CENTRAL il969 BASKETBALL 
FINALS I. e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, silent, $1.00 
Central High School of Louisville won the State 
Championship by defeating Ohio County, 101-72, in the 
final game. Centi-al eliminated Richmond Madison, Hop- 
kinsville, and Maytown to reach the championship 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1969 



1969 Kentucky State High School Swimming Meet 

Plantation Club, Louisville, Kentucky, February 21-22, 1969 



TEAM SCORING — CLASS "AAA" BOYS 



TEAM 



Westport 

Trinity 

Paul G. Blazer 

Atherton 

St. Xavier 

Covington Catholic . 

Tates Creek 

Henry Clay 

Laiayetite 

Bryan Station 

Waggener , 

Fern Creek 

Newport Catholic . . 
Franklin County . . . 

Seneca 

Paducah Tilghman . 

Eastern 

Bishop David 

Western 



I. 



26 

32 

20 



22 

10 

8 

24 



18 

14 



6 

4 



2 












19 

19 

12 

16 



11 

5 

10 













1 








si 



20 

15 

11 

23 

9 

12 





10 


























26 
24 
11 

3 
2 
4 















5 

11 



32 

13 






22 
1 
9 








1 



2m 



§£ 






24 


8 


13 


19 


251/2 


20 





12 


14 





18 


16 


5 


3 





13 


13 


4 


5 


SV2 


24 


16 


A 














u 


























































































29 
15 
13 
16 


3 
5 






3 







ra 



33 

30 
7 

12 
5 
2 
3 





1 









^ 



^ 



•3^ 

CO c 



26 


20 


22 
8 



32 

10 

24 
6 

14 









231 

2ioy2 

120 
117 
101 
88 
6IM1 
59 
42 
39 
38 
28 
22 
13 

4 

2 









200 Yard Medley Relay- 
Trinity (Callahan, Baron, 

Wiseman, Radmacher) 1:48.6 

Weatport (Kedmon, Dean. Cross, 

Miles) 1 :B2.2 

Henry Clay (Ockerman. Easton. 

Skeens. Watken) 1:62.3 

St. Xavier (Mullins, Francis. 

LeMaster. Kunz) 1:63.7 

Paul Blazer (Eaves. Irey. 

Williams, Borrell) 1:53.9 

Bryan Station (Steele, McCrory, 
Tweedale, Simpson) 1:67.9 

200 Yard Freestyle— 

Tingley, Atherton 1:49.1 

Hartye, Trinity 1:51.4 

Sweet. Paul Blazer 1:53.5 

Seolie. Covington Catholic __1 :54.1 

Watkins, Henry Clay 1:55.2 

Lawrence. Westport 1:59.1 

Tlngley set a new state record in this 
event with his time of 1:49.1. 



3. 50 Yard Freestyle— 

1. S. Weston. Atherton 

2. M. Smith. Wesport 

3. S. Busch. CoviHKton Catholic 

4. M. Shifflor. Paul Blazer 

5. ' D. Ki^enig. Trinity 

6. A. Parker, Lafayette 



1. 


B. 


2. 


J. 


:t. 


R, 


4. 


M 


5. 


D 


6. 


B. 



22.7 
22.9 
23.1 
23.2 
23.3 
23.4 



200 Yard Individual Medley— 

(i. Hutt. Westport 2:08.3 

K 11. -11, Atherton __ 2:08.8 

T. Tursley. Trinity 2:10.5 

R. Kli, Paul Blazer 2:11.7 

M. Terry, Atherton 2:12.6 

S. Hethune. Westport 2:14.9 

Fancy Diving — 

J. Thompson. St. Xavier 345.95 

J. Finn. Covington Catholic _,_321.35 

R. Scheen- St. Xavier 318.70 

P. Russell Trinity 299.60 

M. H,.\v lid. Koin Creek 258.05 

M. Campassi Franklin County 241.70 

100 Yard Butterfly— 

S. Watkins. Henry Clay 

F. Busch. Covington Cath. _- 

M. Pivcook, Westport 

D. Tweedale. Bryan Station 

T. Callahan. Trinity 

K. Young, Trinity 



55.7 
56.5 
66.6 
57.6 
68.1 
69.2 



TOO Yard Freestyle— 

S. Weston, Atherton 

M. Seelie, Covington Catholic 

M. Shiffler, Paul Blazer 

D. Koenig, Trinity 

S. Wiseman. Trinity 

W. Roscoe, Tales Creek 

100 Yard Backstrokei— 

B. Tingley. Atherton :57.0 

M. Richards, Tates Creek :69.5 



60.3 
51.0 
61.3 
62.9 
63.6 
53.6 



3. R. Eli, Paul Blazer 1:00.6 

4. A. McAlister. Tates Creek 1:00.6 

5. D. Dean. Westport 1:00.9 

6. J. Callahan. Trinity 1:02.8 

9. 400 Yard Freestyle— 

1. E. Bell. Atherton 4:04.5 

2. R. Sweet, Paul Blazer 4:05.0 

3. M. Pocock, Westport 4:05.2 

4. J. Hartye. Trinity 4:05.9 

5. S. Bethune. Westport 4:06.0 

10. 100 Yard Breaststroke — 

1. G. Hutt. Westport 1:03.1 

2. C. Lynch, Westport 1:03.8 

3. M. Terry, Atherton 1:06.3 

4. D. Baron, Trinity 1:06.6 

5. T. Pursley, Trinity 1:07.1 

6. B. Pursley. Trinity 1:09.9 

Hutt tied the state record with his time 

of 1:03.1. 

11. 400 Yard Freestyle Relay— 

1. L:ifavette (Wilson. Hand, Wade. 
Parker) 3 :41.8 

2. Westport (Stacy, Sprigg, 

Jenneman. Kerridge) 3 :45.2 

'4. Waggener (Duthie. Evans, 

Hammond. Schilling) 3:60.6 

4. St. Xavier (Kleinert, Worland, 

Ross, Hensley) 3:64.1 

5. Paul Blazer (Borrell. Payne, 

Eli. Rogers) 4:02.8 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1969 



Page Seven 



TEAM SCORING — CLASS "AAA" GIRLS 



TEAM 



I 



1 



11 



ll 



h Q 



S 3 



1b 




16 


26 


20 


25Vz 


10 


11 


18 


13 


11 


14 








5 





1 








1 








12 


























21/2 












ll 
§1 









Westport 

Sacred Heart 

Tates Creek 

Henry Clay 

Paul Blazer 

Atherton 

Notre Dame 

Bryan Station 

Eastern 

Seneca 

Laiayette 

Waggener 

Pleasure Pidge Park 

Fern Creek 

Durrett 

Paducah Tilghman .. 



22 

26 

20 

14 

8 

32 

24 

18 



10 





6 

4 







26 

17 

25 

12 

11 







2 













1. 2O0 Yard Medley Relay— 

1. Atherton (Mueller, Gustafson, 

Lewis, Bell) 2:04.4 

2. Sacred Heart (White. Tierney, 

Bell, Aubrey) 2:06.7 

3. Notre Dame (Saalfeld, Kuebbing, 
Ahr. Hoffen) 2:06.9 

4. Westport (Henderson, Rulketter, 
Showalter, Henderson) 2:07.0 

5. Tates Creek (Wombwell. Roscoe, 
Dougherty. Stanback I 2:14.7 

6. Bryan Station (Wasson, Toler, 
Blythe. Green) 2:16.1 



2. 200 Yard Freestyle 



26.5 
26.6 
27.4 
27.9 
28.2 
28.3 



331/2 
10 




91,2 


9 

12 


19 








25 
19 
12 
10 
11 

e 



7 









17 

28 







24 



23 

1 






18 

23 
5 


11 


17 

3 
9 




7 




27 
8 

13 

22 
7 

16 













22 
32 
16 


23 













22 

32 

4 

26 

24 

20 



18 

8 

6 





14 

10 







4. 200 Yard Individual Medley— 

1. p. Smith. Westport 2:18.1 

2. M. Baker. Sacred Heart 2:22.2 

3. K. Kessinger, Tates Creek 2:25.8 

4. K. Sweet, Paul Blazer 2:27.4 

5. S. Kessinger. Henry Clay 2:28.5 

6. P. Hendeison. Westport 2:36.7 

Smith set a new state record in this 

event with her time of 2:18.1. 



254 Vz 
240ya 
116 
115 
106 Va 

99 

55 

49 

38 

32 

31 

23 

20 

15 
91/2 



04.6 
05.4 
06.1 
06.7 
07.2 
08.3 
this 



5. Fancy Diving — 



B. Ericksen, Sacred Heart 

S. Peters, Westport 

K. Penna, Waggener 

L. Paine. Waggener 

S. Whinery, Eastern 

K. Wheeler, Eastern 



-348.45 
_324.80 
_318.95 
_296.65 
.264.55 
.251.50 



1. K. Mc.-\lister, Tales Creek 2:02.2 

2. D. Wright, Sacred Heart 2:02.4 

3. K. Kessinger, Henry Clay 2:07.0 

4. S. Neumann, Westport 2:07.7 

5. K. Watson, Paul Blazer 2:08.2 

6. S. Hoft. Tates Creek 2:09.1 

McAlister set a new state record in this 

event with her time of 2:02.2. 



3. 50 Yard Freestyle— 

1. C. Richards, Lafayette __ 

2. T. Hawkes. Westport 

3. S. Blythe. Bryan Station 

4. H. Freitag, Westport 

5. B. Davis. Westport 

5. A. Neyer. Paul Blazer 



6. 100 Yard Butterfly— 

1. p. Henderson, Westport 1 

2. K. Wyatt. Sacred Heart 1 

3. D. Ahr, Notre Dame 1 

4. K. Sweet, Paul Blazer 1 

5. A. Daniels. Sacred Heart 1 

6. P. Borah, Seneca 1 

7. 100 Yard Freestyle— 

1. D. Wright. Sacred Heart 

2. T. Hawkes. Westport 

3. C- Richards, Lafayette 

4. \. Harvey, Henry Clay 1 

5. F. Wombwell, Tates Creek 1 

6. A. Neyer. Paul Blazer 1 

Wright set a new state record in 

event with her time of :56.4. 



05.5 
06.5 
07.2 
08.8 
09.0 
10.2 



56.4 
57.4 
59.2 
00.2 
02.0 
02.0 
this 



8. 100 Yard Backstroke— 

1. K. Wyatt, Sacred Heart I 

2. T. Bolton, Henry Clay 1 

3. R. Wright. Westport 1 

4. S. Huff, Tales Creek 1 

6. K, Watson. Paul Blazer 1 

6. S. Sprigg, Westport 1 

Wyatt tied the state record in 
event with her time of 1 :04.6 

9. 400 Yard Freestyle— 

1. B. Bell. Atherton _.4:Ili.2 

2. K. McAlister, Tates Creek 4:24.4 

3. K. Kessinger, Henry Clay 4:25.1 

4. S. Neumann. Westport 4:34.3 

5. S. Kessinger, Henry Clay 4:44.0 

6. S. Schafer. Westport 4:54.6 

Bell set a new state record in this event 

with her time of 4:16.2. 

10. 100 Yard Breaststroke— 

1. M, Baker, Sacred Heart 1:11.5 

2. P. Smith, Westport 1:12.2 

3. K. Kessinger. Tates Creek 1 :12.8 

4. G. Gustafson, Atherton 1:14.0 

5. B, Miles, Atherton 1:17.2 

6. R. A. Englert, Sacred Heart _._1:I8.0 



11. 400 Yard Freestlye Relay— 



Sacred Heart (Cowart. Wagoner, 
Kleinert Daniels! 

2. Henry Clay 

3. Paul Blazer _lv_ 

4. Westport 

5. Atherton - 

6. Bryan Station 



4:08.1 
4:09.0 
4:24.7 
4:26.5 
4 ::1K.7 
4:40.6 






Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1969 



University of Kentucl^y Coliseum, Lexington, Kentucky, March 21-22, 1969 



TEAM SCORING— CLASS "AA" BOYS 



TEAM 



>> 

o o 







GJ 


g>^ 






-si 

^1 




Yard 
aststroke 


Yard Free- 
e Relay 


¥l 


O "O 
o C 


fcQ 


CD "^ 


§1 


Sm 


Pi 


§1 


S tf 



o o 



Hopkirtsvalle 

Highlands 

Model 

Dixie Heights 

Fort Knox 

L'ville Country Day 

Good Shepherd 

Shelbyville 

Murray 

Simon Kenton 

Woodford County . . 

Danville 

Campbell County . 

Lloyd 

Beechvvood 

Newport 

Sayre 



24 


35 


32 


9 


14 


26 


26 


4 


22 
20 



5 








8 


3 














10 




















11 





















37 

I6V2 

13 

10 



4 

y/2 
2 







5V3 













6 

3 

16 

13 

9 

11 

10 





16 









7 



2 



21 
39 
21 
7 








2 


3 




13 

15 

11 

18 

10 



9 



16 















1 



13V2 

9 
13 

9'^ 



9 
12 




16 


11 













10 

11 

15 

16 

20 





2 

16 













3 





31 

n 

17 

10 
11 






1 


! 
1 






19 


24 


30 


32 


15 





3 


16 





22 


12 


26 ! 











20 














13 














14 



























233^/2 
208 1/3 
161 
I34I/2 

94 

87 

36 VS 

35 

32 

32 

23 

17 1/:* 
16 
13 
7 



1. 200 Yard Medley Relay— 

1. Highlands (Rice. Kennedy. 

Phister. Racke) 1 ;64.0 

2. Dixie Heights (Taglauer, Lanham, 
Rabe. Hilsl 1:64.7 

3. HopkinsviUe (Cayce. Hardin, 
ShankMn. DaltonI 2:00.0 

4. Fort Knox (Rickman. Washington, 
Handley. Kleysteuber) 2:03.2 

5. Country Day (Larsen, Brady. 

West. VonBorries) 2:08.6 

Highlands set a new state record with 
Iheir time of 1 :54.0. 

2. 200 Yard Freestyle— 

1. McKinney. Model 2:02.8 

2. P. Dorroh. HopkinsviUe 2:04.3 

S. B. Dorroh, HopkinsviUe 2:06.0 

4. Matthews, Lloyd 2:16.1 

5. Watkins. Model 2:16.4 

B. Scott. HopkinsviUe 2:18.3 

3. 50 Yard Freestyle— 

1. HigKins. HopkinsviUe :24.4 

2. Park, Model :24.8 

3. Dalton. HopkinsviUe :25.2 

4. Ross, Highlands :25.3 

5. Hils. Dixie Heights :26.1 

6. Mahoney. HopkinsviUe :26.2 

4. 200 Yard Individual Medley— 

1. Flerlage, Simon Kenton 2:21.0 

f. Lanham, Dixie Heights 2:24.8 



B. Cornelison. Model 2:26.8 

4. Bryant. Country Day 2:27.3 

6. Ramsey, Good Shepherd 2:28.7 

6. Carter, Fort Knox 2:32.2 

5. Fancy Diving — 

1. Tull. HopkinsviUe 286.65 

2. Lukens. Highlands 270.15 

3. Mignerey. Highlands 248.20 

4. Brotherton. Model 244.10 

5. Wylie. Model 238.30 

6. Blades. Highlands 225.40 

6. 100 Yard Butierfly— 

1. Battle. Murray :56.5 

2. Rabe. Dixie Heights 1:00.4 

3. Phister. Highlands 1:05.3 

4. Cornelison. Model 1:06.0 

B. Carter, Fort Knox 1:06.2 

6. Ramsey. Good Shepherd 1 :06.7 

7. 100 Yard Freestyle— 

1. Flerlage, Simon Kenton :54.5 

i. Park. Model :55.3 

3. Ramsey, Good Shepherd :57.4 

4. Holbrook. Danville :57.5 

5. Scott, HopkinsviUe :68.1 

6. Ho^rsting. Dixie Heights :58.4 

8. 100 Yard Backsiroke — 

1. Battle. Murray 1:01.6 

2. Kleysteuber. Fort Knox 1:07.1 

3. Taglauer, Dixie Heights 1 :08.4 

4. Rice. Highlands 1:09.6 



5. Rozen. Model 1:10.3 

6. Radford. HopkinsviUe 1:11.6 

9. 400 Yard Frees;yle— 

1. P. Dorroh. HopkinsviUe 4:24.6 

2. Pettengill, Motlel 4:25.1 

3. B. Dorroh, HopkinsviUe 4:39.1 

4. Rickman. Fort Knox 4:53.7 

5. Brady. Dixie Heights 5:02.5 

P. Dorroh set a new state record in this 

event with his time of 4:24.6. 

10. 100 Yard Breasts.roke— 

1. Kennedy. Highlands 1 :08.i^ 

2. Ewing. Woodford County 1:13.2 

3. Bryant, Country Day 1:14.2 

4. Howard, Model 1:14.3 

5. Higgins, Hopkinsvills 1 :14.8 

6. Hardin. HopkinsviUe 1:16.3 

11. 400 Yard Freestyle Relay— 

1. Highlands (Wilson, Farrell, 
Bathiany. Rossi 4:00.0 

2. Country Day (Brady. Bryant. 
Pickerel!. Bourgisst 4:06.6 

3. HopkinsviUe (Martuscelli, McCollum. 
Cayce, Nichol I 4:12.4 

4. Fort Knox (Washington. Labbe. 
Miller. Handley I 4:15.6 

6. Shelbyville (Floyd. Taylor, 

Ballard. Miller) 4:16.4 

6. Dixie Heights (Ryan. Baker. 

Meader. Moersting) 4:19.!* 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1969 



Page Nine 



TEAM SCORING— CLASS *'AA"— GIRLS 





>. 




















s 




"3 






^ 








o 










TEAM 


•2^ 
■3 

O OJ 






-I 






s >> 

CD -.- 

ix a; 
^ c 

St. 


100 Yard 
Backstrok 






.3 
So; 
> a; 

o >> 






20 
26 


29 

14 


17 
29 


37 

18 


27 
31 


17 
12 


20 

24 


13 
11 


40 
16 


38 
28 


24 
32 


'JS_' 


Hie'hlajid*^ 


"41 







18 


16 


11 


4 


17 


20 


11 


29 


5 


26 


157 


Dixie Heights 


22 


9 





20 


10 


26 


12 





6 





22 


IL'T 


Villa Madonna 


32 


7 





3 





11 





13 





20 


20 


10(i 


Bourbon County 


24 


16 


11 








9 


10 


22 





2 





91 


Beechwood 


10 








4 


18 

















10 


4' 


Shelbwille 


14 





1 











7 











18 


in 


S^yi'g 








16 














16 











V 


Fort Knox 


























2 





14 


i(i 


Lexington Catholic . . 








3 














7 











10 

























D 














Woodford County — 

















3 





















1. 200 Yard Medley Relay— 

1. Villa Madonna (Lieahy, Scheper, 
Goff. Walther 2:07.9 

2. Highlands (Klausig, Guest, Reed. 
Grimm I 2:11.9 

3. Bourbon County (Gibson, Thornbury. 
Gibson, Patrick) 2:16.0 

4. Dixie Heights (Herold, Bishop, 
Newport. Hungler) 2:24.6 

5. Model (Wiggins. Cockerhan, 
Kirkpatrick. Chenault) 2 :2S:3 

2. 200 Yard Freestyle— 

1. Gibson, Bourbon County 2:29.3 

2. Bezold. Highlands 2:32.5 

3. Payne. Hopkinsville 2:33.2 

4. Cornelison, Model 2:34.3 

5. Smith. Model 2:39.4 

6. Daniels, Dixie Heights 2:53.1 

3. 50 Yard Freestyle— 

1. Ireland, Sayre :2e.2 

2. Jones, Highlands :26.6 

3. Brown, Model :27.6 

4. Gibson, Bourbon County :29.5 

5. Grimm, Highlands :29.6 

6. Munday, Hopkinsville :29.9 

Ireland set a new state record in this 
event with her time of :26.2. 

4. 20O Yard Individual Medley— 

1. Klausing, Highlands 2:38.7 

2. Thompson, Model 2:47.4 

3. Combs. Highlands 2:62.5 



Daniels. Dixie Heights 
Herold. Dixie Heights 



.2:58.6 
_3:00.7 



Fancy Diving — 

Wight, Highlands 255.45 

Hounchell. Model 237.15 

Kohl, Highlands 213.66 

Keller, Beechwood 208.60 

Cooper, Dixie Heights 193.40 

Curry. Model 192.90 

100 Yard Eu.ierfly— 

Newport, Dixie Heii^hts - 1:10. 5 

Munday, Hopkinsville 1 :14.3 

Thorn pson , Model 1:14.6 

Walther, Villa Madonna 1:16.3 

Taglauer. Dixie Heights 

Lyster, Bourbon County 1:21.1 

100 Yard Freestyle- 
Brown, Model 1:02.7 

Cecil, Highlands 1 :06.7 

P. Voorhies, Dixie Heights l:09.s 

Drury, Hopkinsville 1:11.3 

Patrick. Bourbon County 1:11.5 

Bathiany, Highlands 1:13.9 

100 Yard Backstroke- 
Ireland. Sayre 1:08.3 

Leahy, Villa Madonna 1 :11.3 

Gibson. Bourbon County 1 :12.8 

Klausing, Highlands 1:12.8 

Gibson, Bourbon County 1:15.2 



i;. Smith, Model 1:17.7 

Ireland set a new state record in thi^ 
event with her time of 1 :08.3. 

9. 400 Yard Freestyle— 

1. Bock, Model 5:20.7 

2. Cornelison. Model 5:28.1 

3. Payne. Hopkinsville 5:30.4 

4. Powell. Model 5:56.2 

5. Smithson, Hopkinsville 5:56.6 

(i. Hewling, Highlands ._ H:17.;^ 

10. 100 Yard Breaststroke— 

1. Combs, Model 1 :19.6 

2. Reed, Highlands 1:21.0 

3. Guest. Highlands 2:21.5 

4. Scheper. Villa Madonna 1:25.6 

5. Powell, Model 1:26.0 

6. Osterman, Villa Madonna 1:28.5 

11. 400 Yard Freestyle Relay— 

1. Highlands (Cecil. Bathiany, 

Jones. Klausing) 4:29-5 

2. Hopkinsville (Wiggins. Drury, A. 

Munday, L. Mundayl 4:42.0 

!. Model (A. Smith, M. Smith, 

Hume. Bock) 4:46.9 

4. Dixie Heights (Voorhie.^, Cooper, 
Taglauer, F. Vorhii-sl 4:47.4 

5. Villa Madonna (Schroeder, Goff. 
Osterman. DesmontU 5:07.5 

6. Shelbyville (Buckner. Shannon. 
Finney. McCarthyi 5:07..'= 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1969 



The Flying Dutchman 

Memories! Memories! Dreams of long ago — . 

Memories, lots of them, come back to the Flying 
Dutchman as he pens his last colunm for the Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association and for his friends all 
over the Commonwealth of Kentucky. 

What are the things that stand out most as memories 
come flooding back? There was 1942 when the first 
clinic trip was made over Kentucky, when gasohne 
rationing was in effect and the Dutchman had to drive 
1,900 miles with coupons good for only enough mileage 
from Louisville to Cincinnati. That was the year that 
was and the year that Commissioner Ted Sanford 
dubbed the IXitohman "Dean of Basketball Officials." 
1969 is the year that saw 3,300 in attendance at the clin- 
ics as compared to 96 in 1942. 

1942 was the year that Ernie Chattin of Ashland 
showed Kentucky how a clinic could be made colorful 
when he packed officials from Ohio, West Virginia and 
Kentucky into Ashland's Y.M.C.A., and where he rolled 
the red carpet out for a frightened freshman clinic 
director. Ernie is one of Kentucky's noblemen. 

1942 was the Dutchman's first year to officiate a 
state high school basketball tournament, which was won 
by Lafayette High School. Three more state tourna- 
ments later in 1946 the door clo.sed on the officaiting 
career to permit the writer to devote fuU time to a 
county recreation and park program, which was in its 
infancy in Jefferson County, Kentucky. From 1929 
through 1946 the records show that the Flying IXitchman 
tooted a whistle in 5,001 basektbail games both in and 
out of Kentucky. Every toot was a pleasure, even those 
which were errors. You've gotta be wrong once in a 
while. 

Men, who form a long cavalcade of friends from 
1942 through 1969. include the immortal Doug Smith of 
Bowling Green, Oakley Brown of Hopkinsville, the great 
Russ Williamson of Inez, and the public-spirited Ty 
Holland of Murray. In the parade are the familiar faces 
of Edgar McNabb, Delmas Gish, George Taylor. W. B. 
Owen, Raymond Ridley, Herb Ward, Bill Shattles, 
Letcher Norton, Adolph Rupp, Harry Lancaster, Frank 
Camp, John Dromo and Peck Hickrnan. 

As the memories flood back, washed in with them 
are the games officiated by the EKitchman in which such 
outstanding successful men like Ralph Dorsey, Joe Billy 
Mansfield, Ed Mudd, Ralph Beard ;jid Gene Rhodes 
played. These men were great kids who became fine 
men because of some help from high school sports. 

The memory of the first game which Coach Ed 
Diddle gave me to officiate in Brownsville and the 
memory of that hectic first nighter must remain a 
treasured memory. Undoubtedly, the most poorly offi- 
ciated basketball game of aU time must have been 
recorded that night. Turner EIrod game me a whistle, 
"Brother Boy" Haynes lent me some white duck trou- 
sers, and Tom Ellis lent me encouragement, and off the 
Dutchman went to officiate the toughest game of that 
area on his \'irgin officiating assignment. The Dutchman 
made a mistake that night when he rode to Brownsville 
with the Woodbum team, tlie Brownies' opponents of 
the evening. 

Memories of the dearly loved Ray Baer and the 
kindly, gentlemanly Nick Denes come back. The great- 
est tribute to the memory of Ray Baer is that he left 
his footprints in the sands of time, which have caused 
many boys to become good men. Nick Denes will always 
be remembered for his love of people, his willingness to 
serve and his ability to create champions both on the 
hardwood and the gridiron. 

Whenever the Dutchman heads down into western 




The Dutchman 

Kentucky, he will always look around Madisonville to 
sec if the ageless BiU Utley or the greatly revered Sam 
Pollock are not waitirg to extend friendly helping hands. 
Whatever became of the Cox twins of Hopkins County, 
two fine athletes? 

As the sands of the hourglass run out memories of 
the schools for basketball officials, the Com Cob Pipe 
Awards, the Lion Heart and Game Guy program, and 
the memories of all of the Kentuckians who made these 
programs successful come back. Standing like two 
giant oaks in the high school forest of athletics and in 
the college woodland of sports are Ted Sanford and Ed 
Diddle. When all is said and done, it is the Dutchman's 
opinion that these two are among the greatest contribu- 
tors to wholesome sports and the development of clean, 
hard fights. From "Ted Sanford the Dutchman learned 
the lesson of frugality and the way to make a dollar go 
a long way. while from Ed Diddle he learned how to 
fight. The famous words of Diddle have served this 
writer in good stead over many years of public service, 
"Charlie, you are a little guy and you're gonna get 
knocked down many times. Just keep getting back up 
and you can never lose the fight." In our age of compe- 
tition the fellow who stays down the first time he takes 
a hard punch is a loser. Coach Diddle taught that lesson 
well. 

With the lesson this Dutchman learned from the 
grand old man of Bowling Green he passes along to 
young men w'ho will follow, this test: "The test of a man 
is the fight he makes; the grit that he daily shows; the 
way he stands on his feet and takes Fate's numerous 
bumps and blows. A coward can smile when there is 
naught to fear, when no'-hing his progress bars; but it 
takes a man to stand up and cheer when some other 
fellow stars. It's the knocks that you take and the jolts 
you get, the shock that your courage stands; the hour 
of sorrow and vain regret, the prize that escaped your 
hands — these test your mettle and prove your worth. It 
isn't the blows that you deal, but the blows you take 
on this good old earth, t.hat show if your stuff is real." 

When little Joey Carey of Lexington, the Game Guy 
winner of 1969, was honored at the annual K.H.S.A.A. 
Sports Dinner in Louisville in April for overcoming a 
physical handicap to engage in sports, and when Bobby 
Kirchdorfer, the first Game Guy winner in 1949 attended 
the same dinner, it iwas like the alpha and the omega, 
although the Game Guy Program must go on and on. 
At Carter Caves John GetUer, Julian Walker and Shir- 
ley Watts discussed the value of the Game Guy Program 
this week and commented that all of the Flying Dutch- 



i 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1969 



Page Eleven 



HOPKINSVILLE HIGH SCHOOL BOYS' SWIMMING TEAM 
KENTUCKY CLASS AA CHAMPION— 1969 




(Left to Risht) Front Row: Coach Jerry Alleyne, Bob Davis, Rodney Woodard. John Cottoff, Jim McCoIlum, Baddy 
RuBsell. Second Row : Steve Dalton, Mike Cayce, Bobby Sh inklin, Wynn Radford. Scott Woodard, Tommy Scott. Third 
Row; Paul Donoh. Don Mahoney, Jeff Toll, Breck Cayce, Peter Martascelli, John Hardin. 



man projects shoulfl be like the poet's stream, "Men 
may come and men may go but the brook goes on for- 
ever." These gentlemen were right — the race goes on; 
only the people chanj^e. 

Nobody will eve^ top Somerset's athletic director, 
Bill Clark, or Elizabothtown's Howard Gardner as the 
host With the most. Country ham dinners were Bill 
Clark's specialty while Howard was a whiz with a 
T-bone, but the real T-bone charcoaler par excellence 
has to be the "Sage of Eastern Kentucky" — Ernie 
Chattin. 

Those trips to Indianapolis and Columbus for L. V. 
Phillips, Bob Hinshaw, Heiman Keller, Phil Eskew, 
Paul Landis and Harold Meyer are fond memories of 
fine people. The associations with Oswald Tower, H. V. 
Porter and the giant of them all, "the human dynamo," 
Clilf Fagan, were rare privileges. Notre Dame had its 
"Four Horsemen" and the Dutchman names his fabu- 
lous four: (1) Cliff Fagan (2) John Bunn (3) Earl Ruby 
and (4) Kelly Thompson. 

From 1942-1969 the Dutchman learned many lessons 
fiom many people and these are passed on to yotmg 
men who will follow in this poem: 

THE MAN IN THE GLASS 
When you get wliat you want in your struggle for self 

And the world makes you king for a day, 
Ju.^t go to a mirror and look at yourself. 
And see what that man has to say. 

For it isn't your father or mother or wife 

Whose judgment upon you must pass. 
The fellow whose verdict counts most in your life 

Is the one staring back from the glass. 



You may be like Jack Homer and chisel a plum 

And think you're a wonderful guy. 
But the man in ithe glass says you're only a bum 

If you can't look him straight in the eye. 

He's the fellow to please — never mind all the rest. 

For he's with you clear to the end. 
And you've passed your most dangerous, difficult test 

If the man in the glass is your friend. 

You may fool the whole world down the pathway ol 
years 
And get pats on the back as you pass. 
But your final reward will be heartache and tears 
If you've cheated the man in the glass. 

— Author Unknown 



Minutes of Meeting 
K.H.S.A.A. Swimming Committee 

The Swimming Committee of K.H.S.A.A. held a m.eet- 
ing in Room 201, KentucTty Hotel, Louisville, 7:30 p.m., 
April 9, 1969. The following menrtbers were present: 
Miss Dorothy Kirkpatrick, Mr. Edgar McNabb, Mr. 
Jack Thompson, Mr, Don Davis, and Mr. Alfred Reece. 
Commissioner Theodore A. Sanford and Assistant Com- 
missioner J. B. Mansfield were also present. (Five 
other members of the committee were not present.) 

The meeting was conducted informally as has been 
customary. There was open discussion. However, most 
Ol the topics discussed were confined to tlie following: 

1. The classification system for K.H.S.A.A. swim- 
ming. 



fl 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 19^ 



After considerable amount of dialogue which included 
a comprehensive rt'view of the development of the pres- 
ent system by Commissioner Sanford, it was the consen- 
sus that the present system remain in force. 

2. Officiating at meets. 

There was much discussion about the problem of 
securing adeqi;ale, qualified, and responsible officials, 
especially at the levels involving lane timers, take-off 
judges, and inspectors. The committee agreed that more 
attention .should be given this concern even if sudh action 
increa.sed the cost of operation of conducting the meets. 

3. The date. 

The date tor the Class AAA meets were agreed gen- 
erally to fall in 1970 on February 20 and 21 at Plantation 
Swim Club, Louisville. The Class AA meet was tenta- 
tively set for either February 27 and 28. or March 20 and 
21, or April 3 and 4, at the UK Coliseum Pool in Lexing- 
ton. (March 2S, "Easter Saturday," was reserved for 
the annual K.H.S.A.A. Gymnastics meet.) The reason 
for not maldng a final decision was apparent because 
the Board oi Control had not convened to decide on the 
[Jaskclball Tourney dates. 

4. Meeting adjourned at 9:26 p.m. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Alfred M. Reece, Jr. 
Committee Chairman 



(6) Atherton, 



The State Gymnastics Meet 

Two Fayette County Schools, the Bryan Station Hi^ 
School and the Tates Creek High School, won respec- 
ti\'cly boys' and girls' state championships in gymnas- 
tics during the 1969 K.H.S.A.A. State Gymnastics Cham- 
pionsihip Meet, held in Louisville on April 5, 1969. 

Total points scored by the Bryan Station team were 
95. The Iroquois High School was second with 81. Scores 
in the girls' meet were more one-sided, the points of the 
Tales Creek team being 66 to Ashland's second-place 30. 
Coach George Jefferson of Iroquois was general man- 
ager of the t;vo divisions of the meet, being assisted by 
Coach Sheila Kuhlman of the Etoss High School who was 
in charge of the girls' events. 

Seven sciiools entered teams in the boys' division. 
They were: Bryan Station, Iroquois, Pleasure Ridge 
Park, Lafayette. Thomas Jefferson, Tates Creek, and 
Lincoln School. Tnere were eleven schools represented 
in the girls' divisions. They were: Tates Creek, Ashland, 
Iroquois, Doss. Pleasure Ridge Park, Atherton, Butler, 
Bry.an S'a'.ion, Lafayette, Lincoln School, and Thomas 
Jefferson. 

Results of the Meet 
BOYS 

Final Team Totals 

(1) Bryan Station. 95 points: 12) Iroquois. 81: (3) Pleasure 
Ridge Park. 18, (41 Lafayette. 5 (5) Thomas Jefferson, 1. 
Key 

BS-Bry;in St.ation : l-lroquois : PRP-Pleasure Ridge Park; 
L-Lafayette ; TJ-Thomas Jefferson. 

Individual Events 

All-Aro\in<l— 1. (tie! Chris Miller (ll, Danny Blevins (BS) ; 
3. Jeff Fuller (BS). 

Still Rings— 1. Danny Blevins (BS) : 2. Chris Miller (I) ; 
3. Mike GregoiT (1). 

Floor E.xercise^l. Mike Nicklen (PRP) : 2. Jeff Fuller (BS) ; 
3. Gary Boston (BS). 

Tumbling— 1. Derrick Johnson (BS) : 2. Gary Boston (BS) ; 
3. Jeff Fuller (BS). 

Trampoline — 1. Derrick Johnson (BS) : 2. Roger Fentress 
(I) : 3. Kenny Shuck (I). 

Side Horse — 1. Phil Brown (I) ; 2. Clinton Edwards (BS) : 
3. Mike Gregory (1). 

Long Horse Vaulting — 1. Joe Linfoot (I) ; 2. Mike Nicklen 
(PRP) : 3. Don Soper (BS). 

Parallel Bars— 1. Danny Blevins (BS) : 2. Donald Soper (I) : 
3. Mike Gregory (I). 

Horizontal Bar — 1. Danny Blevins (BS) : 2. Donald Soper 
(BS) : 3. Mike Gregory (I). 

GIRLS 

Final Team Totals 

(1) Tates Creek, 66 points: (2) Ashland, 30; (3) Iroquois. 



2. 



26: (4) Doss, 10: (5) Pleasure Ridge Park, 6 
6: (7) Butler. 6. 

Key 

TC-Tatcs Creek : Ash-Ashland : I-Iroquois : 
Pleasure Ridge Park : Ath-Atherton ; B-Butler. 
Individual Events 

AIl-Around — 1. Becky Johnson (Ashl: 
(TO: 3. Barbara Bransom (TC). 

Floor Exercise — 1. Kathy Kincer (TC) : 
(Ash) : 3. Barbara Rosenthal (TC). 

Balance Beam — 1. Barbara Bransom (TC 
iTCl: 3. Robbie Wallace (1). 

Trampoline — 1. Kim Roller (TC) : 2. Jenne Shipp (D| : 3 
Dorothy Frith (TC). 

Uneven Parallel Bars — 1. Cathy Nadorff (I) : 2. Cheryle Cas 
ter (Athi: 3. Cathy Chandoin (I). 

Vauling — 1. Leah Jones (TO) : 2. Becky Johnson (Ash) 
S. Barbara Decker (PRP). 

Tumbling— 1. Kathy Kincer (TC) : 2. Becky Johnson (Ash) 
3. Barbara Bransom (TC). 



D-Doss : PKP- 

Kathy Kincer 

Becky Johnson 

2. Kathy Kincer 



"An Athlete's Prayer" 

"Help me to play the game, dear Lord, 

With all my might and main; 
Grant me the courage bom of right, 

A heart to stand the strain . . . 
Send me a sense of humor. Lord, 

To laugh when victory's mine — 
To laugh if I should meet defeat. 

Without a fret or whine . . . 
Give me the grace to follow rules. 

To fess up when I'm wrong. 
When silence or the other thing 

Wins plaudits from the throng . . . 
When foes are tough and fighting fierce, 

And I am getting weak. 
Dear God, don't ever let me show 

A broad, bright yellow streak. 
And teach me. Lord, Ufe's game to play, 

Just one day at a time — 
With Thee as coach and trainer. Lord, 

Real victory must be mine." 

— Frederick Tyner 



I 



THE SPORT SHOP 

Phone 502 651-5143 

'10()-110 North Race Street 
Glasgow. Kentuck> 12141 

In St(jck For Immediate Deliver\ 

Baseball Equipment. Balls. Bats, 
Bases. Caps. Gloves, Homo Plate. 
Hose. Mask. Mitts. Uniforms 

Also Equipment of all types in Golf, 
Tennis, and Track. 

WRITE FOR CATALOGUE 



II 



TO: PRINCIPALS OF MEMBER SCHOOLS OF K.H.S.A.A. 



SUBJECT: CATASTROPHE INSURANCE POLICY 



The followincr information about the catastrophe insurance co\era're pur- 
chased by K.H.S.A.A. to cover athletes of memlicr schools is piil lished for 

your consideration. The coverage will commence July 1, 1969, for the 
school year 1969-70, and will be identical with the coverage for the current 
year. 

PERSONS COVERED: Student athletes on teams of member schools of 
K.H.S.A.A. will be covered while practicing: for or comoeting in K.H.S.A.A. 
approved inter-school athletic events or while travelinjr in a jjroup directly 
to or from practice session or scheduled athletic event for the purpose of 
participating in such session or event. 

ACCIDENT MEDICAL EXPENSE BENEFIT: Expenses incurred for 
treatment of a covered injury including necessary services of a licensed 
physician, hospital expenses subject to limit for dail> room and board and 
general nursing care of normal charge for semi-private room, private duty 
nursing care by R.N. on order of physician and physio-therapy performed 
while hospital confined shall l;e covered within fifty-two (52) weeks follow- 
ing the accident causing injury provided treatment for such injury com- 
mences within thirty (30) days of the date of covered accident. 

The first $1000.00 of covered expenses, or the amount of such expenses as 
are covered under all other collectible insurance of the pc^licyholder and 
insured, whichever figure is greatest, will be deducted from any claim paid 
hereunder. Subject to this provision, the Company will pay up to a maxi- 
mum of SIO.000.00 except that when payment under the plan exceeds 
$5000.00. further payment shall be 75'; of the eligible charges. 

EXCLUSIONS: No payment shall be made for hernia, appendicitis, cardiac 
disease, diabetes, detached retina, osteomyelitis, malignancy or Osgood- 
Schlatters disease, or aggravation of a pre-existing condition, or for inju- 
ries connected with fighting or brawling. 

ADMINISTRATION: This coverage is underwritten by Wabash Life Insur- 
ance Company and will be administered by The Kingden Company. At a 
later date you will be provided with information as to coverage and proce- 
dure to be followed in the event of a claim. 



W. E KINGSLEY 



V<4e K.i4>u^eH Go4Pip^afUf, 



121-123 LAFAYEHE AVENUE 
P. O. BOX 7100 



J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. 

Lite Uepartment 

LEXINGTON. KY. 40502 



GENERAL AGENT 
CHARLES C. PRICE 

PHONE 254-4095 



I 



Order Your Football Equipment Now 
For Early August Delivery 



PLACE YOUR ORDERS AT ONCE 

We will be very happy to accept your order now for any football 
equipment, as well as basketball equipment. Shipment will be made at the 
earliest possible moment and October 1, 1969, dating will be extended. We 
have nationally advertised brands — complete team equipment, so let us 
take care of your needs. We'll be glad to be of service, whether you need 
complete team equipment or just a few special items. 

We can also make immediate shipment on any Spring merchandise 
you might need. 

ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT FOR YOUR SUMMER 
PLAYGROUND PROGRAMS 

If you plan to have baseball in connection with your recreation pro- 
gram, we have a complete stock of uniforms, shoee, bats, balls and gloves 
in Little League, Babe Ruth League and regulation sizea. 

Please writ© or call for complete information and prices, and our 
salesmen will be glad to call or give you any information and asrsislaoce 
you may need. 

If you need personal vacation equipment, remember that we have a 
complete stock of golf and fishing supplies, so let us hear from you. 

HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO., Inc. 

CH 7-1941 — PHONES — CH 7-1942 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 

Ave ShipThp Day^Vou BuV^ 



r:'-::>M 



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I 1.